q. tip

Why you’re not improving your art

Have you ever felt like your art is on the same level for a long time? Have you ever felt like you can’t grow your skills. Have you ever felt like everyone around you grows in rapid speed and you are just like a snail at the end of the race?

I was thinking about that and trying to pinpoint the reasons why you might feel that way. I figured out some solutions that helped me and some other artists I know.

1. Not looking for critique/feedback

‘You can’t yourself pinpoint things you need to focus on because your eye still isn’t trained enough to pinpoint exact problems.’

This is number one problem I see and many professional artists will tell you about that. You can’t be too shy to show your work to people who can give you good critique. Look for professionals who are willing to help you and use that. Critiquing is mistaken to be something hurtful for young artists BUT in reality people giving feedback are trying to help you grow. I know how hard it is to hear that you are still not good enough, that your art is lacking something. Maybe you know that yourself but you can’t yourself pinpoint things you need to focus on because your eye still isn’t trained enough to pinpoint exact problems. The best person to go to would be professional with trained eyes who is able to say by flipping through your portfolio what it lacks and what you can do to make it look better. Don’t be afraid and seek that help. Don’t be too attached to your own art and accept that it isn’t perfect and you need a fresh pair of eyes to look at it.

2.  Not implementing the feedback

'Implementing is the key step in the process of growing.’

After you have done first step from my list and you finally found a professional willing to give you feedback try to implement feedback. Don’t just listen to it, nod few times pretending you understand what it being said. Don’t defend your art and don’t give excuses if the critique is genuine. Implementing is the key step in the process of growing. There is no use in feedback without you actually trying out the tips you were given. The whole point of that is to change your work. You are not being better artists by collecting thoughts about your art. Now it is time to do the work. It actually requires to put time and effort . Usually what people do,after receiving feedback, is  they pat themselves on back like it was 'job well done’ and being lazy. They are not willing to actually put in the work to implement feedback. It is time consuming and you need to put a lot of effort. Although without that there is not any point in seeking feedback.

3. Not trying/not failing enough

'Embrace failures as a valuable lessons.’

Yes! There is lesson in failure! As hard as it is to understand. Once you collect experience you grow from it and become wiser. You know what path to choose to avoid next time failure. Successful people are the ones that can try something many times before they finally succeed. When they finally succeed it’s just a result of many attempts they have made before. No one is born ready for challenge. People are scared to lose because for our psyche it hurts more than a win feels good. People will try avoid at any cost losing so at some point they give up and stop trying. You can’t say for sure you will be successful artist after you did it for a year and don’t see result. You are not the one deciding how long it takes. It will be done some day. some day you will meet your artistic goals. But you will only meet them by trying and failing probably hundred times on a way. Just don’t be afraid. Those mistakes on a way are path that differentiate you and a professional. They already failed many times to get to where they are now. When you understand that you will embrace failures as a valuable lessons.

4. Doing things that are not  challenging you.

'Feel uncomfortable and pick up this damn pencil and draw like no one else is watching!’

Don’t settle in your comfort zone. You’ve heard that already many times right? That is why. You limit your skillset. Good things come out of comfort zone. If you feel like you have problems drawing something you are probably right. The reason is you don’t challenge yourself enough to draw things that are difficult for you. For example if you are only drawing a boy in front view standing with hands straight it doesn’t sound like the most exciting art right? But what if it’s the only thing you can draw and it looks somewhat decent? Well then, solution for that is easy - experiment with different angles, experiment with expressions, with composition, with different species. Be brave here and discover topics you don’t draw. You art will become more interesting and you will be more confident drawing. Personally I know that this is the hardest part for artists. It is hard to let go of what we know and discover unknown. We feel vulnerable and  like we can’t really draw. This feeling sucks. As much as this feeling sucks you know what else sucks? Sucks that your skills are stagnating. Feel uncomfortable and pick up this damn pencil and draw like no one else is watching! I guarantee that after some time you will be surprised with what you created and how your art have changed.

Good luck to everyone who is on path of improvement!

mermaid self-care tips 🌊

- holding a shell up to your ear in times of panic, letting the distant humming calm you down

- soaking in a blue/green bath bomb + salt infused bath, absorbing the sweet energies of the water

- keeping little charms shaped like marine life in your pocket for good luck

- dabbing your jewelry with a tiny bit of ocean water before wearing, anointing it with the sea’s energy

- falling asleep to water sounds, letting the crashing waves provide the soundtrack to a peaceful slumber

Witch Tip

If you’re an established witch you’ve probably run into the “Good Gods Why Won’t This Paper Just Finish Burning Already” conundrum. I, too, used to suffer from the Eternal Fire of Ain’t Nobody Got Time For This, before I learned a simple, easy way of making that paper burn waaaaaaay faster.

Substitute your ordinary paper for a standard paper coffee filter. The thin material lights quickly, and burns out fast.

***always practice appropriate fire safety***

earth witch self-care tips 🌿

- take a therapeutic walk through nature, allowing your soul to wander and yourself to breathe

- meditate outdoors, paying extra close attention to the surrounding sounds and the feel of the sun on your skin

- place fresh flowers or a cute succulent near your bed to greet you each morning

- keep a small “boost bag” in your purse or pocket, filled with dried petals and herbs, a favorite crystal or stone, and a leaf/tree/animal shaped pendant

rain witch self-care tips 🌧

- allowing yourself rejuvenation through dancing under the rain

- gazing at majestic gray clouds and only finding inspiration in them

- keeping a rain-scented candle for those times in which you’re missing the cloudy days

- doing deep-breathing exercises outside (or in front of an open window) during storms, inhaling the freshness of the air

- likening yourself to the earth after a rainfall, utterly cleansed and purified

- drifting asleep to storm sounds

disclaimer - i’m not a career coach. this is just advice based on personal experience. as a business/marketing major i interviewed with companies like google, nike, philips, and am now interning at microsoft. these tips will not guarantee you a job and some things might not work in your country/industry (but hopefully they will help you along the way!)

1. your resume

  •  this is your ultimate marketing tool. make it work for you. i personally prefer resumes that are limited to 1 page.  it’s true that recruiters only glance at your cv for just a couple of seconds, so make yours stand out, yet keep it minimal/simple.
  • for each job, list bullet points and make them result-driven (and make your first bullet your best bullet).

(i will share some example layouts soon)

2. the application process / preparing for your interview

  • you have nothing to lose. see a job that interests you? just apply! even if you don’t meet all the requirements, it’s worth a shot. what’s the worst that can happen? you might think “but i’m not good enough for this job” - lemme tell ya, that mindset is not gonna land you ANY job at all. 
  • don’t wait until the application deadline. 
  • prepare a pitch about yourself and memorize this so you’re good to go when the interviewer asks you to tell something about yourself.
  • there are many websites out there that list basic interview questions. make sure you prepare for these. just google (common/top) interview questions”. make sure you have an answer in mind. 
  • it’s okay to indicate some of your weaknesses, but either conceal them with a strength or tell them that you’re working on improving yourself. no one is perfect. show that you’re eager to learn and grow. 
  • study the company. don’t just look at what they sell, but also study their mission, history and what they do “behind the scenes” (e.g. philanthropic initiatives). also have an answer to why you would want to work for this company (and why you choose them instead of their direct competitor).
  • ALWAYS prepare questions for the interviewer, too. one question that i like to ask is “what is one thing you DON’T like about working for this company?”. i have asked this to managers at google and microsoft, and some didn’t have an answer for me hehe. surprise them. 

3. the interview

  • BE YOURSELF! i can’t stress the importance of this enough. it’s totally ok to be nervous, but try to relax anyways!
  • practice a firm handshake.
  • always be prepared to elaborate on your cv and job experiences. this shouldn’t be a problem as long as you don’t lie on your cv lol. 
  • dont worry about awkward silences when the interviewer asks you a question. take some time to compose your answers rather than simply trying to bridge the silence by blurting out something . some companies also like to hear your think out loud.
  • take some time to get to know the interviewer. if s/he doesn’t do so already, ask the interviewer to tell something about themselves.
  • dress accordingly (some companies require you to dress smart, others are fine if you show up in a casual outfit). if you don’t know what the dresscode is, don’t be afraid to contact the recruiter about it. 
  • didn’t get the job? don’t be so hard on yourself. you tried your best, so consider your interviewing process a lesson and a training. 

4. on the job

  • networking is important. schedule coffee with your teammembers so you can get to know them better one on one (maybe you’ll even make some friends along the way). are you interested in what other teams or departments do? don’t be shy and get to know them too. (note: do check your organizational structure. by that i mean: don’t just schedule coffee with all senior managers and directors if that is not a part of your company culture lol)
  • if another intern is onboarding you and showing you the ins and outs, always take notes. you tell yourself you will remember everything, but trust me; you won’t. write down any instructions you receive and you will thank yourself later. 
  • never ever be afraid to ask questions. don’t be afraid to ask for help.
  • don’t be afraid of new challenges.  

if you have any q’s, shoot me a message. got any additional tips? feel free to send me those and i’ll add them to my list (ofc i’ll credit where due).

good luck everyone! 

anonymous asked:

Could you maybe show us an evolution of your drawings? (Even before this blog?) I love the fact that you are self-taught. I'm not good at drawing but I would love to give it a go, but I would appreciate some motivation by seeing your evolution (if you don't mind)? Big fan! x

Well, basically all digital art that I’ve drawn is posted on this blog, or at least on my dA account :) Although I did delete a few! So I guess I can bring them back… *cringe*

Okay so… In 2015 I got really into Harry Potter and was inspired by all those fanartists, so I tried drawing some stuff of my own. I didn’t have a tablet yet, I was just trying the waters, seeing if digital art is even something I’d be interested in. Here are Hermione and Draco’s portraits I did in mid-November 2015 (I think I was drawing with my mouse, or I might have been using a touch pen on my Asus laptop that has a touch screen, but it’s very tough to work with, not like a tablet at all, no pressure sensitivity, no precision)

Ugh the cringe…. :D

I mean if you scroll to the very bottom of my dA page you’ll find more stuff like this, if you’re interested.
But yeah, those portraits are pretty much the first digital drawings I’ve done.

Continuing with portraits, 4 months later (mid-March 2016) I did Hermione and Draco again, this time already using my graphic tablet and also using references:

Already much better! Yet, to me, still cringy :D I haven’t yet redrawin these portraits (I am planning to), but if we look at my newest portraits (from Ravenclaw set since that one’s the latest, it was completed in February 2017 which is almost a year later from the previous ones), you can see that I have improved a lot too!

They look so much cleaner, every brushstroke has much more purpose, there’s more symmetry and logic and all those things. I like how my portraits changed, not sure how others feel :)

The biggest change in my art was me starting to use references. It helps so much with getting proportions and perspective and body movements right.
And then it was just all about continuing to learn and polishing my style through practice and frequent drawing :) As I did more and more portraits, it sort of felt as though I’ve always been doing them the same way, as though my portraits look the same and no progress is done, but as you can see, during one year, the way I draw changed, or rather got a bit better and precise, so while it didn’t feel as though I’m improving as I’m drawing, when looking back, the progress is visible.

So just take your time :) Miracles won’t happen in a short period of time, especially if you don’t draw at least a couple of times a week (last year in spring-summer I drew like 5-12 drawings a week, so that totally made a difference). You will improve, I promise, but looking at other artists’ art, trying to figure out how they did it, trying out different tools, and learning from references will surely speed up the process of making progress. So yeah, I hope this helps a little :) Sorry I only showed portraits here, I just thought they’re good to show art evolution with since I drew so many of them. Good luck mate! <3