quizzes and tests

💖tips for people starting high school (or even middle school) this year!💖

🍀 if you’re worried about getting lost get a map of the school. i guarantee you every school has a map (they need them in order to plot emergency exit plans) and you can get these either by popping in to your school office and asking the people at the front desk if they have one or by just looking online. mark the location of your classes on the map, jot down your class schedule, and keep it out with you until you can figure out how to get to your classes by memory.

🍀 if you actually do get lost don’t be afraid to ask someone for help. my first day of high school i was walking all over the damn place for a good 20 minutes looking for a classroom before i finally went to the front office and asked for directions (i had somehow entirely missed a wing of the school in my wanderings and that was where the class was, yikes). teachers and other adult staff are the best to ask but if none are around find a kid that looks older than you and ask them. someone will know where you need to go and will be able to point you in the right direction, you just have to be willing to ask them as soon as you’ve realized you have no clue where the hell you’re going instead of walking around like a lost duck for so long like i did.

🍀 write your locker combination down somewhere that’s easily accessible. even if you’re like “ha! it’s only three numbers, i can remember that!” write it down. and if you’re not comfortable or familiar with using combination locks, look up how to use them online - watch a video or two - and maybe write the instructions for which way to turn them down too. it’s not hard but it can be tricky, especially if you’ve never used a combo lock before and you’re already dealing with new school jitters that can throw you off.

🍀 familarize yourself with the rules of your school. your teachers will probably give you a rule booklet on your first day but if not then the rules are likely available to view online. this tip isn’t here to be a buzzkill but to caution practicality: different schools have different rules. some of those rules may be weird, some may be unfair, but in any case it’s always a good idea to know what is/isn’t allowed in your school so you can avoid doing anything that might get you punished (or at least so you’ll know that you should hide what you’re doing so you don’t get caught). specifically be sure you know rules that are about your school’s dress code, their policy on snacks and drinks in the classroom (this may be something you need to ask individual teachers about as well, as different teachers may have different views on this), whether phones or other devices are allowed in school, and if you take any kind of medications (down to an over the counter tylenol or benadryl) whether you’re allowed to bring those or if you need to fill out some kind of form to get permission first.

🍀 buy your own mini pencil sharpener. these were never on any of my school supply lists but they’re one of those things that you’re better off having and not needing than needing and not having (trust me you don’t want to get up and walk all the way across the room during a test or something to use the teacher’s sharpener, they’re big and loud and they annoy everyone).

🍀 make it a habit to write things down! write down all of your homework assignments and any projects, their due dates, and any quizzes/tests your teacher tells you about. also go through your planner and mark out any days that your school will be closed or closing early. some schools give out planners at the beginning of every year (mine did) but if yours doesn’t then buy one for yourself. it doesn’t have to be fancy or anything, they sell decent ones for cheap at stores like dollar tree. just make sure that you use it! it will make your life 100x easier.

🍀 if you’re someone who has a period make sure you have a small bag of necessary supplies with you in your bookbag. include a few pads, tampons, or whatever you use. different schools have different policies on bringing medication (such as ibuprofen, tylenol, or other pain killers you might use for cramps + other period symptoms) so please be aware of what your school’s policy is before you bring a bottle of pills or even a few loose pills to school with you; even if it’s an over the counter drug you can still get in trouble for bringing it to school without permission. if you’re not sure of your school’s policy your best bet is to drop by the school nurse’s office and ask them about it. don’t be too embarrassed to talk about period stuff with them, school nurses have seen/heard everything and they are not going to judge you.

🍀 don’t freak out about where to sit at lunch. seriously. movies and tv shows make a big deal about this (mean girls, anyone?) but in reality it’s just not that big of a deal. if you’re lucky you’ll share a lunch period with people you know and like and will be able to sit with them but if you don’t then don’t worry too much about it, either. try finding a table that seems mostly empty and sit down there. people you don’t know will probably sit with you and this is okay—you’re not obligated to introduce yourself but you’re also not obligated to not introduce yourself either, be polite and maybe smile and say hey if you want or just nom your food and mind your business. these kids are no different from you, they just want to eat, and chances are they’ll be perfectly fine. if you can’t find a mostly empty table, then look for an empty seat next to someone who looks more focused on eating. ask them if you can sit there. 9 times out of 10 they will say yes. sit, eat, wait for the bell, go. repeat the next day. eventually, it’ll just be another part of the routine.

🍀 don’t bring anything expensive to school unless it can fit in your locker (and you’re willing to keep it there) or you know you can keep it with you at all times. i’m not saying your stuff is going to get stolen but i’ve seen it happen before—kid comes to school, shows off their phone or ipod or something, goes to the bathroom leaving the thing unattended, and whoops! it’s gone when they come back. be responsible with your things, especially if they’re things you wouldn’t want to lose. and if you don’t absolutely NEED to bring a thing to school, consider leaving it at home.

🍀 don’t bring drugs, alcohol, weapons, or anything else illegal to school. this is common sense y'all. if you don’t want a police dog to start barking at your locker and to get in some serious trouble then leave the weed at home where the cops actually need a warrant or some kind of probable cause to come in and find it. the school building is not yours and your locker is not yours, it’s the schools. don’t bring anything into the school that you’re not okay with school staff and school cops finding.

🍀 turn your phone off before you go into the school in the morning. there are very few ways to piss a teacher off quite as quickly as having your phone ring while they’re in the middle of speaking or the class is in the middle of a test. not only will they be angry but it’s also just super embarrassing and will probably end up with you getting your phone confiscated. also, don’t text during class. i know it’s tempting but it’s not worth getting in trouble for. keep it off and if you can’t trust yourself to keep it off then keep it at home.

🍀 manage your time between classes wisely. know how much time there is between class letting out and the bell for the next class ringing and know how long it will take you to get to your next class from where you’re at. socializing is good and healthy but don’t burn up all of the time you have between classes hanging out talking to people in the hallway because it can wind up making you late. make sure you pee if you’ve gotta pee and that you have everything you need for your next class.

and for a lot of you beginning middle or high school is usually the first time you’ll have a gym class where you have to change your clothes in a locker room or shower around other students. this can obviously cause a lot of anxiety, especially for those of you who might deal with body image issues so here are a few tips for how to potentially deal with that as well as other locker room tips:

🍀 a lot of gym locker rooms have bathroom stalls attached and you can potentially get changed in those rather than out in the open with everyone else. note that some gym teachers may not be okay with students doing this. if that’s the case then they’ll likely tell you about it on day one of gym class. if they don’t mention it then consider it okay but if they don’t allow people to get changed in the bathroom then you can always slip into a regular school bathroom prior to gym class and change your clothes there and then change into your regular clothes after gym. as long as you manage your time wisely and don’t take too long and wind up late for gym or your next class, you shouldn’t get in trouble for this.

🍀 if you have body image issues about how your upper body looks you can consider wearing a long tank-top underneath your regular clothes and, after you change out of your regular clothes, just put your gym shirt on on top of the tank top. you’re still changing but no one is actually seeing your chest/skin which reduces some of the anxiety.

🍀 if you have body image issues about your lower body or people seeing you in your underwear you can consider wearing boxers or some kind of shorts-like underwear instead of briefs. these cover more skin than briefs do which can, again, reduce anxiety. no matter what your gender identity is there should be some kind of underwear like this in a pattern/color/material that is comfy for you. alternatively, you could also wear thin leggings under your regular pants (though this may not be feasible for you during summer when it’s really hot out).

🍀 if you don’t want to shower after gym, no one can force you. just make sure to have a clean set of clothes to change into, make sure you wear deodorant, and carry a packet of nicely scented wipes in your gym bag to wipe down with after gym is over. maybe also spritz a bit of perfume or scented water in your hair.

🍀 keep a pair of fresh socks in your gym bag. everyone knows to bring their gym clothes but a lot of people forget to bring a pair of clean socks and you really need to. your feet will get sweaty and hot and even if they don’t start to stink it’s still going to be really uncomfortable to wear them until you get home.

🍀 actually wash your gym clothes. YMMV, i don’t know how much y'all sweat or stink, but be sure you wash your gym clothes at least once a week because no matter what your body odor level is they will start to stink after awhile. if your clothes get particularly funky then wash them in a mix of antibacterial soap and baking soda—the soap will kill the germs and the baking soda will make them smell good again.

🍀 and speaking of stink, if your gym shoes start to smell funky buy some baking soda spray and spray the hell out of them too.

🍀 be respectful of other people in the locker room. don’t make comments about other people’s bodies that could make them feel uncomfortable or upset. if you make any kind of mess, clean it up. if the locker room has bathroom stalls attached, don’t hog them - always be aware of how much time you’re spending in there or in front of the mirror and whether there’s anyone standing around who needs to get into a stall or use a sink. and if you use perfume or body spray or any other kind of aerosol, for the love of god and asthmatics everywhere, don’t use too much of it—not to call anyone out but you young dudes out there who are just beginning your manly love affair with AXE body spray need to be especially on notice over this. when i was in middle school boys used so much AXE that you could see the waves of it drifting out of their locker room and making its way across the gym. i know y'all want to smell good but that shit can choke people out, i promise you that you don’t need to use quite THAT much in order to smell nice.

🍀 stand up to bullying and body shaming when you see it happen. if you see something, say something. if another student is being bullied in the locker room, stand up for them. sometimes the only thing it takes for a bully to stop is for other people to tell them to shut the fuck up and make it clear that their behavior isn’t acceptable. reach out to classmates of yours who you see being bullied and body shamed even when you don’t know them. you don’t have to be friends with someone in order to understand that they deserve to be treated with kindness and respect. defend people who are being attacked and taken advantage of and make sure they know that they deserve better.

💖 💖 if i missed anything please feel free to add on to this list!!! 💖 💖

How to get straight A’s in college. Seriously.

Yes, even if you’re taking the maximum credit load. Because if I can do it, you can do it too. Note: My credit load also included a handful of honors courses. 

Side-note: I’m going to be a junior (how??) and an RA (!!!) in the fall. Life moves fast. College moves faster. Anyways, 

Here are my top tips: 

1. LOOK AT THE SYLLABUS AND WRITE EVERYTHING DOWN. This is step number one, and it’s not up for debate. If you do this, there’ll be no surprises, and if there are: point it out to the professor (a simple, ??? this wasn’t on the syllabus ??, usually works). Also, you have to check and see what constitutes as an A in that class. Sometimes it’s a 90, sometimes it’s not. (a 96 was an A- in one of my classes last semester. I’m so serious.)

2. Get a calendar. Not a planner. One of those giant calendars with puppies or something on it and write down everything you have to do for the month. Put it above your desk. This helps A LOT because you can see everything you have coming up for the next few weeks, instead of jus playing it day-by-day. 

3. It is OK to use ratemyprofessor. Sometimes it can be really helpful, but pay attention to the more in depth reviews that talk about what the homework, tests, quizzes and projects are like (instead of “her lectures are boring :///) 

4. Sit in the front of your class. You’ll be more likely to pay attention and less likely to scroll through instagram. (by the way, mine is @parissdb :) It also grabs your professors attention, so even if you’re shy, they’ll at least know your face.

5. Do that extra credit. A lot of professors offer it in the beginning of the semester, and hardly anyone does it because no one’s thinking past tomorrow. It may be what saves you in the long run. 

6. Figure out your best method of note-taking. For me, it’s good ol pen and paper. It helps me remember everything. Some people prefer typing it out. This is beneficial bc it makes it easier for you to find exactly what you’re looking for. (Thank you, command + F)

7. Put your effort into the percentages. If an assignment is worth 1% of your grade, do it well, but don’t exhaust yourself. It’s 1%!!!! If it comes down to it, spend more time studying for that exam that’s worth 30% than the group project worth 20. 

8. Please. Stop studying what you already know. We’re all guilty of it. It makes you feel better knowing you have chapters 1-3 down, even if you don’t know 4-7. The key to studying is to learn what you don’t know. 

9. Learn how to study. (Yes, it’s actually a skill that has to be learned.) I’m the biggest procrastinator I know, especially when it comes to studying. But I’ve found that studying 2 days before an exam usually does the trick for me. I create a master study guide during day 1 and study it all on day 2. Depending on what time the exam is, I may review on the morning of day 3. 

10. SAVE SOME TIME FOR FUN ffs. Seriously. You don’t have to study 24/7, and I don’t know about y’all but my attention span was not built for that.

I might add more to this later, or make another post because I could give these tips for ever and ever. But hopefully this helps someone out there. 

Be sure to check out my college tab here:(http://thesoontobenewyorker.tumblr.com/tagged/college) and follow me on instagram @parissdb (https://www.instagram.com/parissdb/) for more stuff. :) 

A Stash of Tiny Study Tips

STAYING MOTIVATED

  • Create realistic goals: get ___ grade on next ____
  • Manageable let down; get back on track
  • Keep track of grades: focused, know where stand, no surprises
  • Start small
    • Low risk confidence builders
  • Take time to relax/give self rewards
    • Days off, breaks, rewards
    • All work & no play =/= living
  • Little organization goes a long way
  • Reward achievements!
  • Keep balance with exercise, clubs, friends
    • 2h/d: friends and exercise
  • Remember that hard work pays off
    • Isn’t a breeze to try to get a 4.0 GPA; but it’s possible
    • You’re smart enough and can achieve it
    • 90% there with these tips, 10% is just pure hard work
  • Only chill on weekends
    • Monday-Friday: school mode
    • Have time for some fun
    • If work as hard as should during week, will need weekends to blow off steam
  • Be self-motivated
    • Grades can matter, not everything, but follow through on what needs to be done
    • Not most important part of college but underperform? You will regret it
    • GPA cutoffs exist and matter to employers
    • College is full of distractions and opportunities
    • Nobody will hold hand and the work will suck but all the prouder of yourself to be
      • Suck it up, buckle down, get it done
        • If think need break, probably don’t
  • Turn off the little voice
    • Realize not alone in questioning ability
    • Avoid people who tend to burst bubbles no matter what 
  • Physical triggers to stop
    • Incentive to get something done when know have something else during the day
    • Don’t have a gaping abyss of study time
  • Work has to get done, in the end
    • Books, examiners, and especially your future self isn’t going to care about your excuses for not doing the work
    • Take the first step
      • It will almost be fictional how hard you thought the task was going to be
      • Just keep going because you simply can’t afford NOT to do anything today, nonzero days
      • Leeway, don’t give your perfectionism control over your life

MUNDANE HABITS

  • Sleep! Think and function, mind & body
    • CAN sleep if keep up with coursework instead of procrastinating
    • Will miss out on some fun stuff
    • Need to stay awake in class
    • Figure out what need for full speed
    • Stay relaxed
  • Stay physically healthy
    • Diet and exercise
    • 1 hour exercise during week
    • Weekends off
  • Traditional breakfast not necessary if value extra sleep
  • Systematic habits: neat, prepared
  • Master material
    • Look for real world applications
    • Learning is a process: be patient, don’t expect to master off the bat
  • Designate study area and study times
  • Do trial runs
    • Practice tests
    • Ask a TA to listen to your oral performance
    • Study groups
  • Don’t copy other people’s psets and solutions

BEFORE SEMESTER

  • Spiral bound notebook, can color code with folders/etc if need be
    • Lecture notes: front to back
    • Reading notes: back to front (if fall behind on)
    • Seminar notes: mixed in with lecture notes, different pen color/labeled
    • Outline format
      • Bullet points for everything
    • Same NB for one set of class notes, separate notebooks for all classes
  • 5-subject notebook
    • Midterm and exam material in it
    • Mesh sources, study guide
    • All study material from week/month in one place
  • Pick the right major
    • Indulge in favorite hobby feeling
  • Pick professors & classes wisely
    • Take a small class
    • Pick classes that interest you so studying doesn’t feel torturous
      • Want to learn

GRADES SPECIFIC

  • Prioritize class by how can affect GPA
    • More credits: more weight
  • Work enough to get an A in your easy classes: take something good at
    • Don’t settle, don’t slack off, don’t put in minimal effort to get that B/C. Just put in a tiny bit more effort to ensure A
    • Will have harder classes and need to counteract
  • Take electives can ace
    • Anything but an A in an elective is kinda mean and an unnecessary hit for your GPA

FIRST DAY/WEEK/HALF OF CLASSES

  • Get to know teaching style: focus most on, lecture/notes
  • Pick and follow a specific note taking format
    • Outline
    • Date each entry
    • Capture everything on board
  • Decide productivity system
    • Google Cal
    • Todoist
    • Agenda: remind meetings, class schedule, important dates/midterms/quizzes/tests, no homework 
      • Always wanted to be prepared
      • Rarely last minute
      • Have plan, stay focused
    • Homework notebook
      • Good redundancy
  • Study syllabus
    • Know it thoroughly
    • Plot all due dates after class
    • Penalize if fail to abide by
  • Study the hardest for the first exam
    • Seems counterintuitive
    • Hardest/most important test
    • Pay attention to content and formatLess pressure: just need ___ on final to keep my A 
    • Easy to start high and keep high
  • Go into crunch mode at the beginning
    • End softly
    • Get plenty of sleep, exercise, and good food in the finals days before the exam

DURING SEMESTER: PEOPLE

  • Get to know professors: go to office hours, care about grades/course/them
    • Easier ask for help, rec letter
    • Get to know interests and what they think is important
    • Figure out their research interests, 60% of their job is research
    • Learning is dynamic
    • Discussion helps
  • Get feedback early when not sure what doing
    • Take comments constructively
  • Consistent class participation: ask questions, give answers, comment when appropriate
    • Understand material
  • Find a study buddy in each class: don’t have to study with
    • Somebody can compare notes with, safety net
    • Pick somebody who attends, participates, and take notes regularly
    • Make some friends
  • Participate as fully as can in group activities
    • Be involved
    • Learn – not be taught
  • Be punctual
    • Good impression, on human professors
    • DON’T BE LATE
  • Skipping class =/= option: It’s “cool” to get attendance award
    • Make all the classes: it’s hard to feel confident when missing key pieces
    • Get full scope of class, everything will make a lot more sense and save a lot of time in long run
    • Mandatory class: higher graduating cumulative GPA
    • Go to class when no one else does/want to show up, reward
    • Get to know professor, what’s on test, notice, r/s build, material not in reading
    • Unless optional and super confusing professor
  • Sit in one of the first rows
    • Don’t fall asleep
    • Fake interest if you have to
  • Tutors

DURING SEMESTER: THINGS TO DO

  • Take notes! Provided is bare minimum, accessed by students who aren’t attending lecture
    • Based on lecture and what read –> test; it’ll be worth it
    • Write it down
    • By hand
    • Bored? Doodle instead of going online
  • Read all assigned–even if need to skim
    • Seems cumbersome and maybe impossible
    • Figure out what’s important
    • Look at the logical progression of the argument/what’s important/what trying to prove
    • Understand everything that you do read–even if don’t read everything
    • PIck 2 examples from text per topic
  • Complete course material on time
    • DO NOT WAIT UNTIL DAY BEFORE IT IS DUE
    • Begin as soon as possible
      • Sometimes it’s just straight up impossible
    • Have it look attractive
  • Library doesn’t just mean = study
    • Social media in the library is still social media
  • Confusion is terrible
    • Read other textbooks, review course material @ another uni/by another professor, google the shit out of it
  • Review
    • Do not wait, do throughout semester
  • Exam prep
    • Ask for model papers, look at style & structure, thesis, how cite
    • Get old tests
      • Look at type of questions (detail level and structure)
      • Can solve old exams cold
      • If give out paper exams in class: probs won’t repeat questions, focus more on concepts but still learn the questions
    • Have class notes and psets down cold
      • Do all the practice problems
      • Read through notes a few times; rewrite into a revision notebook
        • Highlight major topics and subtopics
        • Different highlighter for vocab terms
        • Overall picture, go from concept to detail
          • Look at overall context and how specific idea fit into whole course
          • Ideas, don’t memorize all your notes
    • Better understand = more able to use and manipulate info and remember it. Understand = manipulation.
      • Charts, diagrams, graphs
      • Lists
      • Practice drawing labeled structures
      • Flash cards for memorization
        • Every school requires some degree of grunt memorization
        • Say it aloud, write it down
        • Get friends to quiz you
      • Self-test: severely challenge self, have a running collection of exam questions
      • Explain difficult concepts to your friends; force yourself to articulate the concept
    • Never pull an all-nighter
      • Do not spend every hour studying up to the exam
      • Eat, shower, sleep
    • Don’t wait until night before exam to study
      • Prep takes time even if reviewed throughout semester
    • Ask about format–don’t ask the professor to change it for you
    • Law of College: it will be on the exam if you don’t understand it
      • Ask professor, internet, textbooks
  • Night before exam
    • Jot what want to remember/have fresh
    • Read through in morning/before exam
    • Physical prep
      • Sleep, have test materials
  • Day of exam
    • Don’t cram every single spare minute
    • Go to bathroom before exam
    • Never miss an exam/lie to get more time
      • You won’t be any more ready 2-3 days after when supposed to have taken it
  • Slay exam. Get A. 

WEEKLY 

  • Friday morning: go through each syllabus, write down in HW notebook
  • All hw during weekend; study/reading assignments during week
  • Save everything
  • Divide big tasks into small pieces to help propel self
  • Standard study schedule: block off lectures, labs, regular commitments
    • Note the weeks that have assignments and tests that will require extra studying
    • Don’t oscillate too heavily every day with study times (i.e. don’t study 2-3 hours for weeks and then 10-12 hour days right before an exam)
    • Eat and sleep to make more extended work periods liveable and enjoyable

DAILY

  • Set an amount of time would like to study every day
    • Try to study most days
    • Avoid vague/zoned out studying –> waste of time
    • Do a little bit daily but don’t let studying be your whole day
  • Review notes: 30mins/day, each class from that day
    • Look at important ideas/vocab
      • Prioritize new vocab because language is most fundamental and important tool in any subject
      • Circle abbreviations and make yourself a key somewhere so you don’t forget what the hell that abbreviations meant
      • Check spelling
    • Rewrite/reorganize notes if necessary
      • Format of ideas is just as important as the concepts themselves, esp. when it comes time for exam review
    • This helps you retain the material so you’ll be ahead next time you walk into class
    • Chance to ID any knowledge gaps that you can ask about for next class
  • Keep up with reading
    • Skim text before lecture or at least main topic sentences
    • Jot down anything don’t understand; if lecture doesn’t clarify, ask the professor
    • After lecture: skim again, outline chapter, make vocab flashcards
    • Highlight similar class and lecture notes
      • will definitely be tested on
    • Review and make study questions
  • Study
    • Disconnect from anything irrelevant to study material: help focus and your GPA
    • Don’t limit studying to the night
      • Study whenever, wherever between classes
        • Variety helps focus and motivation
      • Especially if tired at night and can’t transition between subjects
    • Try to study for a specific subject right before/after the class
2

folkin’ around // panic! at the disco

PLANNING YOUR WEEK

Start early!

  • Planning your week should start Saturday night. The week officially begins on Sunday, and Saturday night is the day to figure out everything that will be happening. By doing this, you do not have to spend meaningless time on the Sunday which commences your week with tasks such as planning. Everything should already be planned.

Find out what is on your plate for the upcoming week

  • Look at your school’s portal, or the syllabus, whatever your instructors use to inform you of tests, quizzes, essays and other assessments. Write down what is coming up this week!!! Know everything there is to know about what will be on your plate.

Use color

  • Color is an extremely effective categorization tool. It can allow you to distinguish between tests, quizzes, essays, homework assignments, extracurricular activities, health, personal activities, and more. Assign a color to each subsection of your plan, and create a key so you’re aware of what’s happening. Stay true to this color key, and don’t stray from it.

Prioritize

  • Your plan should feature the most important things to complete and the least important. However, your plan should also establish a general understanding of the ranking system these assignments fall under. If you have a very important test coming up which will count for a large portion of your grade, it should be featured earlier in and stressed more clearly in your plan. Utilize highlighters to clarify the importance level of different assignments.

Make time parameters

  • Making a plan is very important, but assigning time blocks to the plan is arguably even more important. Consider what you do every day after school. Think about how much you do after every day, and at what times you will be doing homework. Consider the length of time it takes to complete each assignment. Then, assign time blocks to each assignment. For example, you could assign “English Essay” for 4 pm - 6 pm, then “Break” from 6 pm - 6:30 pm, then “Math Worksheet” from 6:30 pm - 8 pm. This will keep you on track and going to sleep at a reasonable time.

Leave time for fun

  • It cannot be all school all the time - it is not healthy or conducive to effective living. Leave time for fun and breaks. This can manifest in reading a nice book in between assignments, or planning a hangout session with friends during the week. You only get one childhood, and you can NOT spend the entirety of it in academic mania.

Feature your extracurriculars and appointments

  • When you plan out everything, you have to include e v e r y t h i n g. This means that you must feature any meetings you have for extracurricular commitments, doctors appointments, personal appointments and more. This will ensure your plan is truly accurate.

Make copies!!!

  • Put your plan EVERYWHERE. There should be a copy in your planner, a copy in your bullet journal (if you have one), a copy on your desk, a copy on your mirror, and more. Put the plan anywhere you look often, and anywhere it won’t be drowned by other things.

U S E I T

  • Do not ignore the plan, now that you’ve spent all this time making it. Put it to good use! Keep it with you. Love it, learn it, and make it again next Saturday.

Hi everybody! I’ve gotten a couple of requests for this post, so I thought I’d finally put together my process for making a weekly spread!

Disclaimer: This is simply a system I find to be simple and doable for everyday life. By no means is this the only way or the best way to bullet journal! It’s just a way that I find to be realistic and aesthetically pleasing. 

Before we start: most of my layout is based on @studypunked’s and the moodboard I used was made for me by @sapphiccstudies! 

Supplies I used: Hardcover black Moleskine (grid paper); Green Mildliner; Pilot Hi-Tec-C 05 gel pen; Pony Brown stickers; Clear tape

Step 1: Decide on a color scheme! I always choose a monthly theme (for example, January’s was outer space and March’s was plants). Then, for each week I choose a subtheme! (ex. the first week of January was moon phases.) Then, I choose a Mildliner color that matches the theme. This week, I used a pink moodboard with green accents, so I used a green mildliner! 

Step 2: Weekly planning

I list the week number at the top of the page, and underneath that I put the dates within the week. (This has no purpose other than making me feel organized.) Then, below that I like to make a little monthly calendar (because it’s surprisingly often that I need to know what day of the week a certain date is!) Finally, below that I have a weekly schedule. This is where I write the dates of any tests, quizzes, projects, holidays, birthdays, etc! Generally, these are transferred from my monthly event calendar.

Step 3: Weekly tasks

This step makes my job pretty easy throughout the week! It’s as simple as listing the date and then making check boxes next to any tasks for the week. (This way, I don’t have to worry about much on days when I’m busy.)

Step 4: Finding images

Finally, the weekend rolls around and I’m ready to get into the fun stuff! Usually, here’s where I scour Google Images (I like to use the keywords ‘tumblr’ and ‘aesthetic’ along with my chosen color and theme) for pictures, but this week was easy for me thanks to a moodboard :)

Step 5: Drawings

After choosing my images (usually three, but it’s summer and I don’t have many tasks so I used six) I draw some stuff that goes with the theme in anywhere there will be empty space. Sometimes I also look for quotes and get a little prwctice with typography!

Step 6: Arrange and paste images


I play around with the layout of the images until I find the arrangement I like best, then use little loops of scotch tape to paste them down (usually straight but sometimes crooked if I’m feeling artsy)

Bonus Step: Add Stickers!

I only sometimes do this, but the gist of this is “put them wherever you want, but not too many because stickers are expensive.”

And Voilà! Here’s the finished product:

okay, but everyone portrays Trini as “I couldn’t give less of a fuck about school” but… do you remember Spinelli from that Recess animated show? She acted as if she failed every assignment but she actually had grades similar to Gretchen… What if Trini was secretly the biggest nerd (besides Billy of course) and they all find out when they show up in Trini’s house unannounced and her mom, overly excited leads them to a small studio room where Trini studies, that is incredibly organized, yellow accents, sunflowers by the window and a lot of yellow post its on the wall, pretty notes and a lot of books, the tests, quizzes and assignments that had been returned to her in a stash and they all can see she mainly has As? And that becomes the target of the rest of the rangers teasing and Trini becomes Kimberly’s personal biology tutor, in which Kim is great at but uses it as an excuse to spend time with Trini.

how i organize
  •  one-subject notebooks. 
    • These saved my life. I know everyone’s always saying to keep your stuff in one place and keep track of it all at once, and the way to do that is (apparently) thick, 5-subject looseleaf notebooks and 3″ binders. These have never worked for me, and here’s why: the larger the notebook, the more it catches and rips and doesn’t close right. 
    • Plus, the larger the notebook, the longer you use it, and the longer it has to survive that wear and tear! (Bonus: without having to worry about the notebook being destroyed, I also don’t have to buy the more expensive and durable brands; now I only pay for quality of paper and pretty colours!)  
    • So, I use one-subject notebooks for each class and go through multiple (I’ve never noticed a significant cost difference). A single one-subject notebook lasts me 4-6 units, or about one quarter/half a semester. When I complete a notebook, I simply begin the next, and carry only the newest one with me places. The previous notebooks are kept in my study space so I can always reference them as though it’s one large book, and I rarely need the previous chapters for in-class work. 
    • I start with one notebook per class plus one notebook purely for scribbles or rip-out looseleaf paper, and keep a supply of empty notebooks at my permanent study space.
  • central grade collection. 
    • I do this because it’s easy to reference back to. Soooo many terrible teachers who simply don’t trust their students. Feels nice to whip out a test to prove you were right (and aced it!). Calculating the grade myself makes me more aware of what’s going on with my academics. My biggest downfall this year was not paying attention to my grades!
    • I used to use an accordion folder for this, but this year I’m going to try combining that with a digital file.
    • Whenever I receive a grade back, the paper copy goes in a physical folder and the percentage/grade itself goes onto a file on my computer.
    • The physical folder is organized by classes. As I receive grades back, the newest goes in the front, so each class is naturally ordered chronologically. I tried organizing it further by putting flags to tell apart tests, quizzes, essays, etc. It worked well but eventually I just didn’t bother.
    • The computer file is actually multiple files (again, one for each class). An excel spreadsheet or a simple word doc works well. I specify the material as much as possible (for example, “Unit 1: Trig. Quiz 1: Identities. Date: 7-4-2015″ using both words and numbers) so I can easily search for it later. Next to it goes the numerical and letter grade. I’m thinking of incorporating a note-taking system as well, listing what went wrong and such.
    • This sounds like a lot of work, but it takes very little time and is well worth it. Logging the grades take about 5 minutes, tops. I often find myself putting off work by organizing grades. Obviously it’s hard to log things instantly, so I keep a stack of “to be graded” on my desk until I get around to it.
    • Oh, and keep the physical folder safe in your room/dorm. Carrying it around for spiteful moments is not worth the risk of losing all your grades!
  • separate days.
    • I don’t know about you, but my school has something similar to a block schedule. Monday, Wednesday, Fridays all have the same classes. Tuesdays and Thursdays have the same classes as well. My method works for real block scheduling, too, for even/odd or on/off days. I once had a chronic problem of bringing in the wrong day’s homework. Not anymore!!
    • Basically, just keep the two workpiles separate.
    • I have two cabinets on my desk: one for MWF classes, one for TTh classes. On my desk at all times are my “daily” tools: laptop, charger, planner, pencil pouch, water bottle, etc.
    • In the morning, I always put my dailies in first so I don’t forget, then I check the calendar. Tuesday? Shove in the TTh stack. It’s as simple as that.
    • When actually doing my homework, obviously, prioritize. There isn’t a hardfast “do your homework the day you get it” rule, especially since studying is a process! But when nothing’s especially urgent and I don’t have a favourite assignment, I literally flip a coin.
  • computer files have to be neat.
    • I have so many subfolders I don’t know what to do with them.
    • Separate everything, again, and again, and again. And label it all to hell and back. You can never have a file title that’s too long.
  • You know how you can make multiple accounts on your computer? Admin vs user? Yeah, do that.
    • Make your admin account your free-time, slacker account.
    • Make your user account your work account.
    • Make all the settings admin-only accessible. Don’t get distracted by downloading random crap while doing your homework. Put restrictions on internet usage, gameplay, etc. To get distracted, you have to make the effort to enter an admin password every time you get off task.
    • Bonus: during presentations, you never have to worry about accidentally opening something embarrassing. Everything embarrassing should be in your personal account!
  • Lastly: don’t stress! 
    • When I stress, everything gets disorganized. My mind gets cluttered and so does the rest of my life. I used to stress so hard about grades.
    • If you don’t think you can make the deadline, don’t. One grade is not worth a night of sleep and mental health.
    • If the grade is super important (not all grades are like this: prioritize!) work on it as hard as you can. Don’t stress; put all that stressful energy into the work. Focus your ass off. If you can’t do that, it’s time to stop.
    • Talk to the teacher the next day. Take responsibility for your mistake. Apologize, and do not give excuses. Show to your teacher that you care more about the learning than the grade; it will pay off in the long run.
    • The day after missing a huge assignment is rough. Don’t let it get to you! Dwelling on this assignment only sets you up for failure on any other assignments you have that day. Focus on those and not on what you did wrong. Have yourself a good break, snack, jog, and get back in there. The world isn’t over!
Attraction (Jason Todd x Reader)

Request: “#9 from the 76 OTP prompts thing. Can I have it be Jason?” from @shadowalex2000

Prompt: Imagine your OTP studying together, and for every question answered right, somebody has to take off a piece of clothing. 

A/N: I fucking enjoyed writing this.

*Warnings: Nudity. No sex tho.

Tags: @wynterrobin @wannabe-weasley @avengerdragoness @kazuha159 @scarletsmaximoff @insideoflit @jxsontxdds


~

You were stuck in a very tough situation. History was never your cup of tea. This afternoon your History teacher had to talk to you in private. Apparently, if you don’t pass the next upcoming test, you’re going to fail for the year. 

You hated studying. You just never had any motivation to study. Your teacher only gave you one option, find a tutor or fail. Simple as that.

You took matters into your own hands. The most intelligent and the most charming guy in your class. The guy you have the biggest crush on was your only hope, Jason Todd. 

What if he doesn’t even like me? What if he thinks I’m stupid? What if he says no? Your mind was racing as you walked up to him, his back facing you. He was getting ready to leave on his motorcycle. This was your only chance.

You called his name just before he revved up the engine. He cursed, wondering why would someone waste his time but when he turned and saw it was you, he gave you a warm smile, “Hey, what’s up, (y/n)?”

You gulped. Gosh, he’s so beautiful. You couldn’t believe he even knew your name, “Um…I was wondering if you could help me study for next weeks test?” You almost patted our back for not stuttering in front of him. 

His eyebrows shot up, “Yeah sure, no problem. Wanna come over to my place this weekend?”

You didn’t trust yourself to speak again, so you just nodded in response. Jason grinned and reached into his backpack for a pen and ripped out a small piece of paper. He scribbled something down and handed you the paper. 

You flinched, feeling a spark of electricity when your fingers touched, “That’s my number and my address. Let me know what time you’re coming over,” You let out a small thanks as he put his helmet on, “And by the way, (y/n), I have a…different way of studying. Just giving you a heads up.”

You couldn’t tell what he meant by that. Before you could ask, he revved up his motorcycle and sped off down the street. 

~

You texted Jason saying that you’ll be at his place on Saturday at 8:00 PM(20:00). You were now standing in front of his door, trying to knock but your anxiety held you back from doing so.

When you finally got the guts to knock, the door flew open. Jason was wearing a red pullover hoodie and gray sweatpants, “Hey.” He smiled, gesturing you to come inside.

You sucked in a deep breath and walked inside. You made your way to his living room, with him following behind you, and sat on his couch, placing your bag on the floor.

Jason sat across from you on his other couch. On top of his coffee table laid piles of paper. Probably his notes, quizzes, and tests. You mentally thanked the coffee table for separating the both of you. You knew you would faint if you sat closer to him, “So, when do we start?” You asked, letting out a shaking breath.

He chuckled, “I gotta lay down the rules first.” You mentally cursed. You forgot about him mentioning his different way of studying. You slowly nodded your head after realizing you didn’t let him continue.

Keep reading

I hear day in and day out of public shooled high schoolers whining about pop quizzes and such but

with online school

there are tests

every day.

You do the lesson, you take the quiz. Every single lesson, every single day. No exception. Ever. That’s PLUS the homework and projects and research and face-to-face meet-ups. Not to mention we have mid-unit tests which are like forty questions. Then unit tests which are 50. Then unit tests PART TWO which are papers we have to print out, do, scan and send it.

You wanna whine about quizzes?

Do online school.

TIPS FOR HIGH SCHOOL FRESHMEN (and other high schoolers!)                                     

(first year, first grader, 大一, 신입생, 新入生, étudiant de première année…)

these tips may be slightly sarcastic and what you did not expect but it’s the truth!

  • its only the beginning
  • DO YOUR HOMEWORK. DON’T PROCRASTINATE. PLEASE.
  • if your school has a block schedule (every other period, for ex: per. 1/3/5/7 on monday and per. 2/4/6 on tuesday), do your homework the day it’s assigned!
  • when you come home, whether after practice or just straight from class, don’t sleep (hahaha says the person who sleeps right after), have a snack, relax for 15-30 minutes then do homework. then, you can do whatever you want after :)
  • actually write in your planner what your homework is unless your teacher posts it online…but still write it down in case of technical difficulties
  • if your school has “tutorial” (a time where you can ask your teachers for help, etc.), go to tutorial and ask for help … or eat your lunch
  • drink h2o. very important.
  • eat breakfast. it’ll get you going through the day if you skip lunch for some reason.
  • get enough sleep, if it’s 9 pm and you are done with everything, dont stay on your phone for the next 3 hours like me! SLEEP.
  • start studying for tests/quizzes at least 3 days before but worst case scenario cram the night before lol sorry can’t help you out on that one but yes study as soon as you know there’s a test or quiz coming up
  • don’t plagiarize! if your teachers use turnitin.com, its very good at finding out your little internet discoveries, at the very most paraphrase
  • join clubsssssssss! if you go with your friends it’s even more fun! freshman year is great for going to a gazillion clubs even if my sophomore year you only end up going to like 2
  • finals week: start reviewing your notes a week or two before, but tbh if you do better when you cram then cram! everyone has different study habits and honestly if you’re a crammer, simply review your notes briefly a week before but the day before the final, start hardcore cramming right after school
  • when it’s the end of the school year, please don’t do homework the period before ..it’ll only stress you out
  • make study guides. make flashcards. make quizlets. make a study tool you’ll learn from. share with your friends, don’t be mean :) JK haha share with the people you trust and won’t share with the whole school
  • if you’re in the u.s., don’t start sat prep freshman year lmao…freshman year is a year to have fun not sit in a prep class for 4.5 hours every week!
  • by having fun i do not mean yolo-ing your grades, still attempt to reach dem high grades
  • make friends! old ,new ,recyclable reusable (haha jk)…introduce yourself to new people or just make friends through friends if you’re shy
  • go to school dances and school football games!
  • don’t be scared of upperclassmen we don’t bite :) (unless it’s right before a test)
  • DO. NOT. CHEAT. middle school may be lenient but high school is not.
  • don’t skip classes when there’s a test because you did not study for the said test because instead of taking the test right then and there, you now have to spend time trying to figure out when you can take the test
  • date if you want to but make sure it doesnt take over your studying/school
  • don’t forget to spend time with your family because they are numba 1!
  • for anyone with long hair that gets in the way: tie up your damn hair when you take a quiz/test/final
  • ask questions and don’t be like the deathly silent corner-sitting person i am right now in english
  • do extra credit that the teachers give you because that may not happen in the later sad (jk…i think) years of high school
  • bring your teachers kleenex, expo markers, etc., because who knows you might get a homework pass or sumthing ;)
  • high five people if they try to high five you even if theyre strangers (lmao based on personal experience which i failed)
  • don’t pull an all-nighter/half all nighter where it consists of you starting and finishing a project due the next day, or you’re just on your phone 24/7
  • please don’t do drugs in the back of the school
  • don’t compare yourself to other people :)
  • talk to your counselor / ta (homeroom) teacher!
  • don’t try to force yourself to be friends with popular people, just stay comfortable with the friend group you already have :)
  • if spending 30 minutes on makeup makes you feel good, do it and own it
  • when people cuss and you don’t cuss don’t look scandalized it’s kind of the norm (oops)
  • if you make a mistake/get a bad grade, don’t beat yourself over it. just move on. like after breakups.
  • don’t gossip about other people because they’re going to somehow find out and ignore you for a long time
  • if you’re dressing like a bum by the second month of school, don’t worry life is life
  • volunteer! with friends! by yourself! try to volunteer someplace where it’s every week and not just random places
  • do not cry over a low a because the student next to you that got a low b may feel like smacking you
  • don’t complain about one test and sleeping at 11 pm to an upperclassmen because… just don’t
  • bring a phone charger it’ll save you if you’re staying at school till 9pm that day for tech or something
  • don’t ditch class you ain’t a senior just yet
  • last of all: BE HAPPY

what a huge masterpost! but i hope it helps! freshman year was the best year of my life compared to sophomore year and now and i really wish that i followed the advice that i just gave!

(sorry this is kind of late and this is based on the experiences of my friends and moi)

[09.24.16] … {26/100 days of productivity}

Little Monster part 6

MASTERLIST

Pairing: Professor!Steve Rogers x reader

Warnings: Foul language, mentions of sex but without explicit content. If this isn’t your cup of tea, please skip!

Word count: 1.571

Summary: Professor Steve doesn’t know what to do with himself.

A/N: I’ve been suffering from serious writer’s block. All I can seem to get on the page is crap. This is my attempt at restoring the balance and getting myself out there again. Hope you like it.

Part 1 - Part 2 - Part 3 - Part 4 - Part 5

Keep reading

Dating Peter Parker Would Include:

- You two meeting at school.
- He was a bit of a shy butterfly when you first met him, but he quickly loosened up when he noticed your Star Wars tee and you smiled at him.
- He’s super romantic and will just randomly bring you flowers.
- You two often observe the night sky together on rooftops because why not.
- Marathoning Star Wars together.
- Discussing the Star Wars films and which is your favorite.
- Helping each other study for quizzes and tests.
- He tutors you on science and maths.
- You tutor him on English and history.
- You two are constantly talking. Be it in person, by call, FaceTime, Skype, or text.
- Both being awkward yet cute.
- You learning more about technology from him.
- You not putting up with any lone wolf crap from him.
- Knowing that he’s Spiderman before he tells you because you recognized how they move and talk similarly.
- A lot of cuddles, cheek and forehead kisses, holding hands… Cute stuff.
- He blushes a lot and you flirt with him very often just to cause it.
- Aunt May adoring you.
- Tony adoring you.
- Being BFFs with Ned. - Being a part of the Midtown High School Science Team. - Mitigating Flash and his interactions with Peter. - You go directly to Peter’s after school and hang out there most of the time on weekends too. You practically live there.
- “I love you” is said in pretty much every other sentence.
- You two nerding out together.
- You help tend to Peter’s wounds so he doesn’t scare the stuffing out of Aunt May.
- You help come up with excuses for him whenever he is late to an event or if he shows up with an injury.
- You pretty much are what keeps him grounded and focused on normal life.

DISCLAIMER- As usual, I do not own any of the characters mentioned and you are you. Please don’t sue me.

What I Wish I’d Known Freshman Year (a.k.a. How to Survive Your First Year of High School)

I’ve been thinking about making this post for a while now and have gotten some asks about freshman year so without further ado, here it is. Freshman year considered the worst year of high school by most. You’re young, nervous, and stuck in this big new building with big and ‘scary’ upperclassmen and have probably heard all these rumors and stories about the teachers and how hard they are. It’s definitely a confusing time but fear not, it’s not as bad as it seems!

  • Grades matter but it’s not life and death. Grades are important. Most colleges only look at your GPA from grades 9-11 and possibly first semester senior year so you’re looking at freshman year grades being worth as much as 33% of the GPAs colleges see. That’s a lot. So please don’t take grades as a joke and not study/not take things seriously. You could jeopardize your college chances or make it really difficult to rebound. With that being said, it’s ok to get a B or two and to struggle a bit. You’re getting used to a new schedule and a new class rigor so some stumbling is to be expected. Just don’t dig yourself into a hole you won’t be able to get out of. Show up to class on time, do your homework, take notes, study hard for tests, and ask for help if you need it.
  • Be nice to your teachers. There’s this idea that if you get along with your teachers you’ll be ostracized as the teacher’s pet. That is not true (and anyone who thinks that has no idea what they’re saying). Being the “teacher’s pet” or nice to teachers isn’t a bad thing. See, freshman year teachers are stuck having classes full of squirrely and immature 14 year olds who make their life difficult. Wouldn’t it be nice if there was one student in the class who was nice to them and appreciated what they do? If you’re nice to your teachers, they’re much more likely to be more lenient with you if you have some outside issues that affect your school work, they’ll be eager to help you, and you’ll do much better in the class. Most teachers are smart, kind, and interesting people that are definitely worth knowing. I can’t tell you how much it’s helped me during high school that I was friends with my French teacher from freshman year and my junior and senior year English teacher who helped me with my college apps and valedictorian speech. You’ll benefit more than you know.
  • Make a friend in every class. Because you’re just starting out, you most likely won’t know that many people. There’s nothing worse than the feeling of having to choose partners for a project or activity and you don’t know anybody. Thus, you should make an effort to get to know a person in each one of your classes. It’s a good way to make new friends and they’ll be super helpful if you miss a day and need to get the homework. I met one of my best friends freshman year in biology so who knows, you could meet your future best friends too.
  • Don’t be stupid. And by that, I mean don’t party hard, experiment with hard drugs (or any drugs for that matter), and don’t get drunk. You’re young and I know it seems cool to get drunk or stoned, but it can negatively affect your schoolwork, health, and social life. It’s not worth it. You’ll have time later to experiment and have fun but freshman year of high school is not a good time to do so. Let’s not mention the numerous legal consequences if you’re caught underage with drugs or alcohol and how detrimental they can be towards your future.
  • Get involved. I know you’re new and probably have no idea what you want to do with your life yet (and if you do, it will most likely change as you go through high school) but find activities both inside and outside of school that you think you’ll enjoy. Some ideas are sports teams, student council, volunteering, clubs etc. It’s not only starting to prepare your college resume (although you shouldn’t be worrying about college apps yet) but also helping you make new friends and discover what you’re really into. Don’t be afraid to join something for whatever reason. Chances are, everyone’s nervous because it’s freshman year and they don’t know anybody so you’re all in the same boat.
  • Be organized. This will help you all throughout high school and getting a system set freshman year will only work in your favor. First, get a planner or agenda. Write down all of your homework, tests, quizzes, and projects and when they’re due and any other events like club meetings or practices so you’ll know what your week looks like. It will prevent forgetting anything important and will help you manage your time. Also find a study system that will work for you. Experiment with different note taking and study methods until you find one that works for you. And finally, don’t eat the elephant a.k.a. don’t leave your homework for Sunday night. It’s not fun and you’ll tire yourself out. Be proactive and get things done early.
  • Make friends with the upperclassmen. They will help you more than you know. I know they look intimidating, but talk to them! Most of them are super nice and can help you get to know your high school better, give you gossip, and you’ll look super cool talking to your upperclassmen friends. Truthfully, up until junior year, I got a long better with the upperclassmen than kids my grade because they were more mature.
  • Relationships don’t matter. It sounds harsh but it’s true. You’re not going to be together with your freshman year significant other for a long period of time, you’re just not. You’ll both grow and mature and realize you want different things and breakup and that’s ok. Don’t take your relationships too seriously and make them your whole life because you’ll regret it. Instead, your dating life should be more about having fun than something serious and long lasting. 
  • Make an effort to participate in school spirit activities. It doesn’t have to be all of them or even most but you should attend some events. Try to make it out to a football game, go to homecoming, and attend spirit rallies or assemblies. I get that some of you don’t like them because they’re loud and can be boring, and that’s fine, but spirit events are a great way to bond with your class and get a feel for what high school really is. They make great memories and it would be awful to look back on high school senior year and realize you’ve never been to one school activity.
  • Mental health is super important. Please don’t ignore it because it affects every facet of your life. Talk to someone if you’re depressed, anxious, stressed, overworked etc. Get the help you need. Don’t hide your problems and think they’ll go away because they most likely won’t and you’ll suffer in your academics, social life, and overall health. You’ll naturally feel different all year because high school is a big transition and you’re getting used to everything but make an effort to reach out to friends, teachers, counselors, and parents to talk about how you’re feeling.

That turned out kind of long but I hope it was helpful. Let me know if you have any questions and good luck next year! 

2

she’s a handsome woman // panic! at the disco

How to Study for AP Physics

I’ve gotten quite a few questions on how I “self-studied” for AP Physics, so I decided to make one cohesive post talking about what methods I used. I answered the question earlier in an ask (here), but it was pretty disorganized, so I tried to structure it better here! Sorry it’s still pretty long though :c

– MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCE

  • The reason that I said I “self-studied” physics was because my teacher didn’t really teach during the school year. Additionally, there’s honestly way too much to cover in the book for my teacher to go through all of it, so I don’t really blame him all that much. It’s up to you to take the initiative to go through the book and really learn the material that wasn’t covered during class.
  • LUCKILY, our tests were really difficult, so I think I was very well prepared for the actual AP exam! :’)
  • I found my study methods during second semester (rip me) (oh first semester sighs), so hopefully some of these tips can help you early on!

– STAY CAUGHT UP

  • For Physics, it is essential to stay caught up throughout the year. A lot of the concepts are cumulative and have to do with each other. Chances are, you’ll see concepts you learned from first semester appearing towards the end of second semester.
  • Although other topics (such as electricity/magnetism) don’t seem like they have anything to do with mechanics (ie. friction, kinematics), it’s actually very beneficial if you fully understood the earlier concepts. Being able to make connections between various concepts not only helps with remembering, but it also greatly improves your understanding!
  • Also, by the time midterms/finals come around, you’ll find that it’s extremely beneficial to have had fully understood the concepts the first time around. Instead of re-studying the information you crammed into your head the first time around, all you have to do now is just do some review and hopefully you’ll be good to go! 
  • Also, if you don’t understand something, ask. If your teacher isn’t capable of answering, try seeing of any of your classmates understand! If not, you can always turn to tumblr :’) If I’m capable, I’ll try to answer too HAHA

– PREVIEWING

  • I found that previewing the lessons were really helpful, because as my teacher went over the bare minimums/basics during class (with no explanations offered - just typically formulas that we needed to know etc), I was able to understand the lesson better. I knew the reason why certain things were, and I even knew most of the formulas ahead of time! This created less stress/pressure for me, because I didn’t feel completely lost during class as I did in the beginning oops haha

– THE IMPORTANCE OF CONCEPTS

  • Tbh I chose AP Physics as my science course because I’m more confident with math than straight memorization, and I heard that Physics involved a lot of math. And it is true! However, if you’re only taking AP Physics ½, it’s algebra-based. Which means that it’s not hard math - you just have to know how to apply it.
  • And that’s where concepts come in. Silly me first semester, I just did the math-based practice problems and did well on all the chapter tests (which were all FRQ-style). But when it came to midterms/finals, I pretty much bombed the multiple choice because my concept wasn’t up to par.
  • Take the time and READ YOUR BOOK. Read through the paragraphs (there aren’t that many thANK) of explanations and examples that are provided, and make sure you really truly understand what’s going on. 
  • Knowing how to merely solve the FRQ problems will be useless in the long run if you don’t know the concepts/reasoning behind them - especially because Collegeboard has revamped the FRQs to be more conceptual this year!!

– FIND YOUR STUDY METHOD

Everyone studies differently, and everyone has a different technique that will work best for them. Experiment with different methods and see what works for you - but I’ll list what I did below if anyone wants to try what I did!

TAKING NOTES FROM THE TEXTBOOK

  • As I said earlier, I thought I could skate past first semester with the little information my teacher provided during class and a grasp on the math in physics. HOWEVER, I realized that that was far from the truth. What helped me was going through the book and taking close notes.
  • Taking close notes isn’t that difficult with Physics, because it’s honestly more examples/math than pure text with explanations. BUT, because it’s like that, most of the information provided ends up being very crucial, so pay close attention.
  • My notes focused on concepts (and the reason behind them), and the occasional formula/equation (and the reasoning/proof as well).

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

  • This step is important because oftentimes gaps in understanding will be filled by reading about it through various other sources. Each book will have their own way of explaining it, and some may even have additional information that will help with better understanding!
  • I had a copy of the former AP Physics textbook at home, as well as two other “textbooks.” I also used my Barron’s AP book from time to time to practice problems!
  • Also I used khanacademy on youtube (LIFESAVER) to help with concepts when I didn’t understand something. They also have some problem examples that they work out for you - so that’s pretty useful as well!

– MEMORIZING EQUATIONS

  • AP Physics is now allowed an equation sheet on the AP exam. HOWEVER, I suggest that you memorize all the equations anyways. As long as you do enough practice problems, the formulas will end up being burned in your head anyways LOL. Tbh, during the AP exam, it’s pretty inconvenient to keep flipping to the equation sheet. I’m pretty sure it’s found at the very front of your test booklet, and you can’t rip it out or anything. Fortunately I don’t think I really used it, so I think I saved some time flipping back and forth~
  • Also if you want to take the SAT II subject test, they don’t provide an equation sheet, so gotta be prepared for that too!

– PRACTICE PROBLEMS

  • Again, I personally think Physics is one of the more math-heavy lab sciences out there. So while I really emphasize the importance of understanding and getting the concepts behind everything, you cannot slack on the math either!
  • Also, some concepts can be remembered/deduced through the equations/formulas, which i love :’) 
  • The way my book was structured, was that the practice problems were structured by level of difficulty. You probably won’t be assigned most of the problems for homework, so it is up to you to practice them yourself. Keep practicing them until you can get through them easily and things start making more sense to you. 
  • Speed is very important, because it’s not just understanding, but it’s being fluent and being able to get to the answer in a quick, efficient manner. This matters when you take tests/quizzes~
  • At the end of each chapter in my book, there were “general” problems - basically problems that require you to combine multiple concepts that you’ve learned so far. these are really good practice for several reasons:
  1. They prepare you for midterms/finals/the AP exam where they won’t tell you what type of problem you’re facing - you’re just going to have to figure out which concepts/equations are needed for each problem
  2. It helps you see problems in different angles // ie. problems you thought could only be solved in one manner, can actually be solved by using different concepts that you learned before! this can help you become more efficient too woopwoop
  3. They’re typically not easy problems, so if you can do these with not too much of a struggle, then you’re pretty much set :’) although tbh if you can’t do some of them, don’t panic/stress either, because some of them will most likely be harder than the types of problems that your teacher chooses to use on his/her exam.

– LABS I FORGOT TO ADD THIS EARLIER I’M SORRY

  • UNDERSTAND YOUR LABS. ACTUALLY DO YOUR LABS. BE HANDS ON. PREVIEW THEM VERY WELL BEFORE YOU WALK INTO THE CLASSROOM. do not be a potato sack and watch your labmates do your lab for you, because it will help with understanding if you actively participate and make connections during the process
  • and also as i mentioned earlier the new ap exam is much more focused on concepts so knowing how to perform certain experiments will help you in the long run ^-^

Annnnd I think that’s all! If there’s anything else I remember, I’ll make sure to update this post. I know pretty much all of this sounds basic, but it’s what worked for me~ it’s honestly just a lot of hard work and diligence. Physics is not an overnight/cramming kind of class, and I really advise to be on top of things and to not leave studying until the last minute. Try to understand things while you go through the lessons, and GOOD LUCK. I BELIEVE IN YOU. it’s tough work but hey man hey it’ll be okay ^-^ do not be too disheartened either if you don’t get into the swing of things right away~ as long as you can say you gave it your all without any regrets I’d say that’s pretty gr8 already uwu

I have this theory...

…that Disneyland (or any theme park really) would be a great place for studying for midterms/finals/in between semesters/etc.

Before you go there with your study group, download a flash cards app to your phone. Then create cards with your study material. Also, obtain a portable cell phone charger (or two).

Before entering the park, pick someone to go first. Maybe the person who drove (the most) to get there. Or the person with the highest grade in the class. Or draw straws.

While waiting in line to get inside the park, that person asks study questions for everyone else to answer. Vote whether to do it turn based or free-for-all-to-answer. The person with the most correct answers before the group reaches the front of the line wins and chooses which attraction to go to and becomes the questioner as you wait in line for that attraction.

Rinse and repeat.

Alternatively, you could find and download a Heads Up! copycat app that lets you create custom decks and then play the app with your study material.

Lastly, create/edit rules as you or the group sees fit. For example, if the same two people are always winning, they could take a break for 2-3 rounds.