rabo art collection

The title of the work is identical to a series of photographs by Huseyin shot in Odessa, showing curtains blowing in the wind. These images inspired an installation of hardened lace curtains, frozen in time and space. The work refers to the gesture of opening the windows to set free the soul of the deceased, as well as the idea of a spirit present in a room, mysteriously lifting the curtains to reveal its presence.

Gabriel Lester, Melancholia in Arcadia (2011)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

Rezi van Lankveld whips up flurries of pigment in her eerie, mysterious paintings. She favours pallid shades such as lilac, blue or grey, which she swirls with eddies of black to create dense abstractions. They recall the marbled endpapers of 18th-century books. Yet amidst these trippy paint-fests, figures can be glimpsed: rippling, shadowy forms wearing tricorne hats, pinafores or capes. They rise up from the churning colours like the ghosts of painting past.

Rezie van Lankveld, no title (2005)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

Painting in an innovative way when people want traditional. Declaring the art of painting dead just when it’s coming back into fashion. Exhibiting profound social engagement with innumerable models, manifestos and drawings. Only to then return to painting. This was the artistic path of Constant A. Nieuwenhuys (Constant). Against the grain, playful, but with conviction.

Constant, Crowd (1993)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.

Rabo Art Collection

A photographic portrait of two young children, two sisters, one has an arm around the shoulder of the other. A loving gesture. But their gaze has strayed and does not suit the pose, it makes them psychologically isolated. They seem so close but also so far apart of each other. 

Loretta Lux, The Irish Girls (2005)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

There comes a moment when everyday objects lose their sense of familiarity, acquire another meaning and seem to become almost abstract. Such moments are used by Elspeth Diederix as a starting point for her images. Showing the beauty of everyday life, that is what it is all about. 

Elspeth Diederix, Fruit Still Life, 2008

 

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

Church, eyes, glass, big necklace

This art work from Maria Roosen is made from glass. When she is happy about her ideas, they often cooperate with for example, glassblowers. The themes that mostly recur in her work are fertility, growth, the feminine and the masculine. What I like the most about this work are the blue colors and the fact that the eyes are so incredible large. In 2006 Roosen received the Wilhelmina Ring for her entire oeuvre and in 2009 the Singer Prize.

Maria Roosen, Roosenkrans (1997)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

Karel Appel is one of the most prominent figures of his generation in international and Dutch painting. Over nearly sixty years, he built up a strikingly expressive, larger-than-life oeuvre of paintings and sculptures. With such a large oeuvre it should come as no surprise that themes and shapes from earlier phases recur in his body of work. Appel painted innumerable landscapes, nudes and animals.

Karel Appel, Horizon of Tuscany (1995)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

2

Sculptures with a painting-like quality, or paintings occupying space like a sculpture. David Jablonowski sculpts with the eyes of a painter. He approaches the art of contemporary sculpting with the understanding that while it is primarily two-dimensional, fleeting images that dominate today’s world, in fact very little has changed. He draws deep connections between billboards and advertising displays and the primal function of sculpture: ritual, faith, recollection. The collective memories of artworks, and the cultural heritage they communicate, are an inexhaustible source of inspiration.

David Jablonowski, Grabskulptur (2008)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

After studying Photography and Audio/Visual Design at the Willem de Kooning Academy in Rotterdam, The Netherlands (1992), his main focus has been the Urban Landscape in it’s broadest sense. Over the years early influences of the New Topographics have evolved into a diverse oeuvre about the control of landscape, lack of space, infrastructural issues and the pressure on time and space in contemporary metropolises, reflecting our ways of communication and it’s speed.

Frank van der Salm, Intermezzo (2003) 

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection