rapidograph pens

Good god, this is perfection.

I just got my new Traveler’s Company (formerly known as Midori) TN in the limited Olive edition. The leather is a deep green-brown. My custom verawood pen, made by John Albert of Romulus Pens, matches it perfectly. The Rotring also has a pleasing contrast with its burgundy color… nhnnnnggghhhh!

BERSERK

This was originally a crazy commission I did awhile back for a fellow Berserk fan. I love the intensity of the story that was carried through the beautiful line work of Kentaro Miura’s art. I also studied art by Gustave Dore for further inspiration on old school pen techniques.

The whole middle composition is done by a rapidograph pen..( aka..took forever).

I hope I did it justice. You can NOT do a Berserk tribute and go half assed.

hey everyone, i’m looking to do some pen + ink commissions! i’ve found a good workflow using rapidograph, hi-tec-c, and ink pens… and i’d love to do some drawings for you!

listed in the image above is the basic info, but as it says, i’m totally capable of talking about pricing from commission to commission. ultimately, it comes down to the level of detail & amount of characters in one image. if you are interested (or know someone that is), send me a message on here and we can talk about your ideas! 

anonymous asked:

When you worked in the architect offices at the age of 16. You've never had any experience with architect before? How was the work? Did they teach you or you taught yourself? I want to find work in architect too but I'm not sure if I have that kind of confidence you got.

For starters, the work was very different. My first day they handed me a brand new set of Rapidograph pens (above) and sat me with the electrical engineers. There I learned how to write electrical drawing notes using a Leroy Lettering set (below). I did grunt work as I slowly l gained some experience, with a lot of mentoring from the draftsmen around me, as I learned by watching others and looking at other similar end results. 

I did not have any experience before that job but I left that office with some basic knowledge of how to draw using ink on mylar. I did not have any confidence and throughout most of my life as I climbed the ladder of responsibility I have felt like an impostor. But, I am a fast learner, not easily intimidated about having to learn new things and honest enough with myself and other to allow myself to learn from others. Don’t be intimidated, life as an adult does not mean knowing everything you are up against, you will never be prepared for everything life throws at you, the only way to be successful is by continually learning and never giving up before getting started!

Originally posted by yourreactiongifs

7

Above are the work stages on the variant cover I drew for the upcoming first issue of Wayward, the cool new Image series by Jim Zubkavich and Steve Cummings, which hits the shelves in August.

More info from Zub on Wayward (including the all-important pre-ordering info) can be found here: http://jimzub.tumblr.com/post/88978616985/pre-order-time-for-wayward-1

Anyhoo, the work stages are:

1) Initial rough, with the idea of using the kanji for Tokyo subway stations as a backdrop. (As opposed to drawing the actual map, which wasn’t gonna happen.)

2) Modified rough, with a pose that brought the character closer to the camera.

3) Inks, ahoy, done with a Japanese Seburo quill and a Rapidograph tech pen.

4) Color guide.

5) Colors, by John (Invincible) Rauch. Worked out great, IMHO.

6) Guide for some minor tweaks to the facial coloring; I’m hypersensitive about nose shading patterns on the faces I draw, alas.

7) The completed cover, with the subway-station kanji added in by Steve.