usatoday.com
Design More

I’ve seen a few Razr phones in the wild lately and enjoy the design they embraced. It was slim, metal (not plastic), and functionally fit well in the hand.
Motorola has released an updated Razr as of late, a touchscreen no doubt. But what if phone companies innovated a little. Apple still sells an iPod classic with a non touch interface and until the most recent overhaul of the nano, it too had “conventional” controls.
It would be fantastic if companies would take the brilliant simplistic design, update the guts to current market specs (pixel dense display, better camera, usable web browser, better antenna) and actually market the single product for what it is, much the way the Razr and iPhone are and not like sch-7388 type model phones, they might pickup some new subscribers. They might be older, not tech savvy or wanting something small, but are willing to pay for a data plan to have email in their pocket.
Blackberry is the closest to this, evolving from what was an email only device to a smart phone within the same form factor ( disregarding the actual operation of the device.)

New designs are great. They push the market forward in new ways, expanding usually on technologies unknown to be gained upon or unknown to consumers, but some things can remain the same, pay homage to that brilliant industrial designer of the past, and embrace a seemingly neglected market space of the present.