rabo kunstcollectie

Rezi van Lankveld whips up flurries of pigment in her eerie, mysterious paintings. She favours pallid shades such as lilac, blue or grey, which she swirls with eddies of black to create dense abstractions. They recall the marbled endpapers of 18th-century books. Yet amidst these trippy paint-fests, figures can be glimpsed: rippling, shadowy forms wearing tricorne hats, pinafores or capes. They rise up from the churning colours like the ghosts of painting past.

Rezie van Lankveld, no title (2005)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

2

A sneak in the artist’s studio in 1982. A room filled with all kinds of materials and art works. Look in the mirror on the left and you’ll see a painting similar to another work by Vanderheyden in the Rabo Art Collection (2nd picture). Paintings with tilted horizons, which make you feel lost in space or flying in the air.
Vanderheyden used this photo for a new work of art. He mounted a small ‘horizon’ painting on it. An even stronger visual effect of the room occurs.

‘A room with more than one view’

JCJ Vanderheyden, Cobalt blue horizon in studio (1982-2006)

Rabo Art Collection
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.

Like a storm that blows away everything; leaves, branches and maybe even memories. The intense brush strokes and paint brings your imagination to life.

For Delaere painting is not about aesthetic perfection or completion, he rather aims to involve the viewer into his dynamic work process. The layers of paint and the gestural way in which it is is applied are the subject matter of Delaere’s compelling paintings.

Koen Delaere, Untitled, 2009

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

2

The multidisciplinary work of the Belgian visual artist Hans op de Beeck consists of sculptures, installations, video work, photography, animated films, drawings, paintings and writing (short stories). Thematically, the work concentrates on our laborious and problematic relationship with time, space and each other.

Hans op de Beeck, Extensions (2009)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

A photographic portrait of two young children, two sisters, one has an arm around the shoulder of the other. A loving gesture. But their gaze has strayed and does not suit the pose, it makes them psychologically isolated. They seem so close but also so far apart of each other. 

Loretta Lux, The Irish Girls (2005)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

Contemporary artists Lucy and Jorge Orta have been collaborating since 1991. Their studios are situated in central Paris, The Dairy and Les Moulins two historical buildings, which now house their production studios for the production of their artworks, commissions and limited editions. Parallel and feeding into their studio practice of sculpture and painting, they stage ephemeral interventions, performances, workshops, which explore the crucial themes of contemporary world: the environment and sustainable development, habitat and community, mobility and migration.

Jorge & Lucy Orta, OrtaWater - Vitrine, 2005

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

Instead of a landscape on a scale Delftware, we see in this painting a landscape in a scale. The composition might seem a bit like an opening scene of a horror film: what is going to happen in that castle? Or is it just more of a landscape in a glass ball, which after vigorous shaking snow is swirling. The stylized cloud over the scale seems at first glance a strange element, yet fits perfectly in the picture. The cloud seems subdued drama, inspired by the title, just to relativise.

Rob Scholte, Het tranendal, 1986

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

Take a look at it for a while. A real tree branche shaped into abstraction. Bolink retained all the twigs and details when he turned nature into Mondriaan, and made art history part of his contemporary work of art.

Merijn Bolink, untitled (2005)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

You experience silence. It’s almost a mystical experience. By working with major differences of light and dark and to edit digital photos, arise almost unreal images, as in a fairy tale. Like it’s something unreal and a little bit scary

Desiree Dolron is well known for her travel reports and by her staged photography. She captures secrets of ordinary everyday lives that we would have missed if Dolron had not pointed them out to us. The images are moving and mysterious

Desiree Dolron, Iris, 1995

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

Dumas is often inspired by photographs from newspapers and magazines from her vast archive. The daily flow off the photographic images are, according to the artist, affect the way people look at each other and the world around them. Dumas explores this through in her work to expose the psychological, social and political aspects of these images. Her paintings and drawings have a great immediacy and expressiveness, which she combines with a certain analytical detachment.

Marlene Dumas, Billy (Holiday), 1994

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

“The goal is to become something which I myself no longer in the hand. If I work well, I make something I could never imagine”. 

Marc Mulders is best known for his oil paintings in which he follows the course of nature. In the spring and summer Mulders paints tulips, irises and roses; in autumn and winter, he focuses on wildlife such as pheasants and hares. Both the flowers and the animals he paints from life. He makes still lives with flowers or dead animals but he also uses photos in his studio that serve him for inspiration.

Marc Mulders, zonder titel, 1998

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

A city somewhere in California, in the dark, the sun has set. Looking up we see a bright moon shining. And that’s all we get to see. Hans Broek has left out all details, no recognition of where we are and what we see. A city into abstraction, only the illuminated windows reveiled. Is it a city in the hills or are we looking at sky scrapers? A Slope it is.

Hans Broek, Slope (1999)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

In the early 1970s, Sigurdur Gudmundsson produced a few works that straddle the line between collage, assemblage and still life. Full House is one such work: 2 letters and 2 pieces of soap on a small shelf, framed as a painting. One of conceptual art’s biggest discoveries was that when you replace shapes and colours with actual objects, they add their own impact and meaning to the whole. More importantly, all things can, in a different context, produce new and different meanings ad infinitum.

Sigurdur Gudmundsson, Full House, 1971

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

This work POF 19D, 1986 has the colors of the feathers of a peacock. But it let you also think about the ocean and its secrets. The artist, Peter Struycken has one foot in art history and the other in the world of digital technology. He has been generating his abstract works on computer since 1968. Ever since the early days, he has been using the computer to change colours in shape, structure and tint through complex calculations.

Peter Struycken, POF 19D 1986, (1986)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

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A man photographed while he whispers: ’It’s Alright’.

It’s All Right (Whispering) by Pieter Laurens Mol is a typical 1970s composition. It was a period in which conceptual art propounded the unity of art and life. 

Look at the photos from left to right and whisper the title of the piece to yourself in slow motion. You notice that you are doing the exact same thing as the man in the photograph. Only he is imprisoned within the mute space of the image, while you are free, and can say aloud the reassuring words he is miming: It’s all right. 

Pieter Laurens Mol, It’s All Right (Whispering), (1974)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection