question of authority

zeto1304  asked:

I have a question for the author. Papyrus at the beginning of Ask remembered the genocidal route. In the case, Sans, Alphys The Undying and Napstabot NEO were killed (and Asgore also inside the ruins). In the end, Papyrus dies, Chara killed Toriel in a one hit and Temmie was stabbed to death ... Chara gave his soul to Frisk? Is it a soulless pacifist route? And the shadow behind Chara with the L.O.V.E in the 19 was our shadow (Of the player)?

((The shadow was indeed meant to represent the player. And as of this run the player no longer has any input. And as for the results for Underswap’s genocide, I’d like to think it plays differently than Undertale’s, if you have Chara and Frisk as different personalities when they died anyway. But I wouldn’t say they’re soulless right now.))

And if you questioned me as to
what kind of flower blooms inside
my chest, I’d ask you, “where do
you see a garden in me?” I am
made of seeds that never sprouted.
I am a drought that never stops
leeching. I bring the rainstorms that
drown my own saplings.

I grow nothing beautiful here.
I will only destroy it.

—  loaded question // Haley Hendrick
Character flaws

- Self-image: arrogant // having low self-esteem.
The subtleties: the character getting him/herself into trouble because (s)he thinks (s)he can do more than (s)he actually can // a lack of confidence, which can be annoying to other characters & can possibly be dangerous, if it surfaces at a crucial moment
The extremes: narcissism or a god complex // self-destruction (either conscious or unconscious)

- Temperament: uncontrollable // so controlled the character goes numb.
The subtleties: irritable temperament, which causes conflict between characters // indifference that can be hurtful to other characters, which also causes conflict
The extremes: verbal or physical violence (possibly homicide) // being cold, calculating and ruthless

- Opinions: strong // weak. (Although weak opinions or beliefs make for flawed characters, strong opinions on their own are not necessarily flaws – it depends on what the character believes so strongly, and if they believe so strongly they are no longer open-minded.)
The subtleties: making enemies who have different beliefs than you // being seen as kiss-ass or wishy-washy
The extremes: radicalism or zealotry // untrustworthiness

- Loyalty: loyal // disloyal. (Again, loyalty is not necessarily a flaw – as long as it’s in moderation.)
The subtleties: annoying heroics // hesitation to help the protagonist(s), which, if the character in questions holds important questions/materials, can be problematic
The extremes: zealotry or being foolishly loyal (unnecessarily leading self/others to danger or destruction due to loyalty – particularly pointless if it’s only to prove a point, rather than a practical reason) // untrustworthiness

Please, feel free to reblog with your thoughts/add-ons!

  • What she says: I'm fine
  • What she means: The Iron Giant is such a vastly overlooked cartoon classic which didn't get nearly enough recognition despite its originality and its approach to mature topics in a way that was accessible to a young audience. From the way Brad Bird handled the villain, a man driven mad by the paranoia inflicted on him by government propaganda, to his clear and unflinching anti-war message, The Iron Giant encouraged children to question authority and be suspicious of the media we are spoon fed, and I will always wonder whether there were more sinister forces at work which kept the film from reaching a wider audience. Also, I am so thirsty for Dean McCoppin, it is embarrassing.
50 Writing Prompts

1. Do you worry more about people judging your mind or body?
2. Does the power lay with the sword or the pen?
3. Describe a mouth without using any anatomical words (teeth, lips, tongue, etc.).
4. What have you accomplished this year?
5. Make a playlist of songs that remind you of one person, title it with their name.
6. What’s a broken heart?
7. Write a journal entry to someone who has come back into your life after hurting you.
8. Do you like the age you’re at?
9. Do last words hold a greatly significant meaning?
10. How does age affect/ limit you?
11. Do you think you’d better parent a girl or a boy?
12. What is the longest period of time you have had a crush on someone?
13. Do you believe in auras?
14. Is religion by nature repressive?
15. Do you need organized religion for spiritual enlightenment?
16. What’s the different between being religious and being spiritual?
17. Is there a special reason why your parents named you what they did?
18. Who demands the most perfection from you?
19. Would you rather be able to fly or teleport?
20. Is your heritage important to you?
21. What is one gift you would like that costs under ten dollars?
22. How many times a day do you lie?
23. Do you think someone’s piercings and hair color should affect their chances of being hired for a job?
24. What judgements do you make about people who have dyed hair and facial piercings?
25. Do you seek pain?
26. Describe your bed and sheets.
27. Are bigger houses better?
28. Make a playlist dedicated to a paternal figure in your life.
29. Do you think your horoscopes are accurate?
30. Talk about people in your life who you consider close but have the habit of sabotaging you.
31. Who is the most frustrating person in your life?
32. Do you pray?
33. Make a list of words that don’t sound appealing.
34. Describe a sound that bothers you? For example, the scratching of a chalkboard.
35. Do you consider your area to be affluent?
36. How has your home life affect your school life?
37. When’s the last time you were in nature?
38. Create a list of words to describe how you feel about the 2016 presidential election.
39. Write a haiku.
40. Will some people never be happy?
41. Is loneliness a mental state of mind or physical state of being?
42. What is one secret that you’re keeping for someone else?
43. What is one secret you are keeping for yourself?
44. Do you find keeping secrets to be easy?
45. Why is it hard to be honest?
46. Can you fall asleep in cars?
47. Is physical touch important to find comfort?
48. What did you do last Friday?
49. Is writing a cathartic process for you?
50. What is the last movie you cried watching?
-cjf

Journaling Tag!

Put a number in my ask box and I’ll answer that question!
1. Hardcover journal or softcover?
2. Leather or plastic?
3. Wide ruled, college ruled, graphed, or blank pages?
4. Preferred journal size?
5. Favorite brand?
6. Least favorite brand?
7. Spiral or bound?
8. Favorite journaling youtuber?
9. Best writing advice you’ve been given?
10. Cursive or print?
11. Digital journal or paper journal?
12. How long have you been journaling for?
13. How often do you journal?
14. What do you write in your journals?
15. Do you use your journal as a personal diary?
16. How many journals do you actively use?
17. Do you draw in your journals?
18. Favorite place to journal?
19. Do you hide your journals?
20. Are your journals full of happy things or sad things?
21. Leather or faux-leather?
22. What are your favorite page fillers?
23. How long does it usually take you to fill up a journal?
24. Do you name your journals?
25. Where do you buy most of your journals?
26. What are your hobbies besides journaling?
27. Where do you store your full journals?
28. Do you let anyone read your journals?
29. What do you want to happen with your journals when you die?
30. Will you ever quit journaling?
31. Ever tried fauxbonichi style?
32. Do you use a bullet journal?
33. Why do you journal?
34. Do you listen to music or the TV while journaling?
35. Do you journal in public places?
36. Do you go places with your journal?
37. What was the longest time it’s taken you to fill up a journal?
38. What was the shortest time it’s taken you to fill up a journal?
39. Preferred number of pages?
40. Do you write the time of day next to your entries?
41. What was your first journal?
42. Expensive or cheap journals?
43. Do you bookmark your pages?
44. Do you number your pages?
45. What is the best time of day to journal?
46. How many journals have you filled up so far?
47. Do you write in pen, pencil, or marker?
48. When putting things in it, do you prefer to use tape, a glue stick, or liquid glue?
49. Has anyone inspired you to start a journal? Who?
50. What do you start your entries with?
51. Do you journal at a table or in bed?
52. How long does it usually take for you to complete an entry?
53. Have you ever gotten anyone else to start journaling?
54. Have you ever used a homemade journal?
55. Do you prefer thick or thin pages?
56. Do you glue your pages together?
57. Since you’ve started journaling, what’s the longest you’ve gone without writing in it?
58. Include a picture of your favorite journal page.
59. Include a picture of any of your journals.
60. Any weird journaling habits?

Fanfic author ask meme

My first ask meme, and one that’s been on my mind for a while! Feel free to reblog for your it for yourself, answer them, or ask me for my answers! Read more break after 10/50 to help keep this from clogging any dashboards

1. What was your first fic and could you stand to reread it today?

2. What’s your most recent fic and how far do you think you’ve come?

3. In your opinion, what’s your best fic?

4. In your opinion and without looking at any numbers, what’s your most popular fic?

5. Is there any fic that makes you super happy to reread and remember you wrote that?

6. Is there any fic that makes you super embarrassed to reread and remember you wrote that?

7. What’s the fic you most want to continue (unfinished or no)?

8. What’s the oldest (longest since last update) fic you most want to continue (unfinished or no)?

9. Have you ever written for a fandom without watching/reading/playing the source material?

10. Have you ever written for a fandom without reading other fanfic for it?

Keep reading

the thing that annoys me most about snape is how great a friend to harry he could have been if he wasn’t a shitlord

like, having someone who questioned dumbledore’s authority and had intimate knowledge of how the death eaters work would have been really good for harry in book five? but nope, he just has to mess everything up

✍ Finally, an ask-meme for writers! ✍
  • 01: When did you first start writing?
  • 02: What was your favorite book growing up?
  • 03: Are you an avid reader?
  • 04: Have you ever thrown a book across the room?
  • 05: Did you take writing courses in school/college?
  • 06: Have you read any writing-advice books?
  • 07: Have you ever been part of a critique group?
  • 08: What’s the best piece of feedback you’ve ever gotten?
  • 09: What’s the worst piece of feedback you’ve ever gotten?
  • 10: What’s your biggest writer pet-peeve?
  • 11: What’s your favorite book cover?
  • 12: Who is your favorite author?
  • 13: What’s your favorite writing quote?
  • 14: What’s your favorite writing blog? c;
  • 15: What would you say has inspired you the most?
  • 16: How do you feel about movies based on books?
  • 17: Would you like your books to be turned into TV shows, movies, video games, or none?
  • 18: How do you feel about love triangles?
  • 19: Do you prefer writing on a computer or longhand?
  • 20: What’s your favorite writing program?
  • 21: Do you outline?
  • 22: Do you start with characters or plot?
  • 23: What’s your favorite & least favorite part of making characters?
  • 24: What’s your favorite & least favorite part of plotting?
  • 25: What advice would you give to young writers?
  • 26: Which do you enjoy reading the most: physical, ebook, or both?
  • 27: Which is your favorite genre to write?
  • 28: Which do you find hardest: the beginning, the middle, or the end?
  • 29: Which do you find easiest: writing or editing?
  • 30: Have you ever written fan-fiction?
  • 31: Have you ever been published?
  • 32: How do you feel about friends and close relatives reading your work?
  • 33: Are you interested in having your work published?
  • 34: Describe your writing space.
  • 35: What’s your favorite time of day for writing?
  • 36: Do you listen to music when you write?
  • 37: What’s your oldest WIP?
  • 38: What’s your current WIP?
  • 39: What’s the weirdest story idea you’ve ever had?
  • 40: Which is your favorite original character, and why?
  • 41: What do you do when characters don’t follow the outline?
  • 42: Do you enjoy making your characters suffer?
  • 43: Have you ever killed a main character?
  • 44: What’s the weirdest character concept you’ve ever come up with?
  • 45: What’s your favorite character name?
  • 46: Describe your perfect writing space.
  • 47: If you could steal one character from another author and make then yours, who would it be and why?
  • 48: If you could write the next book of any series, which one would it be, and what would you make the book about?
  • 49: If you could write a collaboration with another author, who would it be and what would you write about?
  • 50: If you could live in any fictional world, which would it be?

daniella501  asked:

Hi! I've been reading your blog and loving every single post. I'm a beginner at writing, and I was wondering: how could you write a realistic character?

Hi, thank you! I’m always glad to hear that this blog is helpful.

How to write realistic characters is always a common question among beginning writers, and I’d be happy to help you answer it. (Here’s my post on general character-building tips – it may help you.)

1. Give every character some sort of flaw.

Just as people aren’t perfect, neither are characters. It doesn’t have to be any huge problem – although it can be – but give each character something, whether it be stubbornness or a bad temper or being too giving. (My post on character flaws may give you some ideas.)

2. However, don’t make characters all good or all bad.

Give your protagonists bad traits and things they’re not good at, and give your antagonists talents and good traits. Chances are even the worst people think they’re doing right – just look at Hitler.

3. Don’t put your characters in boxes or give them limitations.

Just because your character is feminine doesn’t mean they can’t be an awesome streetfighter; just because your character plays varsity football doesn’t mean they can’t be intellectual and well-spoken. People are endless blends of traits, which is why they’re unique – so are characters.

Those are some blanket statements on creating characters – below I’ll link you to posts that may also help you!

Creating Likeable Characters

Building Friendships Between Characters

Writing Dialogue (the way a character speaks can tell a lot about them, which is why I’ve linked you to this post)

5 Ways To Develop A Convincing Character

Writing Dynamic Relationships

Character Mannerisms

Character Development

Writing Romantic Relationships

Also, @thecharactercomma specializes in characterization (and grammar), so that blog will probably be a huge help.

Hope this helps! If you have any more questions, feel free to ask! - @authors-haven

Sweet Dreams

Originally posted by frozen-delight

Pairing: Sam x Reader (kind of)
Warnings:  Fluff
Summary: Sam comes to sleep in the readers room


“This is your room” Sam smiles, opening the motel room with the key card.
“I get my own room?” you asked, setting your duffel bag down on the bed.
“Yeah, I figured you’d probably want a night or two away so I got you your own. Is that okay?” Sam looked very hesitant, scared he might have upset you in some way. His worry instantly washed away when he saw a smile spread across your lips.
“Yeah, no that’s great! I won’t have to deal with Dean’s snoring; who knows, I might even get a good nights sleep for once.“ you laughed, laying back on your queen sized bed.
“Well, here’s a copy of your room key in case you need it. We have yours too, so if something happens just call.” Sam chuckled, laying the room key on the table by the door.


The first night on the job wasn’t so bad. Dean had staked out one of the suspects houses while you and Sam questioned the local authorities and towns people about the murders.

“I am beat” you sighed, climbing out of the impala.
“Yeah, flirting with the Deputy can do that to ya” Sam joked with a hint of jealousy in his voice. There had been some sexual tension between the two of you lately, nothing had happened yet, but that didn’t mean you didn’t want it to.

Rolling your eyes, you watched as they crossed the other side of the motel and went into their room. Sighing you closed your door and immediately peeled off your clothes and jumped into the shower. When you had finished your nighttime routine, you turned on the tv to watch Friends and passed out within the episode.

The sound of your door shutting woke you up, immediately grabbing the gun from under your pillow you pointed it at the door.
“Sam?” you asked sleepily, setting the gun on your nightstand and sitting up with a yawn.
“Dean’s snoring is keeping me up, is it cool if I sleep in here?” he asked, you could hear how tired he was in his voice.
“Yeah, its okay.” you yawned, snuggling back down into your comforter. You watched as Sam grabbed a blanket and pillow from the closet and laid down on the couch, curling up so he would fit properly. A small smile played on your lips, “Sam, come get in the bed.” you laughed, pulling the other side of the blanket up.
“I’m fine here, y/n” Sam laughed, laying his head on the pillow.
“Sam, if you don’t get in the bed then you can’t sleep in here” you warned, a jokingly tone slipped out, making him laugh too.

Getting up, he crossed the room in just a few strides and got into your bed.
“Are you sure this is okay?” he asked, making sure he didn’t make you feel uncomfortable.
“I wouldn’t have offered if it wasn’t okay, Sammy” you mumbled, already falling back asleep. Hesitantly, Sam shifted his body so he was laying down under the covers, trying to make himself comfortable in the bed without disturbing you. There wasn’t a whole lot of room in the bed with the two of you.
“Sam” you whispered, feeling him shift in the bed.
“Yeah?” he replied, laying on his side facing your back.
“Come here” you whispered, grabbing his arm and pulling it over your body so you two were spooning. Sam moved closer to you, his front pressed right up against your back.
“Is this okay?” he asked, locking his arm around you so he could feel like he was protecting you from anything that might enter the room.
“mmmhmm” you mumbled again, slowly falling back into the sleep you had before he had come into your room.


The next morning, Dean entered your room, looking for Sam and was only a little bit shocked to find you two sleeping together in the same bed. Your bodies were pressed up against each other, your face was in Sam’s neck with his arms wound tightly around your body; almost as if he was trying to keep anyone from taking you from him.
Smiling softly, Dean pulled out his phone and took a few pictures of you two and laughed softly.
“Oh yeah, they are never going to live this down.”

I think I saw a post on this a while back, but all the teaching they do in schools on bullying is really not productive. It’s vague, unhelpful, feel good nonsense. If you really wanted to end bullying, you would talk about oppression, power structures and how to recognize them, ending anti-tattle-tale culture, and stop teaching the idea that fighting back is bullying too.

Of course, teaching that sort of thing encourages critical thinking and questioning of institution and authority, so I doubt they’ll change a thing. They’ll stick with the same “ignore it” and “tell a teacher” idiocy instead of proactive and pragmatic solutions that students can enact themselves and carry with them through life.

4

Koogi dominating four genres on the English Lezhin site. I’m shook. Learn where to read/how to get coins to read KS here.

credits to whoever made this. But I have a few things to add.
1) both have horrible lunches
2) we are in confinement
3) harsh and strict rules
4) if you leave without permission, you get in extreme trouble
5) you are LEGALLY FORCED TO BE THERE.
6) there’s bullying
7) it makes people go insane
8) it makes people cry
9) it makes people kill themselves
10) harassment (including sexual)
11)if you misbehave, you get solitary confinement, or confinement with a few other people.
12) authority has a lot of power and are extremely harsh
13) if you are good, you get to go out for a little while
14) people are not treated fairly
15) people are not treated equally, even by the authority

Sexism and elitism in the reptile industry.

WARNING: LONG TEXT POST

I know we have talked about this a number of times before, but I wanted to touch base on this again using my experience from last weekends expo now that I have some time to sit down and talk about it.

I had the privilege of taking with me my friend Scott, who knows little to nothing about reptiles, and my friend Rie who is a bird person. The expo actually went swimmingly for the most part, until I stopped at the booth belonging to Vince Russo. He may be more recognizable to people as the author of The Complete Boa. From what I have heard, a lot of people have had some very enjoyable experiences with this guy– healthy animals delivered to them, comprehensive answers given when asked questions, etc. My personal experience with him really wasn’t as nice, but it wasn’t inherently terrible, and I’ll get into that in a moment.

I had been eyeballing his table for a while because I was tentatively considering picking something up and I had heard through the grapevine that he was starting to really actually get into Sumatran Short Tails and I wanted to take a peek at what he might have. What I noticed first was a pair of girls approaching him, one asking something about one of the boas, saying that it looked similar to another morph she had seen. He straightened up, and with the most condescending tone I had heard in a while, not only corrected her but proceeded to talk to her like she was a child.

Then I approached.

My friend Scott was closer to Vince and was asking questions and our friendly author of The Complete Boa spoke to him very enthusiastically. He answered all of his questions professionally and pleasantly. I was standing a few feet away with Rie because I spotted a pair of SSTPs. One muddy male with yellow casting and a female with several kinks in her lower spine. They are labeled “BLACK BLOODS.” I say to Rie, “this is actually something to pay attention to because it can confuse people. There’s no such thing as a black blood, they’re Sumatran short tails. Same as the term Borneo bloods, Python breitensteini is a different species than brongersmai.”

Vince Russo cuts in and very loudly states “Borneo is Python BREITENSTEINI.” To which I very curtly said, “Yeah, I’m aware, I just said that, but thanks.”

He proceeded to tell me about how I should buy his P. curtus, but to keep in mind that he is only selling lone males. “I’m not selling any lone females” he says as I look down at the female, who has kinks down 1/3 of her body and despite that is listed at the same price as the male. I politely told him that I wasn’t really sure if I wanted to buy anything at all and he cut me off and said even louder “you won’t find them anywhere else. I’m the only guy I know who breeds them. You need to get them while you can.”

Me, being the asshole that I am, told him that I can name ten off of the top of my head and he claimed he’s never heard of any of them, including Kara Norris which I find very hard to believe.

This really does not seem like that big of a deal and in reality it’s not– I had very pleasant conversations with Mike Schultz of Outback Reptiles and his girlfriend who was so, so happy to introduce people to blood pythons and discuss the difference in temperament from CH, WC and CBB offspring. I bring this up because I’m seeing a LOT of new younger women start to become interested in the hobby and micro-aggressive behavior like what Vincent Russo displayed is so prevalent in the community. Had I not known better, if I were more ignorant and not as immersed in the hobby, I might have listened to Russo and bought that cheap, low quality Sumatran short tail without looking into other options, etc.

I talk about this every single time I go to an expo because it’s so important for women, girls, and just generally people who are new to the hobby to be aware and take everything you hear with a grain of salt. Some people will flat out lie to you, others will belittle you. I have had the experience of a breeder blatantly disallowing me from holding a large constrictor because he didn’t think I could “handle it.” I’ve had vendors try to outright slander the name of other breeders in good standing with the community in an effort to complete a sale.

I watched one young man end up buying what was very obviously an unhealthy bearded dragon that was showing a number of MBD symptoms to be told that “that’s normal” and “sometimes they just look like that.”


Please, please, please be aware of what is going on around you. Do not tolerate being treated like a child by vendors if you have questions. I will be honest and say that most of my interactions with vendors at expos are great and I meet a lot of awesome people. But the people who AREN’T great, the people who will lie or bring unhealthy animals to expos or treat people with no respect are the people that we need to weed the hell out of the hobby.

End rant.

The Promised No-study SAT Tips

I saw that a lot of you wanted these~ Disclaimer: You still have to know English and the basics of math for these. This goes especially if you’re not a native speaker - your English needs to be at a pretty good level.

General:

  1. Read. A lot. Whenever you see a text that’s at least a paragraph or two long, take time to practice skimming. If you’re bored and have a little time, take something, for example a food wrapper, and try to find occurrences of a word (for example “Acid” for food) as quickly as possible. Hard mode: look for synonyms.
  2. Practice filling out the answer sheet. This is a massive time-sink for a lot of people, so you should practice to eliminate it. Print out an example answer sheet and try filling out the circles quickly and accurately without distracting yourself a lot. Hard mode:Try doing it while not focusing only on the circles - look away or start thinking about the next question.
  3. Check. A lot. The main goal of this strategy is to leave yourself enough time when you’ve filled out an answer for each question when you’re calm, know the questions and can focus on checking. Try and go through the questions, thinking, “This question tests this and that.” If you have the time, look at each answer and identify the error in it (harder for the math questions, but loads of fun if you can do it).
  4. Think in patterns: Whenever you’re stuck on an example question, don’t just check the answer. Try and understand how the person found it, if this question is similar to others you have seen. The SAT only uses a few different types of questions, there will rarely be something to surprise you if you know the common patterns.
  5. Rest: The SAT is a very demanding exam. Give your brain time to relax - my advice would be not to do anything mentally strenuous the day before the test. Also, something I found out from competitions - bring chocolate. The sugar in it helps your brain work better and shrug off tiredness and eating it will draw blood away from your brain, effectively hibernating it for the break to conserve energy. Also, it’s just a really tasty snack!

Writing:

  1. Use the right format for the essay. There are a lot of easy points for using the four/five paragraph system. Introduction, Reason 1, Reason 2, Conclusion. Begin each paragraph with a topic sentence and follow up with a story from your life or a book/movie to illustrate it. This way, even without using fancy vocab or grammar, you can get the points for structure and critical thought. Now just try not to make any obvious spelling mistakes and call it a day!
  2. Try to quickly find an argument for the essay. They don’t actually rate how intelligent your argument is. So, take a minute or two, breathe deeply, and no matter how stupid your idea is, write it out. (You might still want to take caution with sensitive topics, especially if you’re an international. A dumb mistake I made in my first sitting was bashing on American charity - that definitely did not endear me to the proctors.)
  3. Paragraphs: You have to have experience reading - look at how the topic never changes abruptly. Insert sentences that link what’s written before and after the gap. Final sentences of paragraphs shouldn’t raise more questions.
  4. Sentence questions: Skim through the questions. Try to answer most of them, the first thing that comes to mind, and fill out the answer sheet immediately. Chances are, if it sounds good to you, it’s the correct choice. Do this quickly, then try and do the paragraphs. After you’ve done this, go back to the questions and start checking.
  5. They usually test for a few broad topics. Identify if each sentence fits one of the patterns and answer accordingly. For the others, try and think what error they might want you to make. If you know you have the time, look at each answer in turn and identify the mistake in it. The most common ways for you to change a sentence would be:
  • Fragments: Try and see if each clause has a subject and a verb. Example: “In the dim light, making his way through the cave.” -> “In the dim light, he makes his way through the cave.”
  • Subject-verb agreement: Make sure that the subject is the one actually doing the action and singular/plural match. Example: “Gathering stones, the river was blocked by the men.” Did the river gather stones? No.
  • Consistency: Make sure that something introduced one way is always referred to like that (don’t switch out ‘one’ for ‘you’ or ‘they’). Make sure there are no extra linkers (”Since I was there, but he went too.”). Check if any verbs change tense when they shouldn’t. Don’t compare apples to oranges (”His homework was as good as John.” -> “As good as John’s”).
  • Adverb or adjective? If it describes a verb, it has a ‘ly’. Example: “She winked playful.” -> “She winked playfully.”
  • Singular or plural? Make sure not to refer to a plural object in singular. “Pandas, numbering in the hundreds now, is an endangered species.”
  • Prepositions, linkers, all the small words Sadly, you’ll have to know how they’re used.

Reading

  1. Word fill: Note the answers that obviously don’t make sense. Mark the one of the others that sounds best to you (in the answer sheet, too!). If you don’t know one or more of the words, aim for simplicity. After you’ve quickly answered all of the reading questions, come back to these. Look at the relationships between the gap and the sentence - are you looking for a positive or negative word? Antonyms or synonyms to something before? Try and guess what unknown words mean. This way, you will probably be able to eliminate all the wrong answers.
  2. Reading comprehension: You are not tested for understanding the text. Keep this in mind. What you are actually trying to do here is quickly find synonyms. If the question asks for “Was Anna’s family a) warm b) cold c) the spawn of Cthulhu?”, chances are that the text contains “Anna’s relatives acted chilly.” or something like that. Read the first question. Skim the text until it comes to that topic, then look for synonyms of the answers. Don’t make deductions! If you come across a ‘general message’ or ‘tone of the author’ question, skip it and answer it at the end of the text. The other questions will be in the same order as the answers are mentioned in the text. Checking: If you have time, look at each answer and try to see what in the text could mislead somebody to make that mistake.

Mathematics

  1. Calculator use: My advice would be to not bring a complex graphing calculator. They just slow you down. Try and do most operations by hand, then use the calculator only for, well, calculations.
  2. Basic topics to know: You are expected to be familiar with how to rearrange equations (ab=1 is the same as a=1/b) and solve linear and quadratics; cosine and Pythagorean theorems; number representations of lines and their intersections; median, mean and mode.
  3. Solve like a crab! One of the best things I learnt in “Fun Math” classes was that problems are solved more easily if you work from the answer back. Try and see what you would need (in terms of information) to find the answer. Then look back to the text of the problem - is what you need there? In most SAT problems, it is, or you can easily find it.
  4. Visualise: Especially for distance or geometry problems, make a small chart of what’s happening. Make lines for the distances the cars traveled or draw that pesky cylinder. Try and see in your mind how different elements move and which stay the same.

I guess this is all that I can say for now. Of course, this is my strategy so it might not work for everyone or it might not work without practice, so don’t think it’s a miracle solve-all. I’m always open for questions about ideas or specific problems, just write an ask~ And good luck to all future test-takers!