reading in books

“You said, he loves you as much as you love him. Then, why the both of you are not still together?” he asked.

“We both love each other. Yes, yes. And I’m not really sure why we’re not still together.” she answered very carefully as if the words she said hurt her heart like knives cutting through her veins. “Some may say it’s because of our priorities in life. But some may say that it’s not yet the perfect time. But who the hell really knows? Is it me? Is it him? I don’t know. I don’t even understand. They say that opposites do attract each other, while same signs do otherwise. We’re like walking on parallel lines with an infinite spaces in between, that even if we run faster, we will never bump on each other at the finish line. No matter how hard we try.”

—  ma.c.a // And sometimes, the world seems to be against us

Last year, I organised a Travelling Book Project, using All the Bright Places by @jenniferniven as the travelling book and it was absolutely amazing 😄
In case you don’t know what this is - the people participating select a book, that will go from one person to the next, each reading it, making notes, writing down their thoughts, reactions, drawing in it, anything goes 😊 In the end, the book returns to the person it left from. It lasted 10 months until it found its way back to me.
But I got back a book full of other readers, full of their thoughts and feelings. It was beautiful. ❤
And All the Bright Places was the best pick possible for this project. I adore this book with all my heart ❤

Happy birthday to Vincent van Gogh!

Did you know? National Book Award Finalist Deborah Heiligman wrote a non-fiction book called Vincent and Theo about Vincent and his brother, Theo. It hits shelves on April 18th, but you can start reading the first few chapters right now!

I feel the need to critically respond to this comment, because wow.

Alright. I don’t even care if they’re trolling or not, this is important. Let’s discuss this comment, because when people say stuff like ^^THIS^^ on that post, (and not many people do, you special snowflake), they have clearly missed the entire point.

I’m not going to explain what the post is. Just click here to see it.

Okay, so, I agree, that IS my way of writing a book, not everyone else’s. The purpose of the post was to show people who write books (and make art, in general), that they are not alone. That if they think the process is tedious and feels like it’s way harder and takes way longer than it should – that it’s like that for everyone who chooses this line of work. It is NOT easy in any way, shape or form (it can be extremely fun and rewarding though, and that’s part of the purpose of creating art, in my eyes. It should fulfill the artist in some way).

Next, what you see in that post is only a couple drafts of the book. I think…three printed drafts. I wrote fourteen drafts of Embassy. 14-3=11. I did 11 drafts on the computer, several of which were completed by beta readers, who also worked strictly on the computer. But I ALWAYS do a couple drafts by hand because it let’s me slow down and truly visualize what I’m doing, and it’s always for the largest edits I’ll do for any book I write. On top of the effectiveness of hand-edits, holding that fat stack of paper and showing it off to people and letting them physically see all the edits you’ve done at a moment’s notice is rewarding in itself. I give speeches at high schools, and I do book signings at Barnes & Noble, and I always bring a paper-edited draft with me, BECAUSE PEOPLE LOVE SEEING THAT SHIT IN PERSON. It makes the process real to them. It’s easy to just do it all on the computer, but when you have that manuscript in your hands and you can SEE the work you put into it, suddenly people realize that, yes, writing a book is not easy.

I did the same thing for the sequel, and I did the same thing for the third book in the series. I’ve been writing for 13 years, and in the last four years alone, I’ve spent nearly 3,000 hours PER YEAR (more time than I sleep) writing and editing books. And guess what? I’m going to do the same thing for every single book I ever write, because, like you said, that’s how *I* write my books.

I made the “Writing a book is so easy” post because it’s relatable to the thousands of other people who have ever written a book/made art/compose music/etc etc. It’s inspiring. It’s motivating. It’s challenging. Look through the comments and tags on reblogs and you’ll see how people have said how excited they are to reach this stage of the writing process, how they can’t wait to hold their books in their hands, how they themselves have gone through this process and thought maybe they were doing it wrong. Others have said it gave them way more respect for artists. Others have straight-up said “Nope. Nope. Nope.” And then others miss the entire point and feel the need to say unnecessary shit, such as what you said, and in one fell swoop, belittle all the time and effort hundreds-of-thousands of artists around the entire planet put into their creations.

You think I don’t know other people have their own ways of writing and editing? You think I don’t edit on the computer? You think your comment matters? It doesn’t, because you made a downright stupid attack on something totally and completely obvious.

The purpose of “Writing a book is so easy” is to give artists everywhere something to relate to, and to give non-artists everywhere a behind-the-scenes look at what part of the process looks like and more appreciation for the work we do. That’s it. That’s the purpose.

To inspire, motivate, and celebrate ARTISTS.