punishment-stone

Sami Kosba adds the picture of a third son killed by the IDF to his wall
Bullets fired at close range by an IDF brigade commander killed 17-year-old Mohammad Kosba – the third son in the family to be shot dead for stone throwing. A fourth son was also shot and seriously wounded
By Gideon Levy
The large stone that struck the front windshield of the military jeep shattered the glass. The early-morning traffic last Friday morning at A-Ram, outside Jerusalem, was grindingly slow, bumper to bumper.

The brigade commander in the jeep was seething, apparently, and decided to punish the stone-thrower immediately. In this situation – after the stone had been thrown and the vehicle had come to a halt without anyone being hurt – the brigade commander’s life could not have been said to be in serious danger.

Nevertheless, Israel Defense Forces Col. Yisrael Shomer and the driver emerged from the vehicle, weapons at the ready. There was a shout to halt; one youth obeyed, the other tried to flee. Shomer and his driver gave spirited chase and then, from a few steps away, a distance of six or seven meters, the youngster was shot at least three times with live ammunition. All the rounds slammed into his upper body – face, chest and back. Shooting with intent to kill.

The youth, Mohammad Kosba, 17, collapsed on the main road, blood flowing profusely from his mouth and nose. According to testimonies collected by Iyad Hadad, the Ramallah area field researcher for Israel’s B’Tselem human rights organization, the brigade commander then got back into the jeep and drove off without summoning medical aid.

A Palestinian eyewitness told Hadad that he saw Shomer (or his driver) approach the wounded youth and turn him over with his leg, apparently to see what his condition was.

In Israel, the brigade commander’s heroism drew universal acclaim and admiration, from MK Yair Lapid to the head of the IDF Central Command. By the time Mohammad Kosba arrived in a Ramallah hospital, after being evacuated by a private car and then transferred to an ambulance, he was dead.

Mohammad was the third son of Fatma and Sami Kosba, indigent residents of the Qalandiyah refugee camp, to be shot dead by the IDF, all for throwing stones. His two brothers – Yasser, who was 10 at the time, and Samer, 15 – were shot and killed within a period of 40 days in the winter of 2002. Five years later, their brother Thamer was seriously wounded when he was shot by soldiers for no apparent reason.

Now the IDF has killed Mohammad, too. The boy of four whom I met when I visited the doubly bereaved family 13 years ago, following the deaths of his two brothers, is now also buried in the Qalandiyah cemetery, not far away.

A piece of cardboard now covers the mound of dirt and the blood-saturated garbage in the center of the main road – next to the divider, in the middle of a very busy intersection, on the main road between Qalandiyah and the A-Ram neighborhood – where Mohammad fell. Traffic here is always indescribably chaotic.

The intersection was, of course, jammed early last Friday, too, ahead of the Ramadan prayer service in Al-Aqsa Mosque in nearby Jerusalem, as masses of worshipers made their way there from all parts of the West Bank. Mohammad Kosba and his friend Haroun Hazoun, who both recently finished 10th grade, arrived there shortly after 6 A.M. Their purpose, according to Sami Kosba, was to join the volunteers who were helping direct traffic at the intersection. The teens recognized the brigade commander’s jeep, which arrived at the intersection from the direction of the Adam settlement. One of them approached the vehicle and hurled the stone into the windshield, bringing about Mohammad’s almost instantaneous death.

Memorial posters commemorating him, pasted hastily onto the cement blocks on the roadside, now attest to the events here.

The IDF Spokesperson’s Unit stated this week: “A Military Police investigation is under way in this matter. Upon its conclusion, the findings will be passed on for examination to the Military Advocate General’s Unit.”

The days of mourning were still at their height when we visited the family’s meager home at the refugee camp’s entrance, not far from the scene of the incident.

It’s the same home I visited in February 2002, after which I wrote the column “Sami Kosba’s 40 days.” In this dwelling the sons have been taken at an incomprehensible rate.

“No one forgets his sons,” Sami says dryly, glancing at the commemorative posters for Yasser and Samer, to which Mohammad’s has now been added. (There’s also a joint poster of all three dead boys on the home’s wall).

“This officer who killed Mohammad wanted to punish the person who threw a stone at his car,“ Sami adds. "I wasn’t there, so I don’t know if it was Mohammad or someone else. But what difference does that make? Was he endangering the officer’s life at the time he was shot? To leave the jeep and shoot my son in the back? When people on the Israeli side are killed, Israel leaves no stone unturned and finds whoever did it and puts them on trial. But when they kill our people, is anyone tried?”

The father’s face hasn’t changed much since our previous meeting, during his earlier bereavement: the same fatigue and gloominess, the same anguish and pain and dry eyes – and the same inner strength, which is so hard to understand. There are no tears in this house, certainly not in the presence of strangers, only faces steeped in great suffering.

In the years that passed since Sami lost two sons, he had to deal with the serious wound sustained by his son Thamer, who was shot in the stomach for no clear reason in 2007, in the supermarket where he worked in, during an IDF raid. Thamer is still suffering, both physically and mentally. After he recovered he was tried and convicted of stone-throwing; his father says he had to pay a fine of 20,000 shekels (about $5,000). Sami continues to provide for his family from the earnings of his small kiosk next to the refugee camp’s school. Mohammad helped out there during summer vacations, including the current one.

Last Friday, Mohammad went to pray in the mosque at 4 A.M., and afterward ate the pre-fast Ramadan meal with his father. Sami went back to sleep, Mohammad headed for the Qalandiyah checkpoint. He hoped he would be able to sneak into Jerusalem, in order to pray at Al-Aqsa. He’d succeeded the week before, but the procedures for entering Jerusalem had been toughened since then as punishment for the killing of Malachi Rosenfeld near the settlement of Shvut Rachel a few days earlier. Sami tried to persuade his son not to try to get to Al-Aqsa. “It’s dangerous,” he told him.

At about 7 A.M., the eldest son, Taher, woke his father to tell him that Mohammad had been wounded and was in the Ramallah Government Hospital. About an hour earlier, around 6 A.M., the family’s youngest child, 10-year-old Iman, had called Mohammad to ask him where he was. He told her he was helping direct traffic next to the Qalandiyah checkpoint.

Sami and Fatma rushed to the hospital, but Mohammad was no longer among the living.

Taher, 32, now shows us photographs of his brother’s body, on his computer, with all the entry and exit points of the bullets and the congealed blood around the nose. He also has a video clip showing the removal of the bullet from his brother’s face at the hospital, after his death. Sami’s sister, Fathiya, collapsed when she heard the news and has been hospitalized since at Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem; she has a blue Israeli ID card. Fatma, the mother, is closeted in her room, and Sami received the few condolence callers who arrived during our visit.

Everything is in God’s hands, he says.

anonymous asked:

When one is enlightened, they say that you no longer create karma. Jesus Christ, they say, did not sin. I believe Jesus was enlightened. Perhaps sin is a similar concept to karma? What do you think?

I believe that you are overthinking this. Jesus was a man. He certainly “sinned” from a Jewish perspective. He broke the sabbath many times. He uttered a curse against a figtree. Curses were forbidden as witchcraft under penalty of death. He took biblical passages out of context to teach his own message rather than those of tradition. He interfered with the “just” punishment of an adulteress. He brought violence into the Temple environs. He claimed (so they say) to be the son of God which would be a great blasphemy punishable by stoning.

Depressing thoughts that can't be helped. Maybe?

Sometimes I wake up with a horrible pain in my chest. It’s like hunger pains in my heart…in my soul. A black hole, consuming me from within….my emotions. I’m in pain, so much pain, it becomes unbearable, each day more and more. A medieval punishment, stone after stone upon my chest, are the years of pain and horrible unforgiving unrelenting merciless events. Additions each day, fully dependent on the ones before. Upon completion, perhaps an intricate stone mason’s work. Perhaps each event becomes the roots of this rotten tree, feeding on pain and bloody tears, hardly allowing me to bare fruit. Most of the time I curse the heavens for my pain…It hurts all the time, today is just today and tomorrow, tomorrow I fear the unexpected. Always on alert, flinching unexpectedly. The world around me holds much pain. I never know when, but I always know its coming. Relieve will come one day…such, keeps me going.

vimeo

I’m king Jeshu JAH mashiach moreh-tzedek avatar Mahdi Messiah maitreya HOLY Quran surah 43 number 61, NIV bible John 14:6, I’ve made another fatwa commandments for god my father’s earth of olam ha-ba messianic kingdom tanakh Daniel 2:44. All heterosexuals, homosexuals, transgender people, little people, all 100% equal in laws and marriage to their creator (god). All men and women are 100% equal in god my father’s scriptures and commandments to teach the earth ( prophetess Miriam Torah 15:20-21. All skin colors are all 100% equal in laws and marriage all baptized and all non baptized, all uncircumcised circumcised included. Absolutely no capital punishment no flogging no stoning to death No torture of any human being or animal sacrifice to God my father. “As I as teacher” gods ONLY commandments Luke 6:37-38, prophet Muhammad holy Quran surah 4 number 122, holy Quran surah 2:43 maximum weight of tzadikah (zakat) of charity. As gods ONLY Chinese sage MO-TI 10 commandments and maximum universal love! Gods 144,000 (returned aymadiyyah souls) at mount Zion singing trisagion song with me Jeshu JAH mashiach (gods ONLY lamb) | mashiach2701’s Blog http://mashiach2701.com/2015/07/19/gods-144000-returned-aymadiyyah-souls-at-mount-zion-singing-trisagion-song-with-me-jeshu-jah-mashiach-gods-only-lamb-at-gods-mount-zion/    (See God my father’s beautiful black (Abrahams) In honor of the Little Black People - Taipei Times http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/feat/archives/2004/11/27/2003212815    little people specifically created by God specifically of his will and plans, holy Quran surah 42 number 49 (as with homosexuals, transgenders and Bangkok Thailand lady boys) if u think this is sick, than CURSE God, its attachments are god’s children, (not any of u as popes kings and priests) u fools, u have no ideas what God my father has created in cosmos as to lifeforms humanoids animals and different ways of procreation!

Israel Ramps Up Punishments For Stone-Throwers As Palestinians Protest

Israel Ramps Up Punishments For Stone-Throwers As Palestinians Protest

  Israel’s parliament has imposed tougher penalties of up to 20 years’ prison for people throwing stones at vehicles and roads, a move one Palestinian official branded racist and excessive. Lawmakers voted 69 to 17 to increase the punishments, approving legislation proposed after a wave of Palestinian protests last year in East Jerusalem. “Tolerance toward terrorists ends today. A stone-thrower…

View On WordPress

Israel Ramps Up Punishments for Stone-Throwers, Palestinians Protest

Reuters, July 21, 2015

JERUSALEM–Israel’s parliament imposed tougher penalties of up to 20 years prison for people throwing stones at vehicles and roads, a move one Palestinian official branded racist and excessive.

Lawmakers voted 69 to 17 to increase the punishments late on Monday, approving legislation proposed after a wave of Palestinian protests last year in East Jerusalem.

“Tolerance toward terrorists ends today. A stone-thrower is a terrorist and only a fitting punishment can serve as a deterrent and just punishment,” Israel’s Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked, of the far-right Jewish Home party, said in a statement.

Confrontations between Palestinian youths and Israeli police routinely degenerate into violent clashes, and stone-throwing has been a symbol of Palestinian resistance since the first Palestinian uprising, or Intifada, against Israel in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

Since 2011 three Israelis, including a baby and a girl, have been killed in the occupied West Bank after rocks were thrown at vehicles they were in.

Human rights groups have criticised Israel for using excessive force including live fire in suppressing Palestinian demonstrations, causing dozens of deaths and hundreds of injuries.

The new law allows for a sentence of up to 20 years in jail for throwing a rock at a vehicle with the intent of causing bodily harm and 10 years in prison if intent was not proven.

Prosecutors in such cases have usually sought sentences of no more than three months in jail when the offence does not result in serious injury.

Qadura Fares, head of the Palestinian Prisoner Club, an organisation that advocates on behalf of Palestinian prisoners in Israeli jails, said the new law was “racist”.

“This law is hateful and contradicts the most basic rule that the punishment fit the offence,” he said.

The law would cover territory including East Jerusalem, but not the occupied West Bank, most of which is under the jurisdiction of the Israeli military.

Israel hands down about 1,000 indictments a year for rock-throwing, according to the Israeli Knesset.

Israel ramps up punishments for stone-throwers, Palestinians protest

JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Israel’s parliament imposed tougher penalties of up to 20 years prison for people throwing stones at vehicles and roads, a move one Palestinian official branded racist and excessive.
http://dlvr.it/BbLg45

Israel ramps up punishments for stone-throwers, Palestinians protest

JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Israel’s parliament imposed tougher penalties of up to 20 years prison for people throwing stones at vehicles and roads, a move one Palestinian official branded racist and excessive.
Lawmakers voted 69 to 17 to increase the punishments late on Monday, approving legislation proposed after a wave of Palestinian protests last year in East Jerusalem.
“Tolerance toward terrorists ends today. A stone-thrower is a terrorist and only a fitting punishment can serve as a deterrent and just punishment,” Israel’s Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked, of the far-right Jewish Home party, said in a statement.
Confrontations between Palestinian youths and Israeli police routinely degenerate into violent clashes, and stone-throwing has been a symbol of Palestinian resistance since the first Palestinian uprising, or Intifada, against Israel in the late 1980s and early 1990s.
Since 2011 three Israelis, including a baby and a girl, have been killed in the occupied West Bank after rocks were thrown at vehicles they were in.
Human rights groups have criticised Israel for using excessive force including live fire in suppressing Palestinian demonstrations, causing dozens of deaths and hundreds of injuries.
The new law allows for a sentence of up to 20 years in jail for throwing a rock at a vehicle with the intent of causing bodily harm and 10 years in prison if intent was not proven.
Prosecutors in such cases have usually sought sentences of no more than three months in jail when the offence does not result in serious injury.
Qadura Fares, head of the Palestinian Prisoner Club, an organisation that advocates on behalf of Palestinian prisoners in Israeli jails, said the new law was “racist”.
“This law is hateful and contradicts the most basic rule that the punishment fit the offence,” he said.
The law would cover territory including East Jerusalem, but not the occupied West Bank, most of which is under the jurisdiction of the Israeli military.
Israel hands down about 1,000 indictments a year for rock-throwing, according to the Israeli Knesset.
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s right-wing government faced growing calls to take action after the Palestinian protests in 2014 over the Gaza war and the burning alive of a Palestinian teenager in a suspected revenge attack for the killing of three Israeli teens by Palestinian militants.
During the protests, stones were regularly thrown at the city’s light railway.
The new legislation was originally promoted by Shaked’s predecessor, centrist Tzipi Livni.
The Palestinians seek a state in East Jerusalem, the West Bank and Gaza Strip. U.S.-brokered peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians broke down in 2014.

(Additional reporting by Ali Sawafta in Ramallah; Writing by Maayan Lubell; Editing by Luke Baker and Andrew Heavens)

Israel ramps up punishments for stone-throwers, Palestinians protest

JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Israel’s parliament imposed tougher penalties of up to 20 years prison for people throwing stones at vehicles and roads, a move one Palestinian official branded racist and excessive.
Lawmakers voted 69 to 17 to increase the punishments late on Monday, approving legislation proposed after a wave of Palestinian protests last year in East Jerusalem.
“Tolerance toward terrorists ends today. A stone-thrower is a terrorist and only a fitting punishment can serve as a deterrent and just punishment,” Israel’s Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked, of the far-right Jewish Home party, said in a statement.
Confrontations between Palestinian youths and Israeli police routinely degenerate into violent clashes, and stone-throwing has been a symbol of Palestinian resistance since the first Palestinian uprising, or Intifada, against Israel in the late 1980s and early 1990s.
Since 2011 three Israelis, including a baby and a girl, have been killed in the occupied West Bank after rocks were thrown at vehicles they were in.
Human rights groups have criticized Israel for using excessive force including live fire in suppressing Palestinian demonstrations, causing dozens of deaths and hundreds of injuries.
The new law allows for a sentence of up to 20 years in jail for throwing a rock at a vehicle with the intent of causing bodily harm and 10 years in prison if intent was not proven.
Prosecutors in such cases have usually sought sentences of no more than three months in jail when the offense does not result in serious injury.
Qadura Fares, head of the Palestinian Prisoner Club, an organization that advocates on behalf of Palestinian prisoners in Israeli jails, said the new law was “racist”.
“This law is hateful and contradicts the most basic rule that the punishment fit the offense,” he said.
The law would cover territory including East Jerusalem, but not the occupied West Bank, most of which is under the jurisdiction of the Israeli military.
Israel hands down about 1,000 indictments a year for rock-throwing, according to the Israeli Knesset.
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s right-wing government faced growing calls to take action after the Palestinian protests in 2014 over the Gaza war and the burning alive of a Palestinian teenager in a suspected revenge attack for the killing of three Israeli teens by Palestinian militants.
During the protests, stones were regularly thrown at the city’s light railway.
The new legislation was originally promoted by Shaked’s predecessor, centrist Tzipi Livni.
The Palestinians seek a state in East Jerusalem, the West Bank and Gaza Strip. U.S.-brokered peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians broke down in 2014.

(Additional reporting by Ali Sawafta in Ramallah; Writing by Maayan Lubell; Editing by Luke Baker and Andrew Heavens)

Intro

Death is inevitable; it comes and takes those away that we love,

And all we can do is watch, and hop that we aren’t next.

But what happens when you must die to do what’s right?

We must always remember that death is not a punishment,

But a stepping stone in our lives.

It takes us away from those we love,

To show us the next stage in our never-ending adventure

Remember, death is only the beginning.

-Faith

Israel ramps up punishments for stone-throwers, Palestinians protest

JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Israel’s parliament imposed tougher penalties of up to 20 years prison for people throwing stones at vehicles and roads, a move one Palestinian official branded racist and excessive.
Lawmakers voted 69 to 17 to increase the punishments late on Monday, approving legislation proposed after a wave of Palestinian protests last year in East Jerusalem.
“Tolerance toward terrorists ends today. A stone-thrower is a terrorist and only a fitting punishment can serve as a deterrent and just punishment,” Israel’s Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked, of the far-right Jewish Home party, said in a statement.
Confrontations between Palestinian youths and Israeli police routinely degenerate into violent clashes, and stone-throwing has been a symbol of Palestinian resistance since the first Palestinian uprising, or Intifada, against Israel in the late 1980s and early 1990s.
Since 2011 three Israelis, including a baby and a girl, have been killed in the occupied West Bank after rocks were thrown at vehicles they were in.
Human rights groups have criticized Israel for using excessive force including live fire in suppressing Palestinian demonstrations, causing dozens of deaths and hundreds of injuries.
The new law allows for a sentence of up to 20 years in jail for throwing a rock at a vehicle with the intent of causing bodily harm and 10 years in prison if intent was not proven.
Prosecutors in such cases have usually sought sentences of no more than three months in jail when the offense does not result in serious injury.
Qadura Fares, head of the Palestinian Prisoner Club, an organization that advocates on behalf of Palestinian prisoners in Israeli jails, said the new law was “racist”.
“This law is hateful and contradicts the most basic rule that the punishment fit the offense,” he said.
The law would cover territory including East Jerusalem, but not the occupied West Bank, most of which is under the jurisdiction of the Israeli military.
Israel hands down about 1,000 indictments a year for rock-throwing, according to the Israeli Knesset.
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s right-wing government faced growing calls to take action after the Palestinian protests in 2014 over the Gaza war and the burning alive of a Palestinian teenager in a suspected revenge attack for the killing of three Israeli teens by Palestinian militants.
During the protests, stones were regularly thrown at the city’s light railway.
The new legislation was originally promoted by Shaked’s predecessor, centrist Tzipi Livni.
The Palestinians seek a state in East Jerusalem, the West Bank and Gaza Strip. U.S.-brokered peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians broke down in 2014.

(Additional reporting by Ali Sawafta in Ramallah; Writing by Maayan Lubell; Editing by Luke Baker and Andrew Heavens)