pyramid-of-the-sun

A team of physicists detected an energy beam coming through the top of the Bosnian Pyramid of the Sun. The radius of the beam is 4.5 meters with a frequency of 28 kHz. The beam is continuous and its strength grows as it moves up and away from the pyramid. This phenomenon contradicts the known laws of physics and technology.

This means that there is a perpetual motion machine in that pyramid that is working to this very day. This is surely very strange.

EDIT: For those of you asking, I’ve done research on this and honestly can’t find anything to prove this false. If it was PROVEN to be a hoax, I would not have published it.

 

10

Offerings found at the end of the 103m tunnel below the Temple of the Feather Serpent at Teotihuacan. At the end of this tunnel are three chambers that archaeologists believe may hold the remains of some of Teotihuacan’s rulers.

Items found include four stone sculptures (one male, three female)  decorated in jade and greenstone jewelry, dozens of shells from the Gulf coast, rubber balls, large cat bones, pyrite discs, a wooden box containing dozens of worked shells, more than 15,000 seeds of prickly bear, tomato, maize, and pumpkin flowers, pieces of amber, 4000 wooden objects in excellent condition, obsidian knives, slate and pyrite mirrors carved on one side, and traces of skin.

Article in Spanish about the offering

phys.org
Mexico archaeologists explore Teotihuacan tunnel (Update)

This Aug. 6, 2014 photo released by Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) shows a sculpture unearthed at the Teotihuacan archeological site in Mexico. Mexican archaeologists have concluded a yearslong exploration of a tunnel sealed nearly 2,000 years ago at the ancient city of Teotihuacan and found thousands of relics. Teotihuacan dominated central Mexico centuries before the rise of the Aztecs in the 14th century.

A yearslong exploration of a tunnel sealed almost 2,000 years ago at the ancient city of Teotihuacan yielded thousands of relics and the discovery of three chambers that could hold more important finds, Mexican archaeologists said Wednesday.

Project leader Sergio Gomez said researchers recently reached the end of the 340-foot (103-meter) tunnel after meticulously working their way down its length, collecting relics from seeds to pottery to animal bones.

A large offering found near the entrance to the chambers, some 59 feet (18 meters) below the Temple of the Plumed Serpent, suggests they could be the tombs of the city’s elite.

“Because this is one of the most sacred places in all Teotihuacan, we believe that it could have been used for the rulers to … acquire divine endowment allowing them to rule on the surface,” Gomez said.

Unlike at other pre-Columbian ruins in Mexico, archaeologists have never found any remains believed to belong to Teotihuacan’s rulers. Such a discovery could help shine light on the leadership structure of the city, including whether rule was hereditary.

“We have not lost hope of finding that, and if they are there, they must be from someone very, very important,” Gomez said.

So far Gomez’s team has excavated only about 2 feet (60 centimeters) into the chambers. A full exploration will take at least another year.

Initial studies by the National Institute of Anthropology and History show the tunnel functioned until around A.D. 250, when it was closed off.

Teotihuacan long dominated central Mexico and had its apex between 100 B.C. and A.D. 750. It is believed to have been home to more than 100,000 people, but was abandoned before the rise of the Aztecs in the 14th century.

Today it is an important archaeological site on the outskirts of Mexico City and a major tourist draw known for its broad avenues and massive pyramids.

This May 22, 2014 photo released by Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH), shows sculptures and shells unearthed by investigators at the Teotihuacan archeological site in Mexico. Mexican archaeologists have concluded a yearslong exploration of a tunnel sealed nearly 2,000 years ago at the ancient city of Teotihuacan and found thousands of relics. Teotihuacan dominated central Mexico centuries before the rise of the Aztecs in the 14th century

This Oct. 2, 2014 photo released by Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) shows shells unearthed by investigators at the Teotihuacan archeological site in Mexico. Mexican archaeologists have concluded a yearslong exploration of a tunnel sealed nearly 2,000 years ago at the ancient city of Teotihuacan and found thousands of relics. Teotihuacan dominated central Mexico centuries before the rise of the Aztecs in the 14th century.


This Nov. 19, 2013 photo released by Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH), shows sculptures unearthed by investigators at the Teotihuacan archeological site in Mexico. Mexican archaeologists have concluded a yearslong exploration of a tunnel sealed nearly 2,000 years ago at the ancient city of Teotihuacan and found thousands of relics. Teotihuacan dominated central Mexico centuries before the rise of the Aztecs in the 14th century.

This May 22, 2014 photo released by Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) shows sculptures unearthed at the Teotihuacan archeological site in Mexico. Mexican archaeologists have concluded a yearslong exploration of a tunnel sealed nearly 2,000 years ago at the ancient city of Teotihuacan and found thousands of relics. Teotihuacan dominated central Mexico centuries before the rise of the Aztecs in the 14th century

The tunnel and chambers in relation to the Temple

Mexico finds fire-god figure at top of Pyramid of the Sun

MEXICO CITY– Did the rulers of the ancient city of Teotihuacan dedicate their largest pyramid to the god of fire, the so-called old god with a signature beard and fire atop his head?

Mexican archaeologists announced this week that a figure of the god, called Huehueteotl, was found in a covered pit at the apex of the Pyramid of the Sun at Teotihuacan, a popular archaeological site north of Mexico City.

Excavations are ongoing, but the discovery suggests that a long-disappeared temple at the top of the pyramid was used to perform ritual offerings to the fire god, Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, or INAH, said in a statement Monday. Read more.

youtube

Findings in the tunnel of the Temple of the Feathered Serpent