rabo art collection

Rezi van Lankveld whips up flurries of pigment in her eerie, mysterious paintings. She favours pallid shades such as lilac, blue or grey, which she swirls with eddies of black to create dense abstractions. They recall the marbled endpapers of 18th-century books. Yet amidst these trippy paint-fests, figures can be glimpsed: rippling, shadowy forms wearing tricorne hats, pinafores or capes. They rise up from the churning colours like the ghosts of painting past.

Rezie van Lankveld, no title (2005)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

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A sneak in the artist’s studio in 1982. A room filled with all kinds of materials and art works. Look in the mirror on the left and you’ll see a painting similar to another work by Vanderheyden in the Rabo Art Collection (2nd picture). Paintings with tilted horizons, which make you feel lost in space or flying in the air.
Vanderheyden used this photo for a new work of art. He mounted a small ‘horizon’ painting on it. An even stronger visual effect of the room occurs.

‘A room with more than one view’

JCJ Vanderheyden, Cobalt blue horizon in studio (1982-2006)

Rabo Art Collection
All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.

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Sculptures with a painting-like quality, or paintings occupying space like a sculpture. David Jablonowski sculpts with the eyes of a painter. He approaches the art of contemporary sculpting with the understanding that while it is primarily two-dimensional, fleeting images that dominate today’s world, in fact very little has changed. He draws deep connections between billboards and advertising displays and the primal function of sculpture: ritual, faith, recollection. The collective memories of artworks, and the cultural heritage they communicate, are an inexhaustible source of inspiration.

David Jablonowski, Grabskulptur (2008)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

Like a storm that blows away everything; leaves, branches and maybe even memories. The intense brush strokes and paint brings your imagination to life.

For Delaere painting is not about aesthetic perfection or completion, he rather aims to involve the viewer into his dynamic work process. The layers of paint and the gestural way in which it is is applied are the subject matter of Delaere’s compelling paintings.

Koen Delaere, Untitled, 2009

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

Painting in an innovative way when people want traditional. Declaring the art of painting dead just when it’s coming back into fashion. Exhibiting profound social engagement with innumerable models, manifestos and drawings. Only to then return to painting. This was the artistic path of Constant A. Nieuwenhuys (Constant). Against the grain, playful, but with conviction.

Constant, Crowd (1993)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.

Rabo Art Collection

There comes a moment when everyday objects lose their sense of familiarity, acquire another meaning and seem to become almost abstract. Such moments are used by Elspeth Diederix as a starting point for her images. Showing the beauty of everyday life, that is what it is all about. 

Elspeth Diederix, Fruit Still Life, 2008

 

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

Karel Appel is one of the most prominent figures of his generation in international and Dutch painting. Over nearly sixty years, he built up a strikingly expressive, larger-than-life oeuvre of paintings and sculptures. With such a large oeuvre it should come as no surprise that themes and shapes from earlier phases recur in his body of work. Appel painted innumerable landscapes, nudes and animals.

Karel Appel, Horizon of Tuscany (1995)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

Henk Visch’s love of language underlies the artist’s ever-expanding oeuvre. Since 1980, he has been creating expressions of the world around him in sculptures, drawings and language. ‘As an artist, you are working in a transient domain,’ says Visch. 'You understand that everything exists for only an impossibly brief instant. Everything is a dream that’s gone before you know it, a bird that sings and flies off. But it is at the heart of this transience that you find the moments that something is created. Those are the moments you want to capture. That’s what art is.’

Henk Visch, We ran out of sweets (2010)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.

Rabo Art Collection

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The multidisciplinary work of the Belgian visual artist Hans op de Beeck consists of sculptures, installations, video work, photography, animated films, drawings, paintings and writing (short stories). Thematically, the work concentrates on our laborious and problematic relationship with time, space and each other.

Hans op de Beeck, Extensions (2009)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

A photographic portrait of two young children, two sisters, one has an arm around the shoulder of the other. A loving gesture. But their gaze has strayed and does not suit the pose, it makes them psychologically isolated. They seem so close but also so far apart of each other. 

Loretta Lux, The Irish Girls (2005)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

Contemporary artists Lucy and Jorge Orta have been collaborating since 1991. Their studios are situated in central Paris, The Dairy and Les Moulins two historical buildings, which now house their production studios for the production of their artworks, commissions and limited editions. Parallel and feeding into their studio practice of sculpture and painting, they stage ephemeral interventions, performances, workshops, which explore the crucial themes of contemporary world: the environment and sustainable development, habitat and community, mobility and migration.

Jorge & Lucy Orta, OrtaWater - Vitrine, 2005

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

This work on paper of Heringa/Van Kalsbeek consists of a lot of materials. Besides paint and charcoal they also added resin, rope, fabric and other materials to the paper. Because of this, a three-dimensional image is created. The work claims all the attention with his colors and form. Only after you’ve come closer, you discover all the little details.

Heringa / Van Kalsbeek, untitled, (2004)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection

Instead of a landscape on a scale Delftware, we see in this painting a landscape in a scale. The composition might seem a bit like an opening scene of a horror film: what is going to happen in that castle? Or is it just more of a landscape in a glass ball, which after vigorous shaking snow is swirling. The stylized cloud over the scale seems at first glance a strange element, yet fits perfectly in the picture. The cloud seems subdued drama, inspired by the title, just to relativise.

Rob Scholte, Het tranendal, 1986

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox. 
Rabo Art Collection

Take a look at it for a while. A real tree branche shaped into abstraction. Bolink retained all the twigs and details when he turned nature into Mondriaan, and made art history part of his contemporary work of art.

Merijn Bolink, untitled (2005)

All rights are reserved. Photography by Peter Cox.
Rabo Art Collection