real time and space

Ok, real talk time.

Tekeny’s death is an important character beat for Nerys and important in the grand scheme of the war. On the other hand, it is much less important for Julian, as he has no such issues to get past, and at this point it would just be adding one more bit of hell for mid-S5 to put him through without providing any character development for Julian. Added to which, a) Julian is a proven medical genius and b) Tekeny comes to the station a full month earlier here, before he’s even had his Yarim Fel diagnosis. I tend to imagine that Ties of Blood and Water takes place over the course of at least two weeks, and that the disease tends to move fairly rapidly after a certain point, so actually, if Julian can get him in for a medical check-up, I have got enough wiggle room for Tekeny to receive effective treatment before his condition becomes serious enough that it cannot be cured.

That said, my undying love for the Cardassian dissident movement, and especially Tekeny Ghemor, is a bias of mine, so, I have come here to put it to a vote: do I kill him off or let him live?

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3

JUICE: cmon cmon cmon

TEN: This is first contact with humanity we are talking about. Far too much responsibility to just throw away on a dumb joke. No. Absolutely not.

JUICE: itll be funny

13 Reasons to Have an Out-of-This-World Friday (the 13th)

1. Not all of humanity is bound to the ground

Since 2000, the International Space Station has been continuously occupied by humans. There, crew members live and work while conducting important research that benefits life on Earth and will even help us eventually travel to deep space destinations, like Mars.

2. We’re working to develop quieter supersonic aircraft that would allow you to travel from New York to Los Angeles in 2 hours

We are working hard to make flight greener, safer and quieter – all while developing aircraft that travel faster, and building an aviation system that operates more efficiently. Seventy years after Chuck Yeager broke the sound barrier in the Bell X-1 aircraft, we’re continuing that supersonic X-plane legacy by working to create a quieter supersonic jet with an aim toward passenger flight.

3. The spacecraft, rockets and systems developed to send astronauts to low-Earth orbit as part of our Commercial Crew Program is also helping us get to Mars

Changes to the human body during long-duration spaceflight are significant challenges to solve ahead of a mission to Mars and back. The space station allows us to perform long duration missions without leaving Earth’s orbit.

Although they are orbiting Earth, space station astronauts spend months at a time in near-zero gravity, which allows scientists to study several physiological changes and test potential solutions. The more time they spend in space, the more helpful the station crew members can be to those on Earth assembling the plans to go to Mars.

4. We’re launching a spacecraft in 2018 that will go “touch the Sun”

In the summer of 2018, we’re launching Parker Solar Probe, a spacecraft that will get closer to the Sun than any other in human history. Parker Solar Probe will fly directly through the Sun’s atmosphere, called the corona. Getting better measurements of this region is key to understanding our Sun. 

For instance, the Sun releases a constant outflow of solar material, called the solar wind. We think the corona is where this solar wind is accelerated out into the solar system, and Parker Solar Probe’s measurements should help us pinpoint how that happens.  

5. You can digitally fly along with spacecraft…that are actually in space…in real-time!

NASA’s Eyes are immersive, 3D simulations of real events, spacecraft locations and trajectories. Through this interactive app, you can experience Earth and our solar system, the universe and the spacecraft exploring them. Want to watch as our Juno spacecraft makes its next orbit around Juno? You can! Or relive all of the Voyager mission highlights in real-time? You can do that too! Download the free app HERE to start exploring.

6. When you feel far away from home, you can think of the New Horizons spacecraft as it heads toward the Kuiper Belt, and the Voyager spacecraft are beyond the influence of our sun…billions of miles away

Our New Horizons spacecraft completed its Pluto flyby in July 2015 and has continued on its way toward the Kuiper Belt. The spacecraft continues to send back important data as it travels toward deeper space at more than 32,000 miles per hour, and is ~3.2 billion miles from Earth.

In addition to New Horizons, our twin Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are exploring where nothing from Earth has flown before. Continuing on their more-than-37-year journey since their 1977 launches, they are each much farther away from Earth and the sun than Pluto. In August 2012, Voyager 1 made the historic entry into interstellar space, the region between the stars, filled with material ejected by the death of nearby stars millions of years ago.

7. There are humans brave enough to not only travel in space, but venture outside space station to perform important repairs and updates during spacewalks

Just this month (October 2017) we’ve already had two spacewalks on the International Space Station…with another scheduled on Oct. 20. 

Spacewalks are important events where crew members repair, maintain and upgrade parts of the International Space Station. These activities can also be referred to as EVAs – Extravehicular Activities. Not only do spacewalks require an enormous amount of work to prepare for, but they are physically demanding on the astronauts. They are working in the vacuum of space in only their spacewalking suit. 

8. Smart people are up all night working in control rooms all over NASA to ensure that data keeps flowing from our satellites and spacecraft

Our satellites and spacecraft help scientists study Earth and space. Missions looking toward Earth provide information about clouds, oceans, land and ice. They also measure gases in the atmosphere, such as ozone and carbon dioxide and the amount of energy that Earth absorbs and emits. And satellites monitor wildfires, volcanoes and their smoke.

9. A lot of NASA-developed tech has been transferred for use to the public

Our Technology Transfer Program highlights technologies that were originally designed for our mission needs, but have since been introduced to the public market. HERE are a few spinoff technologies that you might not know about.

10. We have a spacecraft currently traveling  to an asteroid to collect a sample and bring it back to Earth

OSIRIS-REx is our first-ever mission that will travel to an asteroid and bring a sample of it back to Earth. Currently, the spacecraft is on its way to asteroid Bennu where it will survey and map the object before it “high-fives” the asteroid with its robotic arm to collect a sample, which it will send to Earth.

If everything goes according to plan, on Sept. 24, 2023, the capsule containing the asteroid sample will make a soft landing in the Utah desert.

11. There are Earth-sized planets outside our solar system that may be habitable

To date, we have confirmed 3,000+ exoplanets, which are planets outside our solar system that orbit a Sun-like star. Of these 3,000, some are in the habitable zone – where the temperature is just right for liquid water to exist on the surface.  

Recently, our Spitzer Space Telescope revealed the first known system of SEVEN Earth-size planets around a single star. Three of these plants are firmly in the habitable zone, and could have liquid water on the surface, which is key to life as we know it.

12. Earth looks like art from space

In 1960, the United States put its first Earth-observing environmental satellite into orbit around the planet. Over the decades, these satellites have provided invaluable information, and the vantage point of space has provided new perspectives on Earth.

The beauty of Earth is clear, and the artistry ranges from the surreal to the sublime.

13. We’re building a telescope that will be able to see the first stars ever formed in the universe

Wouldn’t it be neat to see a period of the universe’s history that we’ve never seen before? That’s exactly what the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to do…plus more!

Specifically, Webb will see the first objects that formed as the universe cooled down after the Big Bang. We don’t know exactly when the universe made the first stars and galaxies – or how for that matter. That is what we are building Webb to help answer.

Happy Friday the 13th! We hope it’s out-of-this-world!

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com.

i feel like coffee shops are the opposite of liminal spaces

i’ve done a decent amount of traveling and yeah there’s always places that aren’t quite real, that seem a bit out of time and out of real-space - threshold places. and those are great, i love them, the rest stations and 3am train stations and the ambiguity of reality there

but coffee shops are exactly the opposite of that, at least for me - anywhere in the world i can find somewhere to sit with my hands around a warm cup in a place that smells good and sounds like people, and it’s grounding, it’s a sense of place stemming from sensation rather than location. everything about them is very very real - the warmth and people and noise and familiarity even if you can’t read the characters of the menu.

i don’t know if this rings true for everyone, and i don’t know if there’s a better phrase for something that’sso emphatically not a liminal space, that’s a piece of reality wherever you are, even when the rest of the world is strange. but there will always be liminal spaces to pass through and it’s comforting to know that there will always be something like a coffee shop on the other side.

vimeo

Extreme close up, real time view of the Eclipse, with great shots of solar prominences and Bailey’s Beads

Not to add to the discourse but if you hate children and don’t want to have any just don’t!

Don’t interact with children! Don’t visit the homes of your friends with children! Tell your family you’re not good with kids so they won’t put you with them at family events! Use contraception! Plan B! Abortion (when available)! Put them up for adoption!

Just don’t have kids, keep them, and then constantly talk about how expensive they are and how much trouble they are and how much you resent their existence! It’s just that easy! It’s not a child’s fault that you’re a shitty person who can’t keep your disdain for their existence on lock for 2 minutes.

anonymous asked:

I often have ideas for a scene or a character but there is no plot. How can I expand these ideas into stories? I just don't know what to do with my ideas to get a story out of them. Most plotting tips require that I know at least the beginning and the end of my story. But I don't even have that.

Hi Anonymous,

I’ve heard of other writers having this same problem, so you are not alone! Here are some ideas that come to mind when I think about this.

Coming up with a Plot (from scratch)

First off, you have ideas for characters or scenes, and that’s a starting point, and you probably (I’m assuming, because it wasn’t that long ago) saw my post, What to Outline When Starting a Story, which can give some guidance on what to consider. However, if you have no idea where to even come up with a concept for your plot that post can only be so much help.

Conflict out of Story Elements

Since you have some ideas about character and scene, I’d try building off that. In some cases, you might need to flesh those out a bit more to continue (I don’t know, since I don’t know how much you have those figured out).New York Times best-selling author David Farland points out in his book Million Dollar Outlines that characters grow out of their setting. We are all influenced by our setting–where we live, where we spend our time, what century we’re part of, etc.

Setting –> Character

Farland goes on to say that out of character (and setting) comes conflict:

Setting + Character –> Conflict

Plot obviously comes from some sort of conflict, the character reacting to and trying to solve that conflict or conflicts. But let’s finish out the diagram/equation.

Setting –> Character –> Conflict –> Theme

How conflicts are dealt with in the story create the theme.

It should be noted though that this diagram may not be helpful to everyone, and it’s also possible to work backwards from it. For example, I personally don’t like the idea of starting with the setting–although, realistically, pretty much all stories start there, if only to the most basic degrees (time period, real world vs. fantasy world, Earth vs. space, etc.). I often like to start with character. But as you work on your character, at some point, you are going to be looking back at what kind of life he grew out of and where he came from, and where he is now. Other people may like to start with conflict, and work back into character and setting. So, it doesn’t have to be linear.

But let’s look at the conflict part. You need some form of conflict to have plot. As I mentioned a few weeks ago in my post Are Your Conflicts Significant? the conflict should either be broad (far-reaching) or personal to the character. If it’s not either, it’s probably not that significant. However, it should be noted that you can make almost any conflict broad, or personal.

But how do you even get to that point? If you like Farland’s diagram, what I would suggest would be looking at those characters and setting. Brainstorm conflicts by asking yourself questions.

  • What conflict can come out of this setting?

For example, in some stories, major conflicts come straight out of the setting. Most if not all dystopians, like The Hunger Games fall into this category. You can even look at movies like Interstellar, which deals largely with space travel. The major conflict came out of a setting (Earth will soon be inhabitable). In a fantasy story, conflicts can come out of the world and worldbuilding (setting), whether it’s the magic system or the world itself. In Lord of the Rings, the major conflicts often come from the setting (Frodo has to make it to Mount Doom) and magic (the One Ring is a magical object that must be destroyed). In historical fiction, it can come out of setting–what are some of the conflicts the world was dealing with during WWII?

But what about something more small-scale than Panem, outer space, and Middle-earth? Setting can play a role there too. What kind of conflicts can come out of attending high school in 2017? What conflicts might be present there? What conflicts might come out of trying to start a career as a woman centuries ago? The story doesn’t have to be epic for this sort of brainstorming to work.

Les Miserableis a good example of how setting can play into conflicts, whether it’s being a struggling young mother, a convict, or participating in politics.

  • What conflict can come out of this character?

Once you have your character, you can try brainstorming conflicts for her. Now, there are sort of two ways to approach this.

One, you look at your character–her personality, strengths, weaknesses–and ask yourself, what would this character want? Figuring out what your character wants is often vital to a good story. In some stories, it can be more simple, basic, or straightforward. Maybe your character just wants money. In other cases, it might be bigger. Maybe your character wants to defeat an evil ruler. It can be somewhat philosophical. Maybe your character dreams of ridding the universe of a false god, like in His Dark Materials.

When you know what your character wants, you can start brainstorming conflicts by considering what could stop her from getting what she wants. In Lord of the Rings, Frodo volunteers to destroy the Ring, but there are literal obstacles in his way. Space, for one thing. He has to travel for miles and miles and miles. Then there are other people and creatures: orcs, Shelob, Sauron, even his own companions–these people are in conflict with him. He has to deal with getting hurt, wounded, and fatigued. All these things are keeping Frodo from his goal. And of course, his ultimate want is to return to the Shire, but he has to destroy the Ring first.

If your character wants to be in a relationship with someone, there are obstacles too. Maybe the love interest doesn’t know he exists. Maybe there is a family feud, like in Romeo and Juliet. Maybe there is a love triangle. Whatever your character wants, you start brainstorming what could keep him from getting it.

A second approach to brainstorming conflicts with character is to look at your character and consider what kind of situations would be difficult for them, what would make them grow. In some cases, they might be the reluctant hero. Love him or hate him, as I mentioned a few weeks ago, Edward Cullen is a good example of this sort of thing. He’s a “vegetarian” vampire living his life, and then out of nowhere, a girl shows up that is basically his personal brand of cocaine. How is he supposed to deal with this? Worse. He has feelings for her. Immediately, Edward is in conflict.

Now, you can combine both methods. And in reality, both those examples have both. Sure, Frodo volunteered to take the Ring, but he was basically the only person who could. But look at him. He’s just a humble hobbit. He doesn’t do magic, he doesn’t know warfare, and he knows very little about the world. But he’s thrown into a situation where those characteristics will be tested. Similarly, Edward is thrown into a situation, but he ends up having wants too. He wants to be in a relationship with Bella. But the fact he is a vampire and she has potent blood is a conflict that impedes that.

So you can brainstorm conflicts from setting and character.

Plot out of Conflict Types

Let’s look at this another way.

There are five types of conflict.

Keep reading

5 Times Astronaut Jack Fischer Said Something in Space Was “Awesome”

Meet astronaut Jack Fischer…

He was selected as a NASA astronaut in July 2009, and is currently living and working in space for his first time. As you can imagine, going to space for the first time is both nerve-wracking and exciting. You may or may not know just how excited he actually is to be 250 miles above the Earth…To communicate his elation, he has frequently used some version of the word “awesome”.

FYI, that’s a picture of Fischer about to eat a coffee ball on station. For more on his opinion of coffee balls, check THIS out.

Let’s take a look at a few times astronaut Jack Fischer said something in space was “awesome”…

1. Burrito Smothered in Awesomesauce 

Immediately following the hatch opening to the International Space Station and Jack Fischer arriving at his new orbital home, they had the chance to speak to their families. During this time, he explained to his wife what it was like to be in space…obviously using the word awesome in the process: “It’s a burrito of awesomeness, smothered in awesomesauce baby, it’s so beautiful!”

2. Awesome Views from Space

Astronauts commonly say that one of the best parts of being on space station is the view. Earth from 250 miles above can look stunning…or as Fischer puts it…awesome!

3. Tornado of Awesomeness 

Fischer shared this video on his Twitter account on May 6 saying, “Sometimes, on a weekend, you have to spin about wildly…we can call it a tornado of awesomeness—because weightlessness is awesome!”

4. Awesome #SpaceSelfie

This selfie, taken during Fischer’s first-ever spacewalk is AWESOME and shows his cheesing smile from behind his spacesuit helmet. Check out a recap of Fischer’s first spacewalk, conducted on May 12, HERE

5. Fondue Pot Bubbling Over with Awesome Sauce

In this video, also taken during Fischer’s first spacewalk on May 12, you can hear his real-time reaction to seeing the Earth from outside the space station. Describing it like a “Ginormous fondue pot, bubbling over with piping hot awesomesauce.”

Why the Burrito References?

You might be wondering where all this burrito talk comes from. In a pre-flight interview, Fischer explained that he doesn’t particularly like sweets…so for his birthday, his wife will commonly make him bean burritos smothered in green chili and cheese! Watch the full video for 5 facts you may not know about Fischer HERE.

Want more awesomeness from Jack Fischer? Follow him on social media for regular, awesome updates!

Twitter | Facebook | Instagram

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

the Spirk experience

watching two men interact in a 1960s science fiction TV show and feeling emotionally compromised by the urge to yell “Married!” every time something homoromantic happens. Which is often.

6 Ways NASA Space Communications Connect Astronauts to Earth

1. When Astronauts Phone Home, the Space Network Answers 

Operated by our Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, this communications system enables all types of Earth-to-astronaut communication.  The Space Network is a complex system of ground station terminals and satellites. The satellites, called ‘Tracking and Data Relay Satellites’ or TDRS, provide continuous communications for human spaceflight 24/7/365. The information this network relays includes astronaut communication with Mission Control in Houston, posting live video of spacewalks and live interviews with schools, even posting Tweets on Twitter and doing Facebook posts. The Space Network can even broadcast live 4K, ultra-HD video right from the station. You can now watch an astronaut eat a space taco in high definition. WHAT A TIME TO BE ALIVE!

2. The Space Network Also Communicates Science Data 

Astronauts on the Space Station perform experiments on the station that will enable our Journey to Mars and other future human space missions. For example, astronaut Peggy Whitson works on a bone cell study that could lead to better preventative care or therapeutic treatments for people suffering bone loss as a result of bone diseases like osteopenia and osteoporosis, or for patients on prolonged bed rest. All that fantastic data is sent back to Earth via our Space Network for scientists around the world to analyze and build on.

3. The Space Network Transmits Spacecraft Health Data

The Space Network not only lets us communicate with the astronauts, it also tracks the ‘health’ of the spacecraft, be it the International Space Station where the astronauts are living, a cargo vehicle servicing the space station, or even, in the near future, crewed vehicles to other worlds. We deliver data on a spacecraft’s state of health, from power generation levels and avionics status to carbon dioxide and oxygen levels, and more to Mission Control 24/7/365.

4. The Space Network Helps Monitor Spacecraft Location

The International Space Station Is pretty big, but space is bigger. The Space Network enables flight controllers on the ground to provide a GPS-type service for the Space Station, letting them track the exact location of the space station at all times as it orbits the Earth. It also allows us Earth-bound folk to get real-time text updates when the Space Station is flying overhead. If you want to track the station, sign up here: https://spotthestation.nasa.gov

5. The Space Network Supports Launch Vehicles

Goddard’s Space Network also controls all the communications for all the missions that go to the space station. That includes command and telemetry services during launches, free flight, berthing and un-berthing to the station, as well as re-entry and landing back to Earth. 

6. The Space Network Is Also Looking Toward the Future

It’s also helping to test vehicles that will carry astronauts to other worlds. Currently, they are working with teams for our Space Launch System and commercial crew vehicles. The first flights for these vehicles will occur in 2018 and 2019, setting us on the road to Journey to Mars! This image shows the Orion capsule that will aid in our continuous march into space. 

What’s Next for the Space Network? 

We’re continuing to grow! Watch out for the launch of a new TDRS spacecraft in August 2017! TDRS-M is coming. Check out more info here and join our countdown to TDRS launch: https://tdrs.gsfc.nasa.gov

Was looking at houses to get an idea of what’s available in the area and had to share this gem

pretty nice exterior note the double garage

woah, some interesting interior decorating but nice room, looks spacious

is the kitchen carpeted? I’ve looked at this a lot and honestly can’t tell

pretty chill as far as bedrooms go and by far the most normal room in the house

bathroom looks ok

I know this has been super normal outside the 1960s/70s interior design but stick with me

big long room with glaring pink carpet. that’s not a mirror on the “back wall” like I thought at first, this room just goes. where one the house is this, I thought to myself

my lord, that’s a garage door. they converted their garage and remodeled but KEPT THE DOOR to open to the outside from their sitting/entertainment room

wut

that’s not all, let’s check out the basement

good lord. just take a moment to take it all in. decor again not updated since 1970 (this house was originally built in 1969). the teddy bears on the couch. that weird game in the foreground which I’ve never seen before. sombreros on the walls the FULLY stocked bar. like so fully stocked…

and just to top it all off, the room that utterly horrified me,

Title: So Says The Sword
Author: komodobits
Artist: kayanem
Rating: NC-17
Length: 85,000 words
Pairings: Dean/Castiel
Warnings: canon-adjacent alongside season four and five; explicit sexual content; PTSD and depression and suicidal ideation; violence and mild body horror including effects that angel trueforms have on a human body; blasphemy and a general carelessness with Biblical canon; description of lobotomy; animal death; John Winchester’s A+ parenting; time-travel shenanigans

Summary: The briefing was simple: ‘Stand guard over the Michael Sword until the battle is ready to commence. Await further instructions.’  Castiel doesn’t mind working security duty; he was briefed shortly after the initial salvation of the Sword from the pit, and again before taking up his position. He knows what to do. However, it’s easy to forget that the green room isn’t real. Time moves differently there, the space ever-changing to make a prison of mountains, cathedrals, salt flats, orchards, and whatever Castiel was led to believe about Heaven’s greatest weapon—Dean Winchester is something entirely unexpected.

Link to fic
Link to art