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Enjoy the symphony 

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Phoenix #2772 - JetSki Race!

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Run the Jewels drop some major truth a year after Ferguson

“Riots work.” At least, that’s according to Run the Jewels. In a video exclusive to the BBC, Killer Mike discussed how the events that unfolded on the streets of Ferguson last year forever changed the city for the better. And Ferguson’s own law enforcement actually agrees.

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French Montana calls black woman a “musty crusty dusty rusty ass hoe” with “nappy hair”

  • Let’s get right to it. French Montana’s tweet calling a Twitter user a “musty crusty dusty rusty ass hoe” with “nappy ass” hair is straight up misogynoir
  • The rapper’s insensitive “joke” was a response to a Twitter user named @artdecoxxx, a black woman, who made a shady remark about French Montana’s current popularity in music. 

  • Twitter reactions to Montana’s dragging of the woman ranged from outraged call-outs of anti-blackness and sexism to full-on defenses of the rappers remarks, a disappointing example of how this language continues to be normalized. Read more. (4/6/2017 11:05 AM)
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Beyonce is no one’s mammy.

So the record-scratching comments from Adele and Faith Hill shortly after Beyonce’s Grammy performance came across as absolutely bizarre. In her earnest acceptance speech for her Album of the Year win, Adele praised her fellow artist’s vision for “Lemonade,” the album Adele’s “25” bested in the category. She also all but said Beyonce deserved the Grammy.

She then turned inward and noted how difficult it was to re-enter the music business to record the album, particularly as a young mother. As a music lover and mother, I was nodding in appreciation of her vulnerability and openness.

But then she said this: “My dream and my idol is Queen Bey, and I adore you,” she gushed to Beyonce in the front row. “You move my soul every single day. And you have done for nearly 17 years. I adore you, and I want you to be my mommy, all right.”

Shortly after, Faith Hill repeated the sentiment: “I’m older than you, but I want you to be my mommy, too.”

Both comments were made without the least bit of irony, but for this black mom, those words made me bristle — seared me down to my soul.

Beyonce Is Not The Magical Negro Mammy

Photo: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

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Morrissey is selling a t-shirt with his lyric “black is how I feel on the inside” and a photo of James Baldwin

  • British singer Morrissey is in hot water after selling merchandise at concerts featuring the face of writer James Baldwin, who is currently the subject of critically beloved documentary I Am Not Your Negro.
  • Featuring Baldwin’s face is not the problem. On the shirt, hovering around Baldwin’s face like a racist halo, are the lyrics to the Smiths’ “Unloveable”: “I wear black on the outside ‘cause black is how I feel on the inside.” Yikes.
  • People on Twitter were quick to point out the racism of using Baldwin’s image to promote a lyric that has nothing to do with blackness — and doing so to make a profit. Read more (3/17/17 11:40 AM)

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Academy head insists the Grammys don’t have a race problem like the Oscars. He’s wrong.

To the ears of so many fans, artists and writers, hearing Faith Hill call Adele back onstage to receive the Grammy for album of the year over Beyoncé’s Lemonade, was a death rattle: the sound of the Grammyscredibility choking on its last sip of split pea soup before the life support machines kicked in.

“If we have any respect for albums, Lemonade is the album of the year,” wrote Win Butler of Arcade Fire, a former album of the year winner. Even Adele found it unsettling, asking “What the fuck does [Beyoncé] have to do to win album of the year?” at her post-Grammys Q&A.

In trying to explain the decision, racism was one of the first places many artists and writers turned to. “There have only been two black winners in the last 20 years for album of the year there have been over 200 black artist who have performed,” Solange wrote, pointing out a very telling balance of power in the way the Grammys appreciate treat black artists in since-deleted tweet

However, Neil Portnow, president of the Recording Academy, sees no issue here. He rejected the notion that the Grammys have a race problem in an interview with Pitchfork, published Tuesday. “No, I don’t think there’s a race problem at all,” he said, citing Chance the Rapper’s best new artist win as evidence.

Portnow too is incorrect: The Grammys do have an issue recognizing talent of color. They have for years, and unless steps are taken, there’s no reason to believe their voting will get any more representative. Read more (Opinion)

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