puttanesca sauce

anonymous asked:

Got any advice for food on a budget? I don't have much money. Even ways to spice up ramen will help.

Eating On A Budget

- Buy Bulk. My number one tip for budgeting food is to BUY IN BULK. Instead of buying a chicken breast, buy eight and individually wrap them in plastic wrap. Freeze what you’re not going to eat within the next two days, and defrost as needed.

- Cook Bulk. Make a large pot of chili, soup, or your favorite pasta sauce. Buy plastic containers at Walmart and portion out your meals. Freeze them all! I do this with my pasta puttanesca sauce, I make it once every six months and cook enough to last.

- Store Brands. There are cheap knock off brands of everything from Cheez-Its to Quaker Oats. They’ll be anywhere from $1-$3 cheaper than the brand names. On a similar note, store brand cleaning supplies is about $5 cheaper than the name brands! Don’t judge them before you try them.

- Store Cards. My Stop & Shop card gives me a gas discount, and other store cards offer similar perks. Store card + store brands = ridiculous savings.

- Avoid Organics. Like I said in my last Adulting post, I’m not paying $4 for a cucumber unless it can clean my apartment and sing Jazz standards. Buy vegetables, but avoid anything labeled “organic”.

- Mixed Greens. Avoid buying “mixed greens” unless you’re going to eat them within a day or two, these have a very short shelf life. Instead, buy a head of lettuce or a bushel of kale.

- Frozen Produce. Stock your freezer with bags of peas, carrots, fruit, etc. These will defrost easily in your soups and are good if you run out of ice packs.

- Dollar Stores. They have really weird brands of chips and pasta and really poor quality paper towels, so don’t expect to do you entire shop here. However, they sell bulk tomato sauce, six packs of ramen, tuna fish and other wonderful things for under a dollar. My local Dollar store sells tubes of capers for a dollar when just down the street my organic supermarket sells them for upwards of $5.

- Buy Fruit. Specifically, BUY IN BULK at your local chain supermarket. My boyfriend and I have been throwing back those Cara Cara oranges like nobody’s business. Fruit is great for quick breakfasts, snacks, and a healthy alternative to downing a pint of Ben and Jerrys.

Budget-based cookbooks (online recipes)

- College Student Cookbook. Click here.

- Meals On The Go. Click here. (Not a cookbook, but super helpful)

- Broke College Kid Masterpost. Click here.

- Cooking on A Bootstrap. Click here.

- Good and Cheap. Click here.

- Budget Bytes. Click here.

It’s also worth checking out my “eating on a budget” tag.

Also, please check out “Pimp Your Ramen” for ramen-related hacks!

Good luck! XX

okay but consider this
vampire chefs
vampires that love to cook even though they can’t or don’t eat anymore
vampires who come from cultures with rich culinary backgrounds, vampires who still love the feeling of rice in their hands and the smell of curry in the air
vampires who try new recipes on their friends and their friends go “this is good” and the vampire goes “but what else does it need?
vampires who are always on the hunt for the perfect spice to replace garlic
vampires who perfect blood pudding recipes
vampires who grieve that they will never have their grandfather’s puttanesca sauce again, who regret the fact that their mother’s meatloaf will never taste the same, but they make them anyway
vampires who work out their guilt and sorrow while punching and kneading the dough for bread
vampires who love a good rare steak with just a hint of lemon and rosemary and peppercorns
vampire chefs!!

Together - Klaus Baudelaire

Klaus Baudelaire x Reader

Word Count: 2619

Warnings: Child abuse.

You were done for. That was all you ever thought. Every thought you had you thought to be your last. It was in your nature. Living in a household alone with an evil man who sings horrible songs and thinks too highly of himself is a nightmare. Basic human nature teaches us to run from the tiger. You had nowhere to run. So naturally when you finally had company it was very hard to get used to. Company almost always meant cooking roast beef and opening expired and ages old very dirty wine. This company was different. It was, instead of the Count’s ugly theater troupe, more children. Their names’ were Violet, Klaus, and Sunny. You knew them to be the Baudelaire children; whose parents had recently died in a horrible fire. You had read the news and heard Count Olaf plotting to take their family fortune. They were interesting children nonetheless, so you decided to help them. You, dear readers, cannot understand the story if you don’t hear it all so let’s back up, shall we?

Keep reading

Tomato Sauce

There is nothing that I love more than a bowl of pasta with tomato sauce. Tomato sauce is inexpensive, versatile, and so easy to make. You can literally let it stew for hours unattended while you do your thing. I am known amongst my friends and family as the tomato sauce queen. Here are some of my tips and also some of my favorite recipes. 🍅 

Thick Tomato Sauce 

The only way to make thick tomato sauce is to use canned tomatoes. Fresh tomatoes create a thinner sauce. Trust me. Don’t believe the haters who say that a complex sauce can’t be created in a half hour. They are liars! Thick tomato sauce is great for anything from ravioli to shells. It’s also better for weird pasta shapes (like wheels) than thin pasta, because it coats better. 

1. Pricing. There are different qualities of canned tomatoes, different brands costing anywhere from 89 cents to $6.00. You can taste a slight difference with the tomatoes themselves, but not enough to warrant dropping lots of money. I recommend just going to your local Dollar Store and buying bulk cans of whatever is cheapest. One 12 oz can of tomatoes makes two meals for me.

2. Canned variety. Sometimes I like to buy “fire roasted tomatoes” or “herbed tomatoes” to mix it up. Even with the stronger varieties, any initial taste they have will be mostly covered up by whatever you put in the sauce. Remember: fresh herbs are always better than dried ones! 

3. Building your sauce. If you’re going to put anything that needs cooking in your sauce (NOT meat, but any garlic, onions, mushrooms, carrots) cook these in a sauce pan first. Use oil, not butter. Add any dried herbs or spices you want to this initial mix. 

4. Get going. Add your tomato sauce to the pan and get it bubbling. Now is the time to add anything that doesn’t need cooking (olives, capers, anchovies, pickled anything). I like to use brines in my sauces, so I add them at this point. For example, if I’m making a puttanesca sauce, I’ll add my black olives and pour the black olive juice right into my pan. 

5. Taste it. Take a spoonful and taste it. If you don’t like it’s taste, add some more spices. If it’s too acidic, add tomato paste. At this point you can either turn it on low and let it cook for an hour, which creates a very rich and thick sauce. Or, you can cook some meat or veggies and add your fresh herbs. Always ad your fresh herbs in right before you’re about to eat! Otherwise they’ll wilt and you won’t taste their flavor. 

Some easy thick sauces:

  • Puttanesca: From Series of Unfortunate events (and also Italy). Cook garlic and onions first. Don’t let them brown too much, just get them not raw. Add your canned tomatoes, let the sauce sizzle while adding salt and pepper (don’t go crazy on the salt). Add anchovies, black olives, capers, and other pickled things (pickled mushrooms, jalapeños, pearl onions, etc). Pour your black olive juice right into the sauce pan. Let it cook until the sauce has absorbed the olive juice. Top with cheese.
  • Marinara: Brown some garlic and onions in olive oil. Add tomato paste to the pan after the onions and garlic have turned golden, and swirl it around so that it gets toasted. Add your canned tomatoes and any dried herbs you may be using (thyme, parsley, oregano… but be gentle with your oregano pouring). Let reduce if you added the dried herbs, otherwise add fresh herbs and serve immediately. Put this on your pizza or in your lasagna. 
  • Bolognese: Cook your meat first with oil, seasoning with cumin, garlic powder, pepper and salt. Or whatever spice blend you enjoy. Remove the cooked meat, and use the juices as the base for your tomato sauce. Pour your canned tomatoes and mix the sauces. Add chopped carrots or your other favorite vegetables. Cook until the veggies are fork tender, and add your meat back in. Hearty and warming! 

Thin Tomato Sauce 

This type of sauce always reminds me of summertime at my parent’s house when my mom would make her basil tomato sauce (see bellow). A thin sauce doesn’t have to be lighter than a thick sauce, but it definitely interacts with pasta differently and really needs a long pasta or a penne pasta to properly pick it up.

1. Fresh tomatoes. You don’t need to spend your lifesavings on beautiful heirloom tomatoes (in fact I’d urge you to just eat any heirloom tomato you happen upon raw). Any old tomato will do, even ones that are starting to sag and move towards the end of their lives. One fresh tomato makes two meals for me.

2. Cutting tomatoes. Cut the bottom of the tomato off and slice your tomato that way, cutting into the core. This way, no part of your tomato goes unused. For quick cooking, chop the tomato up small. If you have more time, leave large chunks to caramelize. You get a bit more flavor this way, but we don’t all have the luxury of time, so don’t stress about it.

3. Sauce base. With this type of tomato sauce, your base is 90% oil. The tomatoes themselves aren’t heavy enough to carry themselves, so do not skimp on the oil. I recommend cooking garlic and onions and browning them before adding your tomatoes. Allow them to dissolve into the sauce while you do your dishes or whatever. 

4. Acidity. Fresh tomatoes can make for a really acidic sauce. Make sure to cook some veggies or meat to help balance out the flavor. Cook these in a separate pan while your tomatoes are reducing. Remove them, and pour their juices into the sauce. I recommend bacon. 

5. Too much reducing/gloppy sauce. You may have to add water if your sauce becomes too reduced. Don’t worry if you add too much water, just let the sauce reduce to a comfortable consistency. Add your fresh herbs minutes before it’s done. I would skip the spices or dried herbs, their taste is too powerful for this sort of sauce. 

Some easy thin sauce combos: 

  • Hello onion: Caramelize half an onion. Chop it up into thin slices so that it will cook faster. Cook bacon and pour the drippings over the cooking onion. Add your fresh tomatoes and add water to help everything reduce. Be careful adding salt, the pasta will have salt from the bacon juices already. Add the crumbled bacon after you’ve turned the sauce off. 
  • Mom’s basil sauce: Using olive oil and chopped garlic, cook tomatoes with salt and pepper. Add basil when the tomatoes have reduced. 
  • Veggie blast: Brown onions and garlic (or not). After they’ve browned, add your favorite veggies to the sauce. I have a soft spot for squashes so I like to use eggplant and whatever squash we have in our fridge. I encourage you to get creative and to try different things. Add your tomatoes shortly after adding your veggies, because you don’t want the veggies to overcook and becoming mushy. Add spinach or kale after the sauce has reduced, and season heavily with salt and pepper. Seriously, veggies need salt.

The Festa dei sette pesci (Feast of the 7 Fishes), aka La Vigilia, is an Italian celebration of Christmas Eve with meals of fish and other seafood. Today, it’s a meal that typically consists of 7 seafood dishes. It originates in Southern Italy, where it is known as The Vigil (La Vigilia) and celebrates the wait for the midnight birth of the baby Jesus. The long tradition of eating seafood on Christmas Eve dates from the Roman Catholic tradition of abstinence. In this case, refraining from the consumption of meat or dairy – on Wednesdays, Fridays and (in the Latin Church) Saturdays, as well as during Lent and on the eve of specific holy days. As no meat or animal fat (there is no prohibition on dairy) could be used on such days, observant Catholics would instead eat fish, typically fried in oil.

It is unclear when the term “Feast of the 7 Fishes” was popularized. The meal may actually include 7,8 or even 9 specific fishes that are considered traditional. “Seven” fishes as a fixed concept or name is unknown in Italy itself. The most famous fish dish for Southern Italians is baccalà (salted cod fish). The custom of celebrating with a simple fish such as baccalà reflects customs in what were historically greatly impoverished regions of Southern Italy, as well as seasonal factors. Fried smelts, calamari and other types of seafood have been incorporated into the Christmas Eve dinner over the years.

There are many hypotheses for what the “7” represents. It’s the most repeated number in the Bible and appears over 700 times. One popular theory is the number represents completion, as shown in Genesis 2:2: “By the 7th day God completed the work he had been doing; so on the7th day he rested from all his work.” During the feast of the 7 fishes, participants celebrate the completion of God’s promise of the Messiah through baby Jesus. Other theories include: that the number represents the 7 Sacraments of the Roman Catholic Church; or the 7 hills of Rome. It may represent perfection (the traditional Biblical number for divinity is 3, and for Earth is 4, and the combination of these numbers represents God on Earth, or Jesus Christ).

The meal’s components may include some combination of anchovies, whiting, lobster, sardines, dried salt cod, smelts, eels, squid, octopus, shrimp, mussels, and clams. The menu may also include pastas, vegetables, baked or fried kale patties, baked goods and wine. Popular dishes include:

Baccalà (salt cod) with pasta, as a salad or fried - Baked cod - Clams casino - Cod fish balls in tomato sauce - Coryphaena (dolphinfish) - Deep fried calamari - Deep fried cod - Deep fried fish/shrimp - Deep fried scallops - Fried smelts - Insalata di mare (seafood salad) - Linguine with anchovy, clam, lobster, tuna, or crab sauce - Marinated or fried eel - Octopus salad - Oyster shooters - Puttanesca traditional tomato sauce with anchovies - Scungilli salad (sea snail) - Shrimp cocktail - Stuffed calamari in tomato sauce - Stuffed-baked lobsters - Stuffed-baked quahogs - Whiting

“She stared miserably at Olaf’s plate of food and found herself wishing she had bought poison at the market and put it in the puttanesca sauce.” -The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket 

Spaghetti alla Puttanesca 

Ingredients

  • 1 package of spaghetti
  • 4 or 5 fresh tomatoes, diced, or one can of diced tomatoes
  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced
  • A handful of olives and capers, diced
  • 3 tablespoons (approx.) of olive oil
  • Parsley for garnish 
  • Salt, pepper, sugar, and red pepper flakes to taste
  • [optional] Anchovies 

Directions

  1. Cook the pasta according to package directions in lightly salted water. When done, toss with olive oil.
  2. While the pasta is cooking, sauté the garlic¹ and anchovies in olive oil. 
  3. Once the garlic is browned, add the tomatoes to the pan. Reduce, a word which here means “thickening a liquid by cooking over a low heat.” If the sauce is too tart, add a pinch of sugar. 
  4. Add the olives and capers, and stir. Season with salt, black pepper, and red pepper to taste. 
  5. Spoon sauce over spaghetti. Serve with a sprig or two of parsley. 


¹To prevent the garlic from sticking to the knife, sprinkle each clove with salt before cutting. 

anonymous asked:

Could you give tips on how to grocery shop properly to make it last 2 weeks (so from one paycheck to another) as a college student? I'm a commuter student so I'm not on a meal plan at my school but I don't want to buy food on campus everyday. I don't know if this additional info is useful but I'll be going to classes 5 days a week. Thanks!

This is so doable! My boyfriend and I actually do our big shop once every three weeks. We’ll go out for toilet paper and that kind of stuff, but we do try to buy enough food to make it last. 

Shopping Tips

- Buy Bulk. My number one tip for budgeting food is to BUY IN BULK. Instead of buying a chicken breast, buy eight and individually wrap them in plastic wrap. Freeze what you’re not going to eat within the next two days, and defrost as needed.

- Cook Bulk. Make a large pot of chili, soup, or your favorite pasta sauce. Buy plastic containers at Walmart and portion out your meals. Freeze them all! I do this with my pasta puttanesca sauce, I make it once every six months and cook enough to last.

- Store Brands. There are cheap knock off brands of everything from Cheez-Its to Quaker Oats. They’ll be anywhere from $1-$3 cheaper than the brand names. On a similar note, store brand cleaning supplies is about $5 cheaper than the name brands! Don’t judge them before you try them.

- Store Cards. My Stop & Shop card gives me a gas discount, and other store cards offer similar perks. Store card + store brands = ridiculous savings.

- Avoid Organics. Like I said in my last Adulting post, I’m not paying $4 for a cucumber unless it can clean my apartment and sing Jazz standards. Buy vegetables, but avoid anything labeled “organic”.

- Mixed Greens. Avoid buying “mixed greens” unless you’re going to eat them within a day or two, these have a very short shelf life. Instead, buy a head of lettuce or a bushel of kale.

- Frozen Produce. Stock your freezer with bags of peas, carrots, fruit, etc. These will defrost easily in your soups and are good if you run out of ice packs.

- Dollar Stores. They have really weird brands of chips and pasta and really poor quality paper towels, so don’t expect to do you entire shop here. However, they sell bulk tomato sauce, six packs of ramen, tuna fish and other wonderful things for under a dollar. My local Dollar store sells tubes of capers for a dollar when just down the street my organic supermarket sells them for upwards of $5.

- Buy Fruit. Specifically, BUY IN BULK at your local chain supermarket. My boyfriend and I have been throwing back those Cara Cara oranges like nobody’s business. Fruit is great for quick breakfasts, snacks, and a healthy alternative to downing a pint of Ben and Jerrys.

Budget-based cookbooks (online recipes)

- College Student Cookbook. Click here.

- Meals On The Go. Click here. (Not a cookbook, but super helpful)

- Broke College Kid Masterpost. Click here.

- Cooking on A Bootstrap. Click here.

- Good and Cheap. Click here.

- Budget Bytes. Click here.

I hope this helps!

anonymous asked:

Do you have any food shopping tips? xx

Food Shopping Tips

- Buy Bulk. My number one tip for budgeting food is to BUY IN BULK. Instead of buying a chicken breast, buy eight and individually wrap them in plastic wrap. Freeze what you’re not going to eat within the next two days, and defrost as needed.

- Cook Bulk. Make a large pot of chili, soup, or your favorite pasta sauce. Buy plastic containers at Walmart and portion out your meals. Freeze them all! I do this with my pasta puttanesca sauce, I make it once every six months and cook enough to last.

- Store Brands. There are cheap knock off brands of everything from Cheez-Its to Quaker Oats. They’ll be anywhere from $1-$3 cheaper than the brand names. On a similar note, store brand cleaning supplies is about $5 cheaper than the name brands! Don’t judge them before you try them.

- Store Cards. My Stop & Shop card gives me a gas discount, and other store cards offer similar perks. Store card + store brands = ridiculous savings.

- Avoid Organics. Like I said in my last Adulting post, I’m not paying $4 for a cucumber unless it can clean my apartment and sing Jazz standards. Buy vegetables, but avoid anything labeled “organic”.

- Mixed Greens. Avoid buying “mixed greens” unless you’re going to eat them within a day or two, these have a very short shelf life. Instead, buy a head of lettuce or a bushel of kale.

- Frozen Produce. Stock your freezer with bags of peas, carrots, fruit, etc. These will defrost easily in your soups and are good if you run out of ice packs.

- Dollar Stores. They have really weird brands of chips and pasta and really poor quality paper towels, so don’t expect to do you entire shop here. However, they sell bulk tomato sauce, six packs of ramen, tuna fish and other wonderful things for under a dollar. My local Dollar store sells tubes of capers for a dollar when just down the street my organic supermarket sells them for upwards of $5.

- Buy Fruit. Specifically, BUY IN BULK at your local chain supermarket. My boyfriend and I have been throwing back those Cara Cara oranges like nobody’s business. Fruit is great for quick breakfasts, snacks, and a healthy alternative to downing a pint of Ben and Jerrys.

Budget-based cookbooks (online recipes)

- College Student Cookbook. Click here.

- Meals On The Go. Click here. (Not a cookbook, but super helpful)

- Broke College Kid Masterpost. Click here.

- Cooking on A Bootstrap. Click here.

- Good and Cheap. Click here.

- Budget Bytes. Click here.

It’s also worth checking out my “eating on a budget” tag.

so casual reminder that i am 42 years old and for lunch i just boiled an entire box of spaghetti, poured an entire bottle of puttanesca sauce over it, and i’m just gonna pick at it for like the next 24 hours.

adulting.

So Neighborly (short fic)

Originally posted by telefilmaddictedforever

Recent talk of Oliver Queen staying at home while Felicity went to work got my imagination going. This is a fluffy little piece. Hope you like it. Please share and look into my other fics if you like. 

This is also available at Ao3. 

They moved into the Tudor-style house on a weekend. The whole event was a blissful blur. Oliver never said the words aloud, but he loved that the house reminded him a little bit of the Queen Mansion with its stucco and beams. The events of recent years didn’t taint his childhood memories and being happy now reminded him that he had been happy then, blissfully unaware of the ills of the world. Still, this was a modest house with three bedrooms, not eight and it sat on .56 acres rather than an expanse worthy of a park.

Felicity had different reasons for loving the house. It was theirs. Not a rental, like all of the other places she had lived. An actual home with a foundation and a yard and a fireplace. And it was only 10 miles from Queen, Inc.’s headquarters in Starling City, which meant that she could take off her CEO hat at the end of the day and be wrapped in Oliver’s arms in less than thirty minutes in good traffic. An executive of her stature typically lived in an aspirational house, something large and impressive. But for Oliver Queen and Felicity Smoak this house was aspirational, reflecting the warmth and coziness they aspired to in their life together.

Keep reading

PUTTAnesca sauce!

-Christ! That’s the Blacklister? Excuse me, who gave you the right to have such a sexy voice??

-Sexy voice just got his ass whipped.

-ah Red. You and your planes.

-Navabi is the new Liz y'all.

-“Yes Donald.”

-Liz. Don’t be a bitch… Red is totally fucking right-and you’re totally not helping by defending El Nuevo Sucio.

-Oh my God Liz. The real snake here is FUCKIN KIRK AND YOUR DIRTY EL SUCIO OF A HUSBAND.

-IT’S BAZ!!!!!!! He’s my favorite 😊

-AW. Sexy voice is dead.

-omggggg. Shirtless Aram!

-it’s gonna be Red interrupting the sexy times!

-dude-I love these freaking sessions with Red where he pulls his squad together 😄.

-“Excuse me, sweetheart.” Red and Samar are gonna get it on. I called it. Liz is too blind to jump him first.

-If Liz is acting about being pissed of at Red but it really pissed then WHAT THE FUCK IS GOING THE FUCK ON? YOU’RE ALL FUCKING LIARS.

-RED! SAVE MR. KAPLAN!!

-our BOI SAID IT. A FUCKING FABRICATED DNA TEST.

-since when THE FUCK DOES SHE SPEAK RUSSIAN!?

-why hello KATE LORD! You fucking shit face!

-omg look at Samar’s face she just wants to protect Aram.

-OH MY GOD MY POOR BABY!

-*bitch-face and bitch-voice.* I’ve got my own rubber ducky!

-aww. He was having happy times by binge-watching shit.

-omg. She’s got her mans back.

-MESS THAT BITCH UP, SAMAR.

-Red and Cooper are having a coffee date!

-ooooooooooooooooh my fucking God Liz.

-did Aram just call her a Puta!? I think he ducking did!

-Aram’s first undercover mission: FAILED. 😄 you cinnamon roll.

-I like how Ressler was just exasperated at Aram and Samar’s just like: bitch shut the fuck up he’s fine.

-Ressler totally fucking looked at Samar when Aram said he’s in love with someone else 😄😄😄

-I’d kill a bitch if I knew they were running criminal shit from my fucking place.

-“QUACK QUACK BITCH”

-I don’t fucking understand. Liz pulled wool over her eyes left and right whenever Red tried FUCKING TELLING HER THE TRUTH. AND THIS COMPLETE FUCKUP JUST COMES WALTZING IN AND SHE IMMEDIATELY BELIEVES HIM?!!

-AND ON TOP OF THAT SHE’S FUCKING BETRAYING HER FRIENDS WHO RISKED THEIR LIVES FOR HER AND HER DAUGHTER AND RED WHO’S SAVED HER LIFE COUNTLESS TIMES!

-ahhhhhh yes. You know now that you fucked up Liz. But she honest to fuck DOES NOT know what the fuck she wants anymore does she? She doesn’t want to kill Kirk because he’s her daddy, but she also knows she’s nothing but a cure to his illness? And she hates Red but doesn’t want to risk him either?

-AWWWWWWWW YISSSSSSS. SAMAR IS HAPPENING.

OH MAH GHERRRRRRRRD. RED AND AGNES!

-EAT SHIT KIRK.

-oh, Mr. Kaplan.

-so they’re gonna get a place of their own, and Agnes is gonna get taken again, and it’s gonna be like Taken 3 yes?

Originally posted by yourreactiongifs