race of the cure

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Masterpost: Autism and Vocabulary

As a writer, we’re sure you are aware that words are important. You can’t always substitute one for another because they all have their own depth of meaning and their own subtleties. So if you want to write an autistic character, you’ll have to refer to autism using the right words. This post will help you do just that!

Autistic person? Person who has autism? Which one should I use?

This is a highly debated question. You might have heard “You have to say “person with autism” because you’re talking about a person first; the person is not defined by their disability!”. While this is a nice thought, it is largely misguided, and this way of talking are mainly used by non-autistic persons while talking about us. The autistic community doesn’t like this “person-first” language very much for several reasons.

First of all, if you need to use specific language to remind yourself that we are people, you may have a problem that no amount of linguistic workarounds can solve. We say “a French person”, not “a person who is French” or “a person with Frenchness”, because we don’t need to remind ourselves that French people are people. Why should it be different with autistic people?

The second reason most of us don’t like saying we are “persons with autism” is that our autism is not something that we carry with us. We are not a human person + a terrible disorder. We are fundamentally different. Being autistic is an integral part of who we are as people, and touches every sphere of our lives. If someone somehow managed to take away our autism, they wouldn’t reveal the “real us” that was hidden behind it: they would create a whole different person. We can’t be separated from our autism, and this should be reflected in the language you use while talking about us.

So ideally, you’ll want to use “autistic”, as an adjective: Cat is autistic, they are an autistic person. Some of us sometimes use “autistic” as a noun as a shortcut, when we’re tired of repeating “people” all the time, but it’s best to avoid it when you can, especially if you’re allistic.

What you really need to avoid is “a person with autism”, or heaven forbid “a person who happens to have autism”, “a person who suffers from autism”, “a person who lives with autism”, or any variation thereof. I’ve also seen a few people write “an autist”, but I don’t get why they do that. Please don’t do it.

And please don’t refer to us as being “on the spectrum,” we don’t need a euphemism to soften the blow of the word “autistic.” We are autistic! Even those who don’t seem disabled. Please remember that, while it is all too often misused in an insulting or pejorative way, “autistic” is not a bad word. Don’t be afraid to use it! In fact, using it more and in a positive way is the best way to stop it from being misused as a pejorative.

You keep using these words I don’t understand…

Alright, let’s get a glossary going! We’ll update this post whenever we use a word that could be hard to understand (if we can remember to do it…). If there is any word on the blog that you can’t understand, check if we’ve explained it here. If we haven’t, shoot us an ask and we’ll do it ASAP. :)
All of the titles are clickable and will take you to the corresponding tag so you can check out everything we’ve written about a subject.

AAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Encompasses all means of communicating used by nonverbal people which are not spoken/sign language, such as using a text-to-speech device or a pictogram system to communicate.

ABA: Applied Behaviour Analysis, the most common type of “therapy” autistic children are subjected to. It can have lots of negative long-terms effects on the person’s life, such as PTSD or vulnerability to abuse.

Ableism: Treating disabled people (including autistic people) poorly because they are disabled.Treating someone differently because they behave in autistic ways, punishing autistic people for stimming, forcing nonverbal autistics to communicate verbally (and ignoring other types of communication), etc. are all examples of ableist behavior.

Alexithymia: Difficulty identifying one’s own emotions, very common in autistic people. They may not know how they feel at all, or simply unable to name their feelings. They are often unable to answer the question “How are you?” or “How are you feeling?” and may be aware only of whether they are feeling “good” or “bad” (and sometimes not even that).

Allistic: Someone who is not autistic. Used as an adjective and sometimes as a noun.

Asperger’s Syndrome: An outdated diagnostic term for an autistic person who is generally able to communicate verbally at a typical age and shows interest in social relationships. This is no longer considered to be a thing which exists. (See our masterpost on functioning labels.)

Autistic: Someone who is autistic (ie the subject of this whole blog) (I don’t know why we added that to the glossary)

Cure Culture / Curism: The attitude held by many allistic groups (most notably the hate group “Autism Speaks”) that autism is a disorder or disease which should be eliminated from the human race and place a priority on “curing” it. This is similar to the old belief that homosexuality is a disease that should be cured, and just as harmful to autistic people.

Disability: There are two main definitions to this word: 1- Not being able to do something that the majority of people are able to do. For example: hear (deaf), see (blind), smell (anosmic), walk (para/quadriplegic), etc.  2-Being impaired by a physical/mental difference in a way that restricts one’s professional, social, personal, or leisure activities. Depending on the definition and personal opinions, autistic people can be considered disabled or not disabled.

Dyspraxia: Difficulty with gross and/or fine motor skills, very common in autistic people. To a casual observer they may appear clumsy, often dropping things, walking into things, or tripping over their own feet (gross motor skills), or with poor handwriting, poor ability to hold a writing instrument, etc. (fine motor skills).

Echolalia: Use of verbal repetition to communicate, usually used by those who are not fully verbal. Words and phrases can be immediately repeated directly (“You OK?” “You OK.”), or with some changes (“Are you OK?” “I am okay.”). They can also come from memory (“Who gave you that?” [Darth Vader voice] “I am your father.” = my father).

Executive Dysfunction: Difficulty with executive functioning; skills used to make decisions and carry out tasks. Many autistic people have problems with this. They may be unable to make what appear to be simple decisions or figure out how to accomplish a simple goal. They may know exactly what they need to do but be unable to get their body to move to do it. It has been described via metaphors in a few ways: one is having all the ingredients to make a cake but no recipe, and being expected to make the cake, but having no idea how to do it. Another is that the body is like a horse and the brain is the rider, and the rider tries to get the horse to move, but it simply won’t budge.

Functioning Labels: Outdated and inaccurate (but sadly, still commonly used) labels for autistic people based on a narrow set of criteria. Those who don’t communicate verbally are normally considered “low-functioning”, for example, and those who can are “high-functioning”. See our masterpost for more information on why these labels are damaging and should not be used.

Hyperacusis: When a person is extremely sensitive to sound and the world sounds far louder to them than to others. It is often extremely painful, like having the volume on the world turned up way too high, and can be disabling. Many people with hyperacusis have or develop tinnitus (a constant sound, often ringing, usually caused by nerve damage in the ears).

Hyperempathy: Having far more affective empathy than a normal person. This can result in things like crying often, being unable to comfort upset people because their emotions are too overwhelming, etc. Some people feel hyperempathy all the time. Some have it only sometimes or for some people, or for inanimate objects.

Hypersensitivity: A blanket term which means “being more sensitive than most people to something”. When it comes to autism, it can refer to several things. Most of the time, it is used about sensory hypersensitivity, such as sensitivity to sounds or bright lights. There is also emotional hypersensitivity (easily getting hurt feelings/responding very strongly to positive feelings).

Hyposensitivity: The opposite of hypersensitivity, some autistic people feel a lack of sensory stimulation. They feel understimulated and may constantly feel the need to seek sensory stimulation. It’s important to note than an autistic person may be hypersensitive in some ways and hyposensitive in others, or at different times.

Infodumping: Sharing a large amount of information on a single topic all at once, often without pausing or allowing others to speak, due to overwhelming enthusiasm for the subject. It is usually done on subjects of special interest.

Low empathy: Some autistic people feel reduced or no affective empathy for other people (do not identify with their emotions or feel inspired to a certain emotion when they see others having that emotion). This does not necessarily mean that they do not care about the emotions of others - some may not care, some may care a great deal - only that they do not feel what others feel. Some people with low empathy for other people have hyperempathy for inanimate objects or fictional characters.

Meltdown: When the brain is too overloaded with sensory information or stress and can no longer function properly, an autistic individual may have a very violent reaction, called a meltdown. The person melting down is generally in a lot of pain. They might scream, throw things, yell curse words and insults, cry, hurt themselves or other, and try to hide themselves in absurd locations like under couch cushions or behind doors.
This neurological event cannot be controlled or stopped once it begins. It can be made worse by interfering and adding more sensory input (by touching or talking to the person) and usually will not subside until the person is left alone to calm down. 

Neurodivergent/Neuroatypical: Having a neurology which is different from the most common ones, such as being autistic or having ADHD. Some people include mental illnesses in this label, some do not.

Neurodiversity: The philosophy that in order to succeed, survive, and thrive, the human race needs many different types of neurology, and that neurodiverse people are an important and positive component of our species.

Neurotypical: A term which is defined as “having the most common type of neurology” (ie not autistic, without ADHD/dyslexia/tourette’s, etc.). Someone with a mental illness may or may not be considered neurotypical depending on people’s opinions.

Nonverbal: Someone who cannot or does not communicate verbally (using spoken language, often including sign language). Some autistic people are always nonverbal. Most are nonverbal under stress or overload. Some are always verbal.

Passing: Successfully behaving enough like an allistic person, particularly in social situations, that no one suspects you are autistic. Often important or even necessary for some people, especially when it comes to work situations.

PECS: One of the AAC methods which is most commonly used with autistic children (and sometimes adults). Stands for “Picture Exchange Communication System”. A pictogram-based system.

Proprioception: All of the sensory input which comes from inside your body. Includes your brain’s awareness of where the different parts of your body are. Autistic people often have very poor proprioception. As a result, they may have some type of dyspraxia, odd facial expressions, odd posture and walking gait, etc., all of which they may not be aware of until someone tells/shows them.

Sensory Processing Disorder: The clinical term for someone who has difficulty processing sensory information. Includes sensory hypersensitivity, hyposensitivity and differences. Too many details to process can lead to sensory overload, shutdowns, and meltdowns. Some autistic people don’t agree that it is a disorder, and prefer to talk of “sensory processing differences”.

Sensory Overload: When too much sensory information is being sent to the brain and the brain can no longer keep up. It becomes painful and the person can become incapable of accepting new sensory information until the brain has time to catch up (like a computer freezing when too many programs are open). This often leads to shutdowns and/or meltdowns.

Shutdown: A defense mechanism against sensory overload and stress. The brain attempts to shut out all sensory input by disconnecting from the environment. The person might no longer understand speech (or even fully hear it), be able to think in language (or to think in any way at all), move their body, or communicate in any way. Their eyes might unfocus and they may seem to be completely “out of it”. This state is usually a sign that the person needs to be left alone for their brain to calm down, but if pushed by those around them, they may switch to having a meltdown.

Special Interest: A subject which an autistic person is extremely interested in and will go to great lengths to learn everything possible about.

Spoons: A metaphor used to indicate the (limited) amount of energy a disabled or sick person has to devote to various tasks. There is a whole script blog devoted to this (@scriptspoonies). Many autistic people rely on this metaphor to describe their (lack of) energy.

Stimming: Repeated actions which are used to stimulate one’s own nervous system, done for various reasons including to soothe oneself/calm down, express emotions, communicate, or just because it feels nice. Common examples include rocking back and forth, flapping hands, clenching jaw, tapping a part of the body, making a repeated noise, etc.

Verbal: Able to communicate using spoken language.

REQUEST: Damon and reader. Where the reader is there for Damon throughout everything and he finally realized he’s in love with her!

Doppelgängers. The Originals. The race for the Cure. Heretics. Gemini Coven.

Damon Salvatore and his friends had seemed to have been through it all. Way more than what regular people would ever have to go through. But of course, they weren’t regular people. They were dead. Well, some of them.

Including you.

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10

Busy week! And it culminated in an extremely busy Saturday.
Work this week was super, super busy. Tons of paperwork on top of answering phones.
I went to my second appointment with my doctor on Tuesday. It went pretty well. So far. Then I had to go get some blood work during my lunch hour on Thursday. Now I just have to wait and see what could be wrong.
I’ve hit 10,000 + steps every day this week, yayyy. And today I walked in the Race for the Cure 5k.
Later on, I went to an air show. Air shows are pretty cool but they scare me to death.
I hit 20,000 steps today. That was a new record for me. My legs hurt.

  • X-Men: The government is comparing mutants to weapons, trying to get them all to register, but the real villain of the movie is MAGNETO.
  • X2: There is now a US general who used armed soldiers to seize a school building full of children and who has captured the X-Men's leader and is using his brain to wipe out the entire mutant race. The real villain is still MAGNETO.
  • X3: There's been a "cure" discovered that deprives mutants of their mutation and has been weaponized. Also, Jean Grey, one of the X-Men's own, has come back from the dead as a terrible being of unfathomable power. Somehow, the real villain of the movie manages to be MAGNETO.
  • XMFC: Sebastian Shaw has been torturing, abusing, and manipulating mutants for decades, and he and the Hellfire Club plan to start WWIII. The villain of the movie is MAGNETO.
  • DoFP: The US government is sanctioning a program that will lead to a dark timeline in which mutants are hunted by robots and rounded up in concentration camps. The villain of this movie is not Bolivar Trask, who is building the Sentinels, or Mystique, whose actions inadvertently cause the timeline to come to pass, but MAGNETO.
  • X-Men Apocalypse: Apocalypse is a big scary dude from ancient times who wants to see the whole world burn. But don't worry! Guess who's still a villain? MAGNETO.

theblackvixen  asked:

(So sorry for posting another so soon, but I had it pop into my head while I was doing dishes and it was too interesting to me not to submit haha!) Murdoc or 2D's approach at coming to their s/o for comfort?

(You can ask as many questions as you want it doesn’t bother me at all!!)

2D:

  • When it comes to you (and sometimes in general) 2D wears his heart on his sleeve, and thus it’s pretty easy to see when he’s feeling down and needs some cheering up. 
  • For the most part he’s honest about he wants; he’ll just straight up tell you to hold him or ask for a kiss to cheer him up. He’ll keep talking for hours and likes when you offer in advice, especially because it proves you’ve been listening to him. 
  • He likes when you hold him and he has his head over your heart, with your fingers running through his hair and soothing his racing mind. There’s nothing better than good old fashioned affection to cure some sadness. 

Murdoc Niccals

  • Murdoc is more conservative when it comes to showing emotions that make him look too vulnerable or weak. It would take an arm and a leg to actually convince him to talk about what’s wrong. 
  • He would actually be sober when he’s upset, which is the first clue that he’s not having a good day/week/month/year/existence. He hates turning to people for comfort but he can’t find the energy to bury himself in booze at the moment either. 
  • For comfort he just wants total silence with you in the room, his head on your lap as you rub his back. Sometimes he’ll just curl up and pass out for a few hours, feeling a bit better when he’s awake again. 

Someone really was like,“ Well look at Brazil! Everyone’s mixed there, and black people still exist!”
Yeah, we’re just gonna pretend Brazil wasn’t all about race-mixing in order to cure blackness life.

A PSA for writers who make canonically hearing characters deaf in AUs or hcs:

  • Deafness/HoH is not a cute trope to increase angst levels. That implies all Deaf people’s lives suck. Which is very not true. 
  • The debate over implants/hearing aids is complicated and getting an implant is not a “"cure”“ for deafness
  • Many Deaf people do not believe their deafness needs to be cured-it’s what makes them part of the Deaf culture (just like being from a certain race/background doesn’t mean you should be ”“cured”“ of it)
  • Why does your Deaf character only have hearing friends? The Deaf AU question that keeps me up at night. 
  • Related: Why the fuck would you date somebody who can barely sign? I’m not saying it doesn’t happen but it seems in fic to be the only thing that ever does. Communication is important in a relationship???
  • Not every Deaf/HoH person is orally (speaking/lip-reading) educated and there are different levels of this skill. 
  • OH MY FUCKING GOD YOU CAN NOT LEARN SIGN LANGUAGE IN A WEEK IT TOOK ME OVER THREE YEARS AND I STILL SUCK
  • You can sign and drive. You can sign when you have a broken wrist. Most Deaf people communicate fine with hearing people that have any willingness to understand them. Stop increasing angst levels with means of stopping communication that don’t actually exist.

And once more bc I can’t say it enough-deafness is not a disease, a death sentence, a complete shut down on all communication ability, or a thing that needs to be cured. It’s a culture and a lifestyle. And always do your research before writing about any disability or culture different from your own.

Thanks. ✌

I like you and you like me

anon ask: How about the reader, a abandoned LMD is struggling with the whole ‘emotion’ thing and doesn’t understand simple customs. Shield wants to destroy her but Daisy protests because the reader is the victim in all of this, the LMD reader gets a job within shield gaining some trust. eventually this leads to a crush from the reader on Daisy and they don’t know what it is or how to fix it. Imagine Curie from Fallout 4 for context.

warning: LMD!Reader

I had a hard time writting this I’M NOT A ROBOT OKAY?. but I liked how it turned out :D

part 2



Being one of the first LMD that the human race created was not very simple. Dr. Radcliff created you with the purpose of help the human race. You were specialized on creating cures for the humans, one of your biggest goals, find the cure for cancer. Dr. Radcliff also want it you to feel, like a human does, and when he actually succeed in this task he was taken back by how much you feel,  the feelings were too much for you. Overwhelming by all these feelings Dr. Radcliff decided to shut you down, till Aida find you. She was amazed by your feelings, she was going to destroy you but Shield stopped her, a certain Agent saved you, a girl named Daisy. Even though Shield wanted to destroy too, Daisy convinced them not to. Radcliff told her about,  a special LMD that could save the human race. Daisy had faith on you, plus she thought that you were just a victim and all this.

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