queen ann style

flickr

West MacArthur Boulevard by eric
Via Flickr:
Oakland, California July 2017 20170725_181010-1

flickr

I.W.P. Buchanan House - Lebanon, TN by Brent Moore
Via Flickr:
This home is stop #10 on the Historic Lebanon Driving tour. Here is the text from that brochure: 428 W. Main St. The Queen- Anne style Victorian house built by I.W.P. Buchanan is a George Barber design. 

4

Alexandra Dowling as Queen Anne of France

TV: BBC The Musketeers (2014-2016)

Season 3

Costumes by Hayley Nebauer

flickr

20170623.187.MA.Milton.EustisEstate.d.1878.WmRalphEmerson by J Russiello
Via Flickr:

Two Queen Anne style homes on Vinewood with metal fences and trees near street. Recorded in glass negative ledger: “D/Streets-Vinewood.” Date unknown.

  • Courtesy of the Burton Historical Collection, Detroit Public Library
4

Alexandra Dowling as Queen Anne

TV: BBC The Musketeers (2014-2016)

Season 3

Costumes by Hayley Nebauer

Looking Around: A Guide to Architecture

Hello Friends! After some feedback, I’ve decided to go back to my roots and do some less esoteric content than architectural theory (which I will, of course, return to - I’m thinking about starting a not-regular blog or a podcast about it.)  The purpose of this series is to give people the vocabulary they need to talk about houses and architecture in general! 

I don’t know if y’all know this but there’s a lot of different parts and styles of architecture. Everything in architecture has a name, whether it’s ornament, architectural styles, or stuff like parts of a roof - either way, we should all be empowered to talk about architecture. 

The good news is we all already know quite a bit about architecture.

Architecture speaks to us through personal experience. By looking at it long enough, you start to get a feel for it. Even amateurs can tell whether or not a house is new or old, even when the exterior has been significantly remodeled. Something just tells us - that’s an old house, or that’s a new house. The key to dating a house is to be able to pick out those codifiers - sometimes its a material (vinyl siding) or an architectural element such as window or dormer. 

Most of us can identify a house that fits the labels “Victorian,” “Colonial,” or “Modern.” That’s not so far off from the truth - it’s a matter of narrowing it down, being able to say that Victorian usually codifies a type of ornate house from the 19th century, or a new house built in what is more specifically called the Queen Anne style. Colonial has been a type of house since, well, the colonies - but there’s a big difference between a 2005 colonial and a 1804 colonial. Not to mention the myriad differences between Spanish, Dutch, or English subtypes. 

Because I don’t want to wait until next week to get this started, I’ll be posting the first article in this series on Friday - it’ll be about the Minimal Traditional style and how it has manifested itself in housing since the 1920s!

I hope you all enjoy this new series as much as I will!

flickr

Camellia Rose Inn, Gainesville by Steven Martin
Via Flickr:
The Camellia Rose Inn is one of several Victorian houses that have been converted to bed and breakfasts in the Southeast Gainesville Residential District. The district is a historic district that preserves most of Gainesville’s best remaining Victorian houses.

flickr

Queen Anne style row-house by eric
Via Flickr:
2517 Harrison Street, the Mission, San Francisco