I’ve worked with some great bass players and no one has quite had the same lyrical touch that John has. I think he’s very underrated.
—  Brian May on John Deacon [2008 Guitar Player Magazine interview]
Adam Lambert: 'The Music Industry Is Finally Starting To Realise Being Gay Doesn't Matter' - EXCLUSIVE

Adam Lambert knows all too well what it is like to be a gay man in the music industry. The flamboyant singer won the heart of the nation when he competed in American Idol a whopping six years ago, and hit the headlines when he officially came out as gay.

After causing controversy for his raunchy, same-sex dance moves at the beginning of his career, Adam appears to have toned down his theatrical performances by a landslide with the release of this new, much “moodier”, album, The Original High, and when we caught up with the star an an exclusive playback of the record, we decided to get his view on how times have changed within the industry.

“It’s a different world,” Adam tells us, “A lot has progressed, especially in America. It has always been a bit more forward over here [the UK], but I think the states are catching up.

"I think the people in the industry have realised that it doesn’t matter to people buying music, it just doesn’t make a difference, it’s not a big deal any more.”

AND BLOOMIN’ ‘ECK, ISN’T IT ABOUT TIME?!

Adam went on to share that he is happy now that his sexuality doesn’t define him as an artist, adding: “I like that we are moving towards a post-gay mentality where it doesn’t have to be the thing that defines you.

"It doesn’t have to be one of the facts and details about you as an artist; I don’t think it makes sense to be 'gay artist Adam Lambert’, it’s just not necessary.”

Adam also admitted to us that he felt at the beginning of his career, the media were trying to turn his sexuality into a scandal - specifically referencing the controversy caused when he kissed a male backing dancer on stage, as well as making sexually suggestive gestures, back in 2009.

He told us: “I don’t run a daycare centre, I’m not a babysitter. It was six years ago, I said that when I responded. I took some heat for choices made on stage, looking back I have no regrets at all but I have also learned a lot about what works when relating to the public.

"I love the power of media, I love what we can do and how we can push things forward, but then there’s the sensationalism that can happen and sometimes sensationalising somebody’s sexuality, for example, you are pushing the whole thing backwards.”

Still, the singer is confident that his new album won’t be making the same kind of headlines that his previous behaviour did - despite the fact it’s a lot “darker” and “moodier” than his fans are used to seeing.

He explained: “I’m definitely in a different space now, and I think The Original High has darker themes and it deals with real stuff that you experience in adulthood, but I also don’t think it’s irresponsible storytelling. I don’t think it’ll put wrong ideas in anyone’s heads.

"I think in the past my image was very theatrical and flamboyant, and it’s been great to make people smile but I feel like I’ve done a good amount of that and it was time to try something new and strip that back and be something real and not a character.

"I’m an actual person who does the same things you do and I live a normal life. I’m more comfortable within myself now, I think the whole American Idol thing happened so fast and your personal life goes into a bit of a tailspin.

"It’s been six years and I’m finally at a place where I feel comfortable; I don’t feel the need to please anybody.”

And we are ruddy happy to hear it - good to have you back, Adam, it had been far too long.