race-ethnicity

Where Prey(2017) succeeds in race and gender equality

Originally posted by mys-archive

  • A protagonist who is half German and half Chinese
  • The option to make the protagonist male or female
  • The protagonist’s parents are a male Chinese scientist and a female German Entrepreneur(rare interracial coupling).
  • NPCs, both protagonists and antagonists, are from a variety of ethnic groups and sexual orientations
  • A naturally emerging lesbian couple(one of whom is oriental)
  • Voice actors who match the races(or ethnic backgrounds) of their characters.
  • Including an African character with an authentic African accent(this just personally made me happy)
  • The guys did their research to give characters names that match their ethnicity
  • The fact that not just the white characters or our protagonist are competent, capable, individuals with well thought out character traits
  • That these massively different people have grouped and work together to operate a massive space station and advance humanity(before it all went to hell)
  • At no point in the narrative are any of the above aspects pointed out or called out on, as if it’s just natural to have that level of equality in Yu’s not-so-far-in-the-future world. 

Prey might not be the best game ever, but some wonderful person in the development team did something right, and I hope other games and media can follow suit. 

Feel free to correct me, add points, or tell me of other media that have done this to such an extent in the past.

anonymous asked:

hello! i'm sorry to bother you with this, obviously you really don't have to answer if you don't want to. i'm european and here spanish people as well as portuguese ppl are definitely not considered to be white, but i think it's because it comes down to smth that's different from how race and nationality are seen compared to the us. however i could be seriously mistaken and i was wondering if maybe you could explain your reasoning behind saying these ppl are white? sorry if this is naive >>

Floriana is American, her character is American, and she’s on an American show so the European view of race and ethnicity really doesn’t apply here. If you’re North American and you have solely European heritage you’re viewed as white and you have white privilege.

Writing With Color – General Topics

A collection of WWC posts that deal with more general writing advice, character creation and diversity topics applicable to most marginalized people, particularly People of Color and some ethnic and religious groups.

Writing Characters of Color: The Generals

Useful Non-WWC Posts

Diversity/Representation Topics

Character Creation

Characters of Color & Culture

Fantasy & Coding

Writing Sensitive and Controversial Topics

Racism and Micro-Aggressions 

–WWC

Reblog If Your Blog is A Safe and Welcoming Place For People of All Races, Genders, Ethnicities, Religions, and Sexual Orientations

an incomplete list of things readers want in ya, in no particular order, according to a question posed on twitter:

  • unlikable fantasy heroines
  • dragons
  • unipolar depression
    • “high-functioning” depression 
    • girls with depression
    • nonbinary people with depression
      • both of whom save the day!
  • anxiety
    • high-functioning anxiety 
    • chosen ones with anxiety
      • because that’s a stressful job
  • bipolar disorder
  • schizophrenia
  • OCD
  • characters with chronic illness / disabilities
    • without plots to overcome / magically fix their disability
  • mental health representation generally
    • with mental illness that’s maintained / managed
  • books with an emphasis on friendship
    • with friendship that doesn’t turn into a romance!
    • especially between people of different genders? boys and girls don’t automatically fall in love mate
  • books with an emphasis on family
  • books with an emphasis on platonic relationships generally
  • aromantic characters
  • asexual characters
  • aroace characters
  • demisexual characters and relationships
  • pansexual characters
  • polyamorous relationships
  • queer characters generally
    • especially in sff
    • but also literally everything 
    • seriously people just want queer books
    • AND MAKE THEM HAPPY
    • and maybe NOT in a coming out story kthx
  • nonbinary characters
    • especially in sff
    • who aren’t androgynous!
  • butch main characters
  • butch love interests
  • black boys in space
  • black boy wizards
  • intersectional sff generally
    • fantasy worlds that reflect the actual diversity of the world, what a wild concept
  • sff by people of color
  • native american / first nations authors
    • in all genres!
  • native american / first nations characters
    • in all genres!
  • two-spirit love interests
  • Native characters living their lives without the “poor” narrative
  • main characters you legitimately believe might die and aren’t safe just because they’re the main characters
  • guys with long hair
  • girls with short / no hair
  • heroines that are strong physically, not metaphorically 
  • series with different POVs in each book
  • male characters who stink after a week on horseback rather than smelling like fresh pine
  • imperfect chosen one narratives
  • lost princess stories 
  • snarky best friend as the lead books that leave you both confused (“WTF was that!?”) and in awe (“I LOVED IT”)
  • books you can’t place easily in one genre
  • obliteration of “she’s not like other girls” comments
  • girls supporting other girls
  • asian characters!!!
  • original fairy tales / dark, atmospheric contemporary fantasy
  • nonfiction
  • lesbians
  • bi girls
  • bi boys
  • bi characters generally
  • happy f/f ships 
    • especially with trans girls!
  • books that leave you going “well, that was a delight!”
  • characters who don’t get a romance but want one
  • hijaabis
  • teens who love and use science
  • more actual physical ships
    • the ones you sail
    • not the relationship kind
    • the arrrrr, matey kind
  • intersectional characters! (ie: bisexual with anxiety)
  • more than one person with an identity in a cast
    • did you know you can have TWO ASEXUALS in one story
    • whoa
  • retellings
  • selfish heroines
  • queer friendships
  • characters of color who don’t know their race / ethnicity 
  • non-WWII historicals
  • fat characters
    • fat LADY characters
    • who are HAPPY
  • evil narrators who don’t think they’re evil
  • evil narrators who KNOW they’re evil
  • arab main characters
  • healthy parent / child relationship
  • grandparent caretakers
  • parents that aren’t mysteriously dead for Plot Reasons
  • sex positivity
  • healthy views of the first time you have sex
  • hearing-impaired / Hard of Hearing / Deaf protags
  • hearing-impaired / Hard of Hearing / Deaf side characters
  • #ownvoices learning disabilities
    • autism
    • ADHD
    • dyslexia
      • not by parents of people with disabilities
      • ‘cause that’s not ownvoices babes
  • multiracial main characters
  • filipina main characters
  • eccentric thrillers
  • characters overcoming internal struggles without matching external struggles
  • well-written eating disorders
  • quiet stories
    • especially quiet fantasy
    • not every fantasy needs to be WE’RE ALL GONNA DIE
  • abusive controlling dudes getting called out and NOT being the romantic interest
    • abuse isn’t romantic writers sorry not sorry
  • interracial relationships not between POC / white character
  • queer interracial relationships
  • stories set in South Asia
  • stories focusing on social issue
  • multiple points-of-view
  • religious protagonists
  • non-Western narrative structures
  • college stories
  • study abroad stories
  • settings as characters
  • big cities
  • girls playing sports
  • Latinx characters whose families are from more than one country
  • Latinx characters who aren’t JUST mexican
  • books without romance
    • especially fantasy
    • or books with mental illness
  • characters of color saving the world
  • queer characters of color falling in love and getting a HEA
  • queer biracial characters
  • characters of color on book covers
  • queer characters who fall in love with each other
    • because y’know queer people aren’t just side characters or plot points
  • south indian main characters
  • people of color playing sports
    • especially asians
  • dudes of color as love interests without being exotic accessories to white girls
  • soft and gender-nonconforming dudes of color
  • asians of various religious backgrounds
  • dark-skinned heroines
  • disabled heroines
  • trans heroines
  • #ownvoices Jewish stories that aren’t about WWII
  • immigrant / expat stories
  • people who have moved a lot
  • multi-ethnic people and communities
  • immigrant stories
  • nonbinary aroace main character
    • there are currently none
  • contemporary YA set in the caribbean
  • disabled people of color
  • nuanced portrayal of domestic violence  + divorce + single parents in diapora Asian families
  • queer disabled South Asian characters
  • paranormal YA based on nonwhite cultures
  • #ownvoices Asian fantasy
  • #ownvoices arabian / south asian / islam-inspired stories
  • non-European fantasy generally
  • morally grey villains AND heroes
  • kids with a mentally ill parent
  • fantasy characters with allergies or asthma
  • pirates
    • lady pirates!!!
  • dumb but sweet dudes - no secret smarts here
  • books that start with an established romantic relationship
  • silly or rom-com-like SFF
  • main characters with glasses

tl;dr: if you are writing it, somebody is interested in it.

2

Trump’s approval rating hits new low, according to a new Gallup poll

  • Just two months into his first term, only 37% of Americans approve of Trump’s job performance, according to a Gallup poll released Sunday. 
  • His disapproval rating, meanwhile, hovers around 58%.
  • The numbers are a stark contrast to the approval rating of his predecessor, Barack Obama, who at the same point in 2009 had a 61% approval rating according to the same poll. Read more (3/20/17 8 AM)

Most young people in the US think Donald Trump is an illegitimate president

  • A majority of young adults in the U.S. think that President Donald Trump is an illegitimate president, according to a new GenForward poll.
  • The poll found that 57% of Americans between ages 18 and 30 believe that Trump’s presidency is illegitimate.
  • The poll also found that young adults across all races and ethnicities disapprove of Trump’s performance as president and believe that the country is on the “wrong track.” Read more (3/20/17 9 AM)
advocacy: have some perspective, don’t throw your own people under the bus

I’ve seen a lot of discourse lately about how Blizzard is handling Emily/Tracer wrong - how there’s no sign of it in the game, etc. etc. And there isn’t, yet. There isn’t any sign Tracer is gay in the actual game, so it’s fair comment. I’ve also seem what is pretty unfair conclusions about why this is thrown around, I’ve seen really nasty snark disguised as witty criticism., and it… leaves a bad taste in my mouth, really. 

A very close friend of mine works in an AAA studio. She’s worked in gaming for 10 years. She literally works herself to the bone trying to push social justice in games - and it’s like pushing a fucking boulder uphill forever, let me tell you. I’ve watched what this tireless advocacy is doing to her. Nevertheless, she keeps going. 

It’s because of people like my friend that Overwatch exists - people who have persistently, tirelessly, at threat to their relationships, livelihoods and careers advocated for diversity and representation in games. 

I can only imagine how fucking hard it’s been to change the culture in Blizzard into a company where they publish an AAA game that is as diverse as Overwatch. It’s because of people like my friend, allies, and other supportive people that we have Overwatch at all.

Let’s review some of the great things about the game: a variety of diverse races, ethnicities and identities - consultation was pretty fucking good for most of those. And they listen to our comments about what’s missing, too. We didn’t like that Pharah’s VA wasn’t Egyptian, so what did they do? They got an Egyptian VA living in Egypt to voice Ana. We didn’t like the lack of black characters, and they’ve promised more, and the latest new character is an Omnic created by child genius Efi who is black - and they got a black woman for Orisa’s VA.

Blizzard has handled female characters very well. We complained after they’d released their initial characters that the body type of the female characters was generic and not diverse. So what did they do? They gave us Zarya and Mei. We complained that Tracer was being objectified in one of her poses. What did they do? They changed the fucking pose. They have given us a Muslim single mum who’s 60 old, still a soldier, has sexual agency and is more than just her role as ‘Mum’. The spread of female characters isn’t 16-25 as per most games that have female protagonists, but 19-60, with the majority of them being in their 30s, and that is fucking great

And all of this is aside from the fact that Tracer - the face of the fucking game - is canon, confirmed lesbian in those words by both the devs and in ¾ of a big major comic. She’s in a healthy adult relationship. Plus, there’s more to come. We know more characters are queer, too. 

There’s probably more stuff to add, but off the top of my head - how great is this fucking game?????

Now, it’s not to say that all of this has been done perfectly - there’s always room for improvement. They always could do things better. But the tone of some of the posts I’ve read is as if none of this exists. As if Blizzard has spat in our faces, somehow, by not having Tracer have mentioned Emily in the game yet. The anger, the entitlement, the mockery. 

You’re mocking probably a bunch of queer people, people of colour and women who have pushed and pushed and pushed the gaming industry for decades in order to get a game like Overwatch. You’re mocking people like my friend who has slogged her fucking guts out to get what we’ve got in the games her company produces. Can you imagine what it must be like for those people, responsible for these changes in Blizzard and in the industry, to read people bitching about the fact Tracer doesn’t say anything about Emily (yet) when they’ve pushed so fucking hard just to get what we’ve gotten? 

Do you realise how horribly ungrateful and rude that sounds? You may not be aiming your criticism at these people, but they’re among us. They read social media. They’re real people with real feelings. 

Can we please have some appreciation for just how far Overwatch has taken diversity in games? Because there’s a bunch of minority folks behind this push, mark my words. 

This post is not to discourage criticism, but please, please think of the tone of voice you give it in. Don’t be cruel or unfair. Don’t mock. Don’t be ungateful, please. 

“It’s as if Emily doesn’t even fucking exist, I wonder why that is lollllll fucking blizz” works so much better as “Hey Blizz, I love that Tracer has a girlfriend! Let’s have Tracer mention Emily in the game? :D” 

There are ways to deliver suggestions and feedback that don’t shit all over the people who’ve worked so hard to bring this game to you. Please take an extra 5 seconds to consider not sounding entitled and awful, and think about how else you could deliver this feedback so you’re not hurting the people who have worked their whole lives so you have it <3

4

Cultural Appropriation is a real, important, and harmful thing, but god damn if it’s not one of the most recklessly abused terms in the social justice lexicon.

Transcription under the cut for accessibility

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When I see white girls: 😍
When I see brown girls: 😍
When I see Native girls: 😍
When I see Asian girls: 😍
When I see black girls: 😍
When I see light girls: 😍
When I see dark girls: 😍

When I see girls who lift up other girls, regardless of their skin color, and support eachother: 😍😍😍😍😍😍

anonymous asked:

why don't you like kathleen kennedy? shes the only female and she seems nice

it’s april 2017 and there are still people who dont know kk is a white demon

  • kk is an icon of white feminism.
  • when she doesn’t get involved directly, female characters’ looks get incredibly diverse (animated series or novels etc. although, we can’t say they treat women of color well.)
  • new female actresses who play lead roles, d ridley, f jones, and e clarke are all white brunette (just like her). this is my personal opinion but for me, f jones was the weakest part in rogue one because of her emontionless and soulless performance, but kk was the one who insisted on casting her and she’s very proud of it. we haven’t seen clarke’s performance in the upcoming han solo film yet but she’s already very famous for horrible eyebrow acting (even her fans admit it). tessa thompson and zoe kravitz, who also auditioned for clarke’s role, is obviously better than her.
  • (also, i think the rogue one novel was a bit better but the movie was… it focuses on the white woman, who didn’t care about the rebellion but only herself then becomes a hero. it’s not feminism when men of color are used to spotlight a white woman, especially when one of them has sacrificed everything for the rebellion from when he was a very young kid. when i heard jyn’s character was originally more like cassian i couldn’t stop groaning because THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN SO MUCH BETTER.)
  • ‘for some reason’ she keeps thinking white brunette women are the most ideal people to get the roles. even if she’s doing it unconsciously, it doesn’t change the fact that’s racism. she’s a racist.
  • and when you are a racist you can’t be a feminist because feminism means you support all the women.
  • she seems very passionate when she talks about rey and jyn but when it’s about other actors who are men of color she suddenly becomes silent?? and she talks about this “girl power” a lot but when it’s about races, ethnicities and diversity she doesn’t say anything? it’s always the directors who sat next to her who speak about it, or actors of color themselves. her “girl power” only involves white women and yet she said star wars represented the world. 
  • she was a producer of complete disaster : avatar the last airbender movie, where almost everyone got whitewashed, which means she learned nothing from her past.
  • @kyber-sphere replied:  Actually, she isn’t even a feminist. Every time someone asks questions about “girl power” in panels she gets obviously irritated. One time, she was even dismissive towards the person who asked it too.
2

Sens. Cory Booker, Bernie Sanders introduce bill to block Trump’s potential Muslim registry

  • Democratic Sen. Cory Booker is introducing a bill that would prevent Donald Trump from creating a Muslim registry. 
  • The bill, according to the Washington Post, is sponsored by several key Democrat senators including Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Jeff Merkley, to name a few.
  • The legislation would prohibit federal government agencies from establishing any kind of “immigration-related” registry based on religion, race, age, gender, ethnicity, national origin, nationality or citizenship. 
  • The bill would block a program similar to the National Security Entry-Exit Registration System, a database built by Trump transition team member Kris Kobach in 2001 under the Bush administration. Read more
Stereotyped vs Nuanced Characters and Audience Perception

Writing with color receives many questions regarding the stereotypes Characters of Color and their story lines may possess.

There’s a difference between having a three-dimensional character with trait variance and flaws, versus one who walks the footsteps of a role people of their race/ethnicity are constantly put into. Let’s discuss this, as well as how sometimes, while there’s not much issue with the character, a biased audience will not allow the character to be dimensional.

But first: it’s crucial to consider the thinking behind your literary decisions.

Trace your Logic 

When it comes to the roles and traits you assign your characters, it’s important to ask yourself why you made them the way they are. This is especially true for your marginalized characters.

So you need an intimidating, scary character. What does intimidating look like on first brainstorm? Is it a Black man, large in size or presence? (aka a Scary Black Man) A Latino with trouble with the law? If so, why?

Really dig, even as it gets uncomfortable. You’ll likely find you’re conditioned to think of certain people in certain roles on the spot.

It’s a vicious cycle; we see a group of people represented a certain way in media, and in our own works depict them in the way we know. Whether you consciously believe it’s the truest depiction of them all or not, we’re conditioned to select them for these roles again and again. Actors of Color report on being told in auditions they’re not performing stereotypical enough and have been encouraged to act more “ethnic.” 

This ugly merry-go-round scarcely applies to (cis, straight) white people as they are allowed a multitude of roles in media. Well, then again, I do notice a funny trend of using white characters when stories need a leader, a hero, royalty, a love interest…

Today’s the day to break free from this preconditioned role-assigning.

Keep reading

Trump suggests funding historically black colleges may be unconstitutional

  • President Donald Trump signaled Friday that a 25-year-old federal program helping finance construction projects on historically black college campuses may be unconstitutional.
  • In a statement released after signing the government spending bill that deterred a government shutdown, Trump wrote that the HBCU funding program is an example of a program “that allocate benefits on the basis of race, ethnicity and gender." 
  • He said his administration would make sure the provision is consistent with the equal protection of the laws under the Fifth Amendment. Read more. (5/6/17, 10:04 AM)
Writing Strong Emotions

@chemistreat asked: “How can one control and write the pure emotion of learning you aren’t who you think you are- in ethnicity, religion, race or otherwise? Something that makes a character rethink all of their traditions?”

When it comes to writing these moments of epiphany or emotional overload, it might feel like your writing in these scenes just can’t get to that level of emotion you hope to achieve. With some of these moments, the emotion might start to feel cheesy or just not enough, or it might be such a mess of different emotions, like anger, shock, disappointment, and betrayal that you don’t really know how to show it all. 

In either case, the big emotions are not easy, however there are a few techniques you can use to become better at putting them into words. 

1. Describe the setting after… This is one exercise that helps you write with emotion in a way that goes beyond what the protagonist may be able to directly express. Examples of this might include, describe a living room after an argument. Or describe a bride’s bedroom the morning before her wedding. These exercises force you to think of how emotion can shape the world of your novel beyond just the protagonist’s experiences. 

Keep reading

Writing With Color – Featured POC Profiles

Writing With Color is grateful to receive PoC Profiles from folks all over the world, PoC Profiles being a snapchat in the life of folks of marginalized race, ethnic and religious groups who share their stories. This post features some that have gained traction from readers and resonated with many (Based on 2014-2016 results).

Top Frequented Profiles

Personal Experiences on Important Topics

We highly encourage reading all of the perspectives WWC readers have to offer. You may find them insightful, especially in regards to getting that “real” perspective as well as learning more of how people would like to be portrayed in media, as many offer thoughts on their representation.

View the rest of the collection of PP here.

If you’ve got some experiences to share as a PoC and/or ethnic or religiously marginalized person, submit them to writingwithcolor.tumblr.com/submit.

Don’t know where to start? Topic ideas provided here.

–WWC

anonymous asked:

Is latinx a race?

I’m going to quote myself to answer this Anon, but short answer is “no”. Latinx is an ethnicity not a race. The longer and more detailed answer can fully be found in my article Being Latinx in Comics: Ignorance, Erasure, Whitewashing, Oh My!. But I copied some of the more relevant bits below.

All these problems with Latinx representation in comics comes down the the ignorance surrounding the Latinx identity. Comics as a medium don’t appear to have a clue what being Latinx is or how to represent Latinx people. To understand how to depict Latinxs in comics, we have to begin understanding the difference in what Hispanic and Latinx mean — what an ethnicity is — and how being Latinx and/or Hispanic is a racialized one.

To begin, it is a common misconception that Latinx and Hispanic peoples are one and the same. People who are Hispanic are people who descend where a country’s language is primarily Spanish-speaking and have ancestry that can be traced back to the Iberian Peninsula or Hispania. This includes Spaniards, Mexicans, and Puerto Ricans, but it wouldn’t include Brazilians as the primary language spoken is Portuguese. Latinx identifies people from Latin countries, and have ancestry from Latin America (both south and central). So Puerto Ricans, Mexicans, Colombians, and Brazilians. These differences are all due to a history of colonization at the hands of European countries such as Spain and Portugal.

You can be Hispanic but not Latinx, just as you can be Latinx but not Hispanic, and you can even identify as both. But no matter which a person may identify with, it doesn’t automatically mean they’re a person of color. Latinx or Hispanic both are an ethnicity not a race. You can be Hispanic and white, or Latinx and white. You can also be Latinx and a person of color or Hispanic and a person of color.

For example, Penelope Cruz is often mistaken for being Latina, but she is a Spaniard, making her Hispanic and at least part white (she may or may not have Romani ancestry). Another example is probably one of the most well known Hispanic actors to date, Antonio Banderas. However Banderas is another European Spaniard man, which makes him white. He is a white Hispanic actor.

Unlike Latina actress Rosie Perez who is an indigenous Boricua (Puerto Rican) woman. Or Salma Hayek whose father was Lebanese, and whose mother was native Mexican and Spanish making her both Latina and Hispanic and a woman of color. This is a lot of information at once, and it can be difficult to understand if we don’t understand what an ethnicity actually is.

An ethnicity is being apart of a specific social group that shares a similar culture, ancestry, and other cultural factors. To put it simply, race is determined by biology or genetics, while ethnicity is defined by culture.Common ethnicities Americans are familiar with are Greek, French, English, Irish, and German. But it is also known that these ethnicities are primary made of white Europeans (not to say there aren’t Greek, Italian, English, etc. who are also people of color). Other common ethnicities are: Latino/Hispanic, Arab, Jewish, and Romani. The aspect these specific ethnicities have in common is that they are racialized.

Latinx people are not a race, but still face discrimination in a similar form to racism. This goes for Jewish, Romani, and Arab individuals. There are plenty of racialized (or ethnic) stereotypes in our western media that paint a negative image of these individual groups. Arab people are terrorists, Jewish people are greedy and evil, Romani people are thieves, and Latinos are exotic or lazy. Though none of these groups are a specific race, their ethnicity has been racialized through a history of negative propaganda, fear, dehumanization, and purposeful negative misinformation. They’ve also been given exaggerated ethnic features to differentiate them from white Europeans or those of white European descent.Spaniards are white. They are not Latinx. The indigenous Latinx populations in Central and South America were colonized by Spaniards, suffering similar inhuman injustices that Native Americans faced at the hands of the British when coming to North America.

Hope this helps Anon, I’d also check out @misangremellama @reclaimingthelatinatag for more in-depth information. 

Philippines

This is an example of how black/brown people in India and surrounding regions got straight hair. 

Stop calling them “a different race”. They are an ethnic group within the black family.

Our thinking is a result of conditioning and it’s time to come out of it.