quick tip

Plant Care 101: The Basics

It’s kind of hard to give a super basic guide to plant care because plants are super diverse and have varying care requirements BUT there are some things that every plant needs and that you can apply pretty broadly to caring for plants. This is going to be focused on container plants and houseplants more than plants in the ground/garden because that’s a whole other can of worms, but yeah, anyway, here’s some quick tips for beginner plant ownership.

1. LIGHTING - Think about where you’re actually going to put your plants

… before you get them (ideally). All plants need light. No plant will live in a windowless bathroom or basement (I mean unless you have grow lights BUT that’s another story). Very few plants will survive in a dark, dim corner.

Figure out which direction your house faces! Different plants do best in different light exposures.  Afternoon sun (west) is hotter than morning sun (east) and can dehydrate plants faster or cause sunburn. Southern exposures get the most direct sun, and northern exposures get mostly indirect sun or no sun. And obstacles like trees or awnings will potentially block light as well.

Full sun is considered 6+ hours of direct sun, part sun is 2-4 hours of direct sun, and shade is less than two hours of direct sun. Keep in mind the sun intensity will vary depending on your location and the time of year.

A lot of houseplants prefer “bright, indirect light”. In a window that gets hot, direct sunlight like a south or west window, this could mean putting up a sheer curtain or keeping the plants farther away from the window. East windows generally get bright indirect light all year and north windows may not be bright enough for most except the lowest light plants.

Get plants to suit your space! Do some research! If you have trouble identifying the plants that you already have, try google image searching using various details about it. Sometimes that works.

2. POTS AND SOIL - Think about your plant’s house

Your plant’s house is its pot. When you bring it home from the store or nursery, it’s a good idea to replant it. The soil that’s best for keeping the plant alive in the store is usually different than the soil that’s best for it in your house. Especially if you’re getting your plants from stores like Home Depot, Lowes, Wal-mart, etc (it’s gross). Taking a look at a plant’s roots is important! A lot can hide under the surface of the soil…

I can’t really recommend a specific soil brand because everything varies regionally and every plant is going to have different soil needs, so really this is just trial and error. Try out different soils! Experiment with perlite which will make your soil looser and drain better. For succulents, I use a mix of topsoil (not potting soil), sand, and perlite.

You generally want your generic potting soil to A) absorb some moisture but B) drain well. Which may seem contradictory, but it isn’t, I promise.

As for your pot….. DRAINAGE HOLES ARE A MUST. If your pot doesn’t drain, you can put your plant in a plastic insert and remove that to water it, you can attempt to add your own drainage holes, or you can doom your plant to slow and inevitable death. If your pot does have drainage holes, test it first to see if it actually drains.

Increase the size of your plant’s pot only a few inches at a time. Tiny plants in giant pots aren’t ideal, mainly because the soil dries down inconsistently. The soil around the edges may be dry but soil at the roots may still be wet. Also, don’t plant your plants too low! The soil should stop about an inch or so below the top of the pot. Planting too low can cause issues with air circulation to the stem/soil which can cause rot issues. (tbh I’ll probably make a specific post about repotting plants because there are a lot of things to know and a lot of tips and tricks)

As for the type of pot, that’s up to you. Plain terracotta pots are helpful for plants that like to dry down between waterings because they wick moisture from the soil…  not as ideal for plants that love lots of water. Also, there’s no shame in plain, plastic pots. None.

3. WATERING - please don’t drown your thirsty boys

This one’s the hardest to do an overview of because different plants and even the same plants in different locations have vastly different watering needs.

Plants (usually) only take up water when the photosynthesize. Less light = less photosynthesizing = less water taken up. Cloudy day? Less water taken up. In the greenhouse, we generally don’t water on cloudy days because the plants don’t take up as much water and because water sitting on the leaves/soil doesn’t evaporate as quickly potentially leading to rot issues.

You can usually visually tell if the soil is dry. To be more sure that the soil is really dry, poke your finger in about an inch. To be more, more sure, you can wiggle a wooden chopstick in the soil and if it comes out dry, the soil is dry. Some plants prefer to dry down almost completely before watering again, some prefer about 30-50%, some like to stay moist but not drowning.



If your plant appears to be wilting, check the soil. If it’s wet, it may be overwatered or sick. Don’t water for a bit and check the stem/roots for rot. If it’s dry, it’s likely underwatered. Very dry soil can take a few repeat waterings to actually absorb moisture again.



It is better to water deeply infrequently than to water in small amounts more frequently. Your goal when watering is to dump in enough water that it flows vigorously out of the drainage holes. When I first started watering plants I thought it was way too much but seriously, dump that water in there. No trickles allowed.



4. PLANT ISSUES - wtf is wrong with my plant

You’re going to run into plant issues when keeping plants, that’s just how it is. Diseases, bugs, rot, etc.

There are WAY too many issues to get into in a basic post like this, but in general…. pay attention to your plant! Look at the undersides of the leaves and leaf tips and the stem. Take lots of pictures! Touch your plant and the soil! Keep an eye out for changes.

If your plant does develop what you think is an issue, google is your friend. I’ve googled so much of the stuff I know about plants, even when I’m working with very experienced growers. Google is good. Don’t rely solely on one source of info.

And if your plant unfortunately kicks the bucket? No, you don’t have a black thumb. There is no such thing. That’s especially a time to google the shit out of that plant and re-evaluate your growing conditions. I’ve killed LOADS of plants and that was usually because I put a plant in a less than ideal location and then didn’t give it the right care. Or because of bad luck.

There is NO SUCH THING as a black thumb.

I think that’s about it really for the basics. There’s also stuff like pH and humidity and temperature, etc etc to consider but that’s way too much to get into in just one post. Hopefully this makes some kind of sense and isn’t just a wall of text? And is helpful? If you have any other questions, feel free to message me if you’d like. Or add onto this post with other tips if you have them.

『10.21.17』
Ahh finally the rigorous week ended, so I got more time to post more pictures~ How have you guys been? I hope you’re doing well!
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「Quick tip: Know what type of schedule best works for you, whether it be time tables or weekly calendars. This will help you manage your time correctly! 」

Quick Tips #1: Helping an Age Regressor to Regress


1) Bring up the things that excite them!

👉Examples: Ask about how they do things, hobbies, music, etc… Act interested!



2) Comfort them!

👉Examples: “It’s okay to regress/be little around me,” “I think it just makes you cuter,” and more!



3) Baby talk! Treat them like the age/age range they regress to.



4) Take initiative!

👉Examples: “Why don’t you get your (paci/binkie, stuffie [bonus points if you know their name], blankie, sippy, juice, coloring book)?”



5) Be kind and supportive of their behavior when they regress, but correct it as needed.

👉Example: Coloring == Good! Coloring on walls == Bad

DLC Gladio is near and I didn’t feel like drawing something bad-ass to commemorate the occasion also cuz I’m really busy with school right now. So have Gladio and Cor in the beach xD 

I’ve just got this BNHA idea that after they graduate they all get into the hero business; Iida does his brother’s name proud: Bakugou actually calms down a little: Shouto is able to prove he’s so much more than his father’s son.

Meanwhile Deku is well on the way to becoming the next top hero and the new Symbol of Peace ( the public is relieved: the criminals are shitting themselves, especially after Deku “accidentally” reveals in an interview that he’s reached about 50% so far ).

But one day, Deku’s facing a villain with a tricky quirk- maybe they’ve taken hostages, maybe they can absorb the power of his attacks. Anyway, Deku’s desperately trying to think of a way to beat this guy, when-

-a ball of paper hits the villain in the head. Everybody, Deku, the villain, the bystanders, see this guy jump the blockade and yell “Hey, asshole!” 

The villain snarls, and roars back “You little-” and stops with a very familiar blank look on their face. Deku starts grinning as the newcomer pulls off a false nose and takes off a wig, then opens his jacket to reveal a hero costume.

And the public lose their collective shit at the realisation that they’re seeing the Hero with a Thousand Faces, who goes undercover and uses his brainwashing quirk to take down the villains from within. And as he tells the villain “Sleep”, the crowd goes wild for the sight of Shinso Hitoshi, the hero called The Word.

(Shinso gets on great with Deku: he jokes it’s like pairing a sledgehammer and a scalpel. Deku’s one of the few people who never hesitates to answer Shinso- when he asked, Deku just grinned and said “Well, I know I can trust a fellow hero!”)

6

Obviously, I’m not the best with drawing hands. But that basic shape helped me with drawing hands best. (Circle works for me too but not as good as that ‘fan shape’ my professor taught our class).

Don’t forget to keep practicing and using real life references–It’s the best way to draw good hands! Take your time drawing them! Don’t rush (unless you really wanna) It’s not a competition.

Got questions? Feel free to ask!

Every year when January rolls around I have the urge to simplify – to start the new year fresh and clean and uncluttered. This doesn’t mean getting rid of everything (I’m faaaar from being a minimalist), just getting rid of the things that weigh you down. So, here’s the unofficial guide to simplifying without going full-on Marie Kondo. 

physical clutter

What’s the area in your room that stresses you out when you see it? Start there. A few quick tips on how to clean specific areas:

closet

  • Take allll your clothes out of your closet, wardrobe, or dresser
  • Put the things you know you’re keeping back in right away – your favorite jeans, that black dress you wear all the time, etc
  • Once you’re left with just the ‘maybes’, try every item on.
  • If you wouldn’t buy it all over again, it should probably go.
  • Don’t just toss what you don’t want, though! Donate it to a local thrift store, charity, or church with a community closet.

desk + shelves

  • Again, start by completely clearing off your desk and study area.
  • Go through your binders and make sure everything is in it’s correct place
  • Migrate materials from old classes into files out of the way if they’re important, or toss them if you won’t use them again.
  •  Make sure everything has a home – pencils should be in a bag or mug, papers in files or trays, and notebooks neatly stacked.
  • Make a point to clean your desk regularly!
  • If you have supplies you don’t need, donate them! Let’s be real – you have way more pens than you could ever use.
  • Books are also a wonderful thing to donate! Your local library or thrift shop would be my top pick. 
  • If you still have old textbooks laying around, list them on your school’s bulletin board to sell, since most thrift shops won’t accept them. 

under your bed

  • Let’s be real: most all of this can go. Grab a trash bag and toss anything that’s not important.
  • You can get one of those rolling tupperware under-the-bed organizers, or just stick what has to stay under there in a thin  cardboard box.
  • Be sure not to leave things loose under there, or you may end up with some unwanted pals living under there ~

digital clutter

I don’t know about you, but I feel like I have a lot of digital clutter. It’s so easy to build it up and forget about all that you have stored on your computer!

  • Go through your phone and delete photos you don’t need, apps you don’t use, and old messages. 
  • Do a major computer overhaul! Delete old files and programs so that you have more space.
  • Put all your files into folders so that they’re easier to find later on.
  • Take a look through your friends and following lists, and delete all those people that post negative things.

mental clutter

This is the big one. Mental clutter comes from all of the above, plus just living your life. Some tips for decluttering your mind:

  • Do a nightly brain dump. Before you get into bed each night, open up your journal and write down everything that’s on your mind. Once it’s on paper, you can let it go until the morning. 
  • Find relaxing habits to practice everyday: yoga, taking a warm bath, going for a run, etc
  • Practice mindfulness or meditation
  • Keep a planner!
  • Practice not letting yourself harbor bad thoughts
  • Stay away from negative people if you can. You don’t need negative attitudes to be adding your already stressful life!

simplify your schedule

  • Learn to say ‘no’ more – if you don’t want to go to your friend’s-cousin’s-niece’s dance recital, don’t.
  • Streamline your daily routine;
    • Get ready faster by nixing the makeup you don’t love to put on and finding quick and easy hairstyles
    • Make an outfit idea board on Pinterest and fill it with outfits that you can make from pieces you already have in your closet so you spend less time finding an outfit 
    • Cook meals in advance when possible, or stick an easy meal in the crockpot before you leave for the day
    • Tidy every room just a bit before you leave it, so that you don’t have to devote an hour to cleaning it later on
  • Make time for you each week
  • See if there are any chores that you can outsource (eg, some grocery stores will shop for you for free, all you have to do is order online and go pick it up)
  • Don’t feel like you have to participate in something you don’t enjoy. If you don’t love the sport, don’t play it

I hope you all have a very simple and relaxing year, good luck to you all!

Some quick Tabletop Roleplayng tips for newbies

With the popularity podcasts like TAZ or Critical Role have gained I’ve been seeing many people start getting into tabletop roleplaying which is so nice and fills me with hope since I’ve gotten used to be the youngest in groups at 23. 

So here’s some tips for people who are interested in getting into tabletop roleplaying: 

  • Your first session is not going to be what you expect. Unless you and your peers have a theatre kids background, you’re probably going to be shy and it’s going to be awkward. It’s normal. You’re not an actor or a professional entertainer. You’re having fun sharing a story with your friends, not recording a podcast for a living. 
  • Long campaigns are good but it’s usually difficult for adults to commit to one and it’s sad when they get abandoned. Give one-shots and short campaigns a chance! They are honestly really fun for a night with friends and don’t usually require hours of building a character.
  • Speaking of characters, my recommendation is to start with a character whose personality and beliefs resemble yours. Choosing to play a charming and outspoken character who loves public speeches can put a lot of pressure on you if you’re shy. 
  • If you go to a LARP do a bit of research on who is organizing and who is attending, if you don’t know them make sure it’s in a public place. If there’s softcombat let the GMs know if you’re allergic to latex and if you have any lesion they should be aware of. 
  • D&D and high fantasy are not the end-al be-all of tabletop roleplaying (in all honesty I find it kinda boring?), give other universes/systems/lore a chance, you might find something that suits your interests more than D&D. 
  • Don’t stress over rules. Also, a good GM should not make you stress over rules. 
  • Villain campaigns might sound cool, but I wouldn’t recommend them if this is your first campaign. ESPECIALLY if you don’t know the people you are playing with. 
  • A good GM should not make fun of your triggers and will work around them . 
  • Trust your gut. You are here to have fun, if you are feeling uncomfortable it’s time to get up and leave. 
The quickest show not tell tip ever.

‘Always show, not tell,’ is a big fat lie. If you always show, you’ll have half a novel of descriptive words and flowy sentences that will be hard to read.

Here is a quick tip:

Show emotion.

Tell feelings.


Don’t tell us 'she was sad.’ Show us- 'Her lip trembled, and her eyes burned as she tried to keep her tears at bay.’

Don’t show us 'her eyelids were heavy- too heavy. Her limbs could barely function and she couldn’t stop yawning.’ Tell us - 'she felt tired that morning.’

Showing emotion will bring the reader closer to the characters, to understand their reactions better. But I don’t need to read about how slow she was moving due to tiredness.

Likewise, when you do show, keep it to a max three sentences. Two paragraphs of 'how she was sad,’ with no dialogue or inner thought is just as boring.

How to Return to your Manuscript

Every writer knows what it’s like to set a manuscript down for an evening and just… not pick it up again.

Usually when this happens, we have every intention of returning to it the next day, but for some reason or another, we don’t. 

One day turns into a week. Which turns into a month. Maybe two. 

The longer the manuscript’s been set aside, the harder it becomes to pick up again. It turns into this dark, hulking presence lurking at the edge of your consciousness, like something in a horror movie, eating away at that piece of your identity labeled “writer.” 

The reasons for not picking it up may change, but there’s always one.

You may not know where to start again, or doubt that your abilities are up to the standard its plot or characters require. You may not know where to find the time to write anymore. You may have even sat down to write just a few minutes ago, and ended up here on Tumblr instead, unable to bring yourself to open the manuscript file. 

If you’re reading this post and feel personally attacked…

Don’t fret. 

I have a writing exercise for you. 

Set aside ten minutes of your day to look at your manuscript. 

  • I recommend reading the last scene you completed, but this is your manuscript and your time. You can look at the first page. Or that one scene in the middle that you actually kind of like. Just don’t look at a blank page. Blank pages are scary and this is all about eliminating writing anxiety. 
  • Personally, I make this the last thing I do in the day, so I go to sleep with my manuscript in my head. Sometimes it helps to let my unconscious mind have a go at sorting through what I’ve read. However, I think it’s helpful to do this before any long period of time when you can let your mind wander. You may find writing more helpful before work/school or during lunch. Before a commute. Whatever works best for you. 

But don’t write and don’t look for more than ten minutes. 

  • You’re not allowed to change a single thing in the document. Not a comma. Not a misspelled word. 
  • When the ten minutes are up, simply close the document and go on with your day/night. 
  • There will probably be some things that you do want to change in the manuscript. They may be very simple, sentence-level fixes, but they may be as big as an idea for continuing the scene or the start of the next chapter. Let those thoughts sit with you, instead of all of the manuscript doubt and anxiety that were sitting with you before.
  • And yes, keeping your time down to ten minutes is important. You want a focus on a bite-sized portion of the manuscript. If you read too much, you’ll give yourself too much to consider for the next day, you’ll find too much to change, and you’ll run the risk of making your work as anxiety-inducing as ever. 

The next day, sit down with your document for another ten minutes. 

  • Allow yourself to make the changes you didn’t make the first day, or ones you’ve come up with since. This may mean adding a few commas and removing a few ‘that’s. This may mean continuing with the scene. Ten minutes is the perfect amount of time to set down a good paragraph. Try that. 
  • Again, force yourself to stop after ten minutes, even if you’re on a roll now. The stopping means that you have to keep all of those changes that you’re excited to make inside your head. It means that your thoughts about your manuscript are good and productive. It’ll keep you looking forward to your next writing session. Key advice: at the end of every writing session, always leave an edit in your head. It’ll be that small, tangible thing you can start with in your next session. 

Rinse, repeat, and develop a routine. 

  • Sit down for at least ten minutes every day. Make it a routine. Once the manuscript is open, do whatever feels comfortable to you: whether that means reading a chapter, editing something old, or writing something new. 
  • If you’re coming up with edits and scenes that simply require more than ten minutes, start amping up your writing time. Write for an hour. Write for two or three. 
  • Have a super busy day and know you can’t write for an hour? Those ten minutes are still fine. They’re still enough. Never feel like having spent three hours writing yesterday means you have to spend three hours writing today. Never feel like a failure for not spending X hours a day writing. That will only lead to not writing at all. 
  • What if you get stuck again? Go back to a shorter writing time, go back to reading and not writing. Reduce the pressure you’ve put on yourself and relax your expectations. The most important thing is simply returning to your manuscript every day whether you have something good to set on the page or not. 
  • Never got un-stuck in the first place? That’s still okay! Keep spending your ten minutes with your manuscript. Write or just read. Keep it in your thoughts. Make it a defined, real, thing instead of that monster lurking in your head. It may take time, but eventually, something will click, and by that point, opening that file and getting started will be a piece of cake.
  • If you are able to write for an hour or two each day, you may find it useful to continue setting aside ten minutes each evening to read that day’s work–read but not edit–and keep a few edits in your head for the next day’s session. 

By the end of a week, whether you’ve written a hundred new pages or fixed a lot of bad grammar, you’ll at least be in a place where you’re once again thinking about your manuscript in tangible terms, as a thing made up of words and paragraphs instead of anxiety and blank pages. 

Maybe in the end, you’ll decide that you simply need to abandon this story and pick up a new one. If this happens, you’ll be in a great place to start, with a writing routine already in place. 

More likely than not, just spending time with your story will fan up your love for it again. And once more, your manuscript will be the annoying, stubborn, untameable child you adore instead of a lurking horror. 

For more advice on working through writer’s block, check out another post of mine: What to Do When You Can’t Write

Originally posted by gypsyastronaut

These are just some modern,kinda weird ways to do quick witchcraft and keep it hidden.

-enchant bandaids with positive energies(protection,confidence,peace) and keep them on you if you’re feeling sad,angry,etc. Visualize your emotions as a cut somewhere and put the bandaid over it to try and heal it.

-make your entire room your altar. you don’t have to have one specific place for tools if it’ll look suspicious.

-use hygiene magic such as different hairstyles,bath products,colored hair ties,scented perfumes,flavored toothpaste

-if you’re an artist,clean your brushes on your by painting sigils on your skin when you’re painting

-if your phone is being watched,or your parents are really strict/Christians,use👏your👏school👏library👏check out books on astrology,history of witchcraft,divination,dreams. Also use the computers to search up spells and copy them onto paper/your BoS

-keep tarot cards under your pillow or in the case. this is not only a good hiding spot but good bonding with them. they can also be moonlight charged if your bed is by a window.

-your BoS can be notes scribbled in a regular book,whether on small pieces of different paper or blank space. Careful not to lose the pieces or let anyone else read it!

-create bookmarks of correspondences or whatever you want to memorize and put them in the book you’re reading

-regularly go for walks. unless your parents/people you’re living with are super strict,this is an easy way to bond with nature. bring your pets along for the journey too! talk to the animals,plants and sun/moon/stars. they love you💞

-create a playlist for a spell and as you’re listening,dance or hum along to charge it.

-paint your nails with your intent! green= money,red= courage and so forth

-if your pet is your familiar,play with them and get to know them more

-if asked about sigils ,say it’s for a writing project and they’re a made up language.

Feel free to add on more!

school starts for me in a little over a week so i thought i’d make a quick back to school masterpost! this is a compilation of tips that i found helpful from youtube study channels, as well as things that i’ve personally done to make school easier. 

  • do your best work as soon as school starts
    • usually the first week(s) of school have a relatively light homework load, but don’t slack off!
    • this is the time to put in the most effort
    • you’ll be able to see which subjects you want to spend more or less time on throughout the semester
    • also, if you turn in great work, participate in class, and go to office hours right from the start, you’re going to keep up those good habits as the school year continues
    • plus, you’ll leave a fantastic impression on your teachers :)
  • use! a! planner!
    • cliché? yes, but it works
    • planners are a great tool to organize so many different aspects of your life, not just school
    • write down your assignments as soon as you get them so that you won’t forget anything, and so that you can plan your day/week accordingly
    • try to space out your assignments if you can so that you don’t spend all of your time on just one subject
    • describe your tasks. instead of saying “study chemistry” (which will turn into binge-watching youtube), say “practice balancing chemical equations”
    • planners are also great for setting and keeping track of goals! 
    • BUT, if planners don’t work for you, use some other way to keep track of your tasks and your time - to do lists, schedules, checklists, bullet journals, etc. choose what works for you!
    • just make sure that you keep all of your tasks in one place. 
  • break down larger tasks, such as projects or papers, throughout the week
    • do a little every day instead of cramming all the work into one night
    • bonus: try to get your assignments reviewed by someone like a teacher or a classmate before turning them in - most teachers are happy to look at drafts and give suggestions that will improve your work and your grade!
    • also, for big projects, my procrastinating brain has found it helpful to ‘reset the deadlines’ - work so that you’ll finish your bigger assignments a few days before they’re actually due
  • a big part of breaking down tasks and planning is also knowing your own study habits
    • try to figure out how long you spend on certain types of assignments, and know how much time you should allocate to specific tasks
  • when you have a choice, go for meaningful
    • for some assignments, such as essays where you can choose your own prompt, it’s easy to choose the easy prompt
    • but whenever you can, try to go for the prompt that will help you to deepen your understanding of the material you’ve learned
    • teachers who reuse prompts will probably see a lot of the “same” essays every year, so this is a way to stand out in a positive way!
  • if you can, declutter
    • or at least try to clean up your study space for the school year
    • having a neat space to work can really go a long way
    • throw out those old pens that have run out of ink and are honestly just there to look pretty
    • also: invest in good lighting because you gotta take care of those beautiful eyes
  • find classmates who can be your study buddies
    • if you know who the “top students” in your class are, seek out their help! get contact info!
    • if you miss classes or have concepts that you’re having trouble with, you’ll always have someone to ask
    • i mean you should always feel comfortable with asking your teacher for help, but it’s nice to have someone to quickly proofread your paper or review for a test with
    • peer tutors are also a great resource!
  • take the time to establish new habits
    • maybe come up with a morning/afternoon/night routine so that you know you’ll spend some time every day being productive
    • and don’t let yourself off the hook here!!
    • some ideas for habits: hydrating properly every day, working out, getting enough sleep every night, avoiding procrastination, journaling, focusing on one thing at a time / not multitasking, going to office hours consistently, participating in class
    • be honest with yourself. what are some things you do every day that you might not need to do every day? and what are some things you hope you can add to your daily routine?
  • speaking of habits, fix that sleep schedule asap
    • if you want to pay attention in class and turn in good work, you’re going to need enough sleep
    • i would recommend sleeping early and waking up early over sleeping late - it just feels less awful throughout the day and it shouldn’t do as much damage to your sleep schedule as one all nighter will
  • get yo priorities straight
    • learn to say “no” to things that will take up your time but won’t really benefit you
    • recognize that not everything is important
  • that being said! take breaks!!
    • burnout is real my friends
    • a lot of people say that you should use your downtime to work, and you definitely can if you want to and feel able to
    • it’s so easy to feel like you have to be studying or working 24/7, and that’s not true
    • if you feel like you really need a break, take a break
    • spend time with your family and friends! treat yourself with some ice cream! go for a walk (without your phone)! call someone who lives far away from you to say you miss them!
    • being productive is great, and even if you’re the kind of person that can handle that much work without burning out, that stress will release itself elsewhere - some harsh words you didn’t mean, some small thing that annoyed you more than it should have

ok that was a lot crammed into one post, but i have one more important point: be excited for school!!! it may be stressful at times (most of the time) but school is a place where we learn things and better ourselves and open our minds to new perspectives! i am personally so psyched for 10th grade and i think having that attitude will make back to school a lot easier :)

i hope some of these tips help you, and as usual feel free to drop me an ask about anything! i’ll be writing more of these “quick tip”-type masterposts for back to school because they’re a looot less time consuming for me to make (being honest here). let me know what you think of this format! and if you have any requests for masterpost topics i’m always open to those.