raw textiles

2

Tekstiler Kvartal

Chris Dove / Thesis / Post Graduate Diploma / Mackintosh School of Architecture, Glasgow School of Art / Glasgow, UK / July 2014

The Tekstiler Kvartal of Nørrebro  is located in the centre of a large urban block in Copenhagen. The blocks of Nørrebro are of an unusually large proportion, and used to contain industrial buildings at their centres which would provide work for the district. These centres were completely lost in a series of over zealous slum clearance in the 1960s. The thesis looks to reintroduce the idea of industry in the centre of a block, to form a new urban strategy for Nørrebro.

The Tekstiler Kvartal creates a situation in the centre of a block, consisting of two large industrial components that occupy the territory in the centre. These large glass and concrete components contain the spaces for recycling and making of the textiles into raw material in which young designers can use. An archive of textiles is established. The introduction of glass and concrete, into the centre of the block, acts as a new typology of architecture in the centre of the block. These industrial spaces are contrasted by a layer of smaller scale, studio spaces, which connect the industrial centre with the retail and residential edge of the block. The studio components of the Kvartal are of a solid brick construction, reminiscent of the traditional Danish typology in which it sit. The studios look to act as an intermediate element between the centre and the perimeter through the use of scale, materiality and the introduction of outside shared spaces. These exterior spaces act as a common ground between the industry and the residential edge, encouraging the integration of the public into the industry, and with it the reinvention of Nørrebro.

3

Tekstiler Kvartal

Chris Dove / Thesis / Post Graduate Diploma / Mackintosh School of Architecture, Glasgow School of Art / Glasgow, UK / July 2014

The Tekstiler Kvartal of Nørrebro  is located in the centre of a large urban block in Copenhagen. The blocks of Nørrebro are of an unusually large proportion, and used to contain industrial buildings at their centres which would provide work for the district. These centres were completely lost in a series of over zealous slum clearance in the 1960s. The thesis looks to reintroduce the idea of industry in the centre of a block, to form a new urban strategy for Nørrebro.

The Tekstiler Kvartal creates a situation in the centre of a block, consisting of two large industrial components that occupy the territory in the centre. These large glass and concrete components contain the spaces for recycling and making of the textiles into raw material in which young designers can use. An archive of textiles is established. The introduction of glass and concrete, into the centre of the block, acts as a new typology of architecture in the centre of the block. These industrial spaces are contrasted by a layer of smaller scale, studio spaces, which connect the industrial centre with the retail and residential edge of the block. The studio components of the Kvartal are of a solid brick construction, reminiscent of the traditional Danish typology in which it sit. The studios look to act as an intermediate element between the centre and the perimeter through the use of scale, materiality and the introduction of outside shared spaces. These exterior spaces act as a common ground between the industry and the residential edge, encouraging the integration of the public into the industry, and with it the reinvention of Nørrebro.

6

Spinning silk is one of the strangest processes I’ve ever seen. It’s truly a wonder how anyone could conceive and engineer this process. Above are step-by-step photos to illustrate:

The process begins by gathering the larval cocoons of silk worms. Inside each fuzzy egg is a dead larvae; if you shake one, you can hear the dead insect rattle inside. If you tug at the cocoon fuzz with your fingers, it will delicately lift from the shell, like pulling the fuzz from a sweater. In a large vat of water floats about one hundred of these cocoons. A small broom is brushed across the top of the wet cocoons, snagging the peripheral fuzz of each egg. Several wet strands are lifted, fed through a needle, then wound around a large spool. The spool is cranked by hand to twist and spin the silk into one long continuous thread directly from the eggs in the water.