pump-audio

SO NEWS CAME OUT THAT MY BABY SHIKADAI WILL BE FIGHTING THE BURRITO. 

Imagine Gaara and Naruto having their own little competition up in the Kage seats because lmao 

“My son is going to kick ass” 

“If he’s anything like you were, then he’s no match for my nephew”

“OH HAHA DO YOU REMEMBER WHEN I KICKED YOUR ASS AFTER YOU TRIED TO DESTROY MY VILLAGE.”

“That is different story.”

youtube

Y’ALL HEARD THIS SONG FROM THE GAME RIP?!?,,,, BC IF YOU DIDN’T YOU NEED TO

Hear better, see better and feel better with these three gadgets

Hear better, see better and feel better with these three gadgets #fashion #health #music

PUMP AUDIO


You want to listen to tunes while you exercise, but you don’t want to compromise your audio. It’s typically been a tradeoff until now.  After coming off a successful Kickstarter campaign, Pump Headphones are the new standard to meet or beat.  In fact, in a blind listening test, supposedly 74% of people preferred Pump to Beats Tours.

I’ve been using them for a few weeks now and I…

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The Ettes

If you’ve ever done any video production work for MTV then you’ll know all about Pump Audio music. It’s basically a hard drive with about 700 gigs of generic background music, by studio hacks, in every possible genre and style. The whole point is that it’s license-free music to fill up silence. That’s it. It’s made to be bland and unassuming, and if you work in TV long enough it gets to the point that you’ll start recognizing Pump Audio songs in online/TV shows, commercials, etc. I swear I was watching a Taco Bell commercial once and I was like “oooh they’re using Trippin (Medium Mix) by Brian Shaw… I hope the PA for this commercial did his cue sheets cuz if he didn’t that’s a few thousand bucks the Shaw-man ain’t gettin y’heard!”

Something TRAGIC about Pump Audio:
A lot of new Pump Audio tracks are blatant rip-offs of popular hip-hop instrumentals, obviously because if you want the new Game song playing in the background while your VJ tells the audience to log on to mtv.clusterfuck.com, then you’re going to have to pay a bunch of money for it. So basically they have these dudes sitting around listening to the shitty new Game instrumental, and then they sit down and record an even shittier, more generic version of it.

Something KIND OF FUNNY about Pump Audio:
I think there’s actually a bunch of established musicians who were at one point or still do write music specifically for Pump. Actually I’m not sure if this is TRAGIC or KIND OF FUNNY I guess they’re both sort of interchangeable when the final product is intended to be mediocre. Anyways I remember once I saw that we used a song in this show that was written by none other than Chris Ballew (the lead guy from Presidents of the USA).

The alternatives to using Pump are no better. You can either use shittier Pump knock-offs (basically a more watered down version of an already watered down music library) such as Master Source or Extreme, or you can look at MTV’s “Selects List.”

The Selects list is a list of music from established artists that it’s free to use. The list is also woefully out of date and subject to whatever label MTV has signed a deal with at that moment, so you’ll see things like every song by Sting, Anthrax, and Better Than Ezra (surprisingly there’s quite a few) but almost zero songs from the last 5 years.

Anyways to try to have non-shitty music in the background of any MTV show is basically an impossibility. However, I found one! They used this in an episode of the current Real World/Road Rules challenge (and also in an episode of Living Lohan). When I heard it I was like “hey this is good!” I’m aware that I am openly admitting that MTV turned me on to this, which is lame, but not as lame as the fact that probably this is some internet/Brooklyn darling buzz band that ‘Sup magazine has already interviewed like 7 months ago.

The Ettes ~ You Can’t Do That To Me

youtube

fUUUUUUUCK YEEEEEAHH

buying guide: Best headphones: which set should you buy?

Best headphones: which set should you buy?

To get the most out of your smartphone or music player, you have to buy a respectable set of headphones. There’s no getting around it. The dinky throwaways that are included with today’s most popular devices just don’t cut the mustard.

But when it comes to making a selection, it’s all too easy to get overwhelmed by the sheer amount of options to choose from. That’s why we’ve covered the ins and outs for you.

Take a look at the different types of headphones available to decide which style is right for your listening needs and your budget.

In-ear headphones

This type of headphone, more commonly referred to as an earbud or earphone, is the cheapest and easiest way to pump audio into your ears. If you’ve purchased an MP3 player, or more recently, a smartphone, it’s likely that a set was included with the purchase.

Earphones rest in or just outside the ear canal, creating a tight seal to keep air out and sound in. Compared to other types of headphones, these are the most discreet ones you’ll find. Their small form-factor also makes them the king/queen of portability.

You’re not likely to find strong performers at the low-end of the price spectrum. Their sound delivery is generally muddled, lacking bass and overcompensating for that with harsh mids and highs. That said, it won’t cost you much money at all to find a value-packed option complete with inline controls and a microphone.

Moving up in price, the selection of quality options vastly increases. For example, you can nab yourself the stellar Sennheiser Momentum In-Ear (pictured above) for under $100, or £90. These in-ear headphones not only look the part, (seriously, they’re fresh) but also offer everything you need to have a fantastic experience listening to whatever it is you listen to. A comfortable fit, excellent noise isolation and powerful drivers help to ensure that. It’s an unbeatable value.

Over-ear headphones

This ear-muff style of headphone generally provides greater richness and depth of sound, which allows listeners to pick apart the instruments and sounds with ease. Additionally, over-ear, or circum-aural headphones, go around the ear and as such, offer tons of comfort.

The price range for a set of on-ear headphones begins around $100 and the sky’s the limit. For example, the Oppo PM-1, while excellent, are priced exorbitantly at $1,099. It’s definitely not necessary to spend that much. That said, you get what you pay for.

If your headphone budget is in the $2-300, you’ll start getting into options that have excellent build quality, premium materials and amazing sound and sometimes, features like ANC (active noise cancellation.)

The Beyerdynamic Custom One Pro Plus (pictured above) offers plenty of comfort and spacious, powerful sound performance. These over-ear headphones run for $229 (£179, about AU$299) and they’re worth it thanks to a few features that set them apart: the bass response switch and customizable covers. Tweak the style and the amount of bass in your music to your preferred taste with these unique headphones.

Wireless headphones

This style of headphone doesn’t limit you to a specific form factor. In fact, you can find in-ear, on-ear and over-ear headphone styles sans wire.

Opting to go wireless will cost you a premium of anywhere between $50-100. Going futuristic isn’t cheap. One important thing to consider is that your music device supports the Bluetooth wireless protocol, which is required to use this type of headphone.

Speaking of Bluetooth, it has become exponentially more reliable over time, but it’s always susceptible to disturbances in the force. In short, any little thing, from the understandable (conflicting Wi-Fi signals, microwaves, cordless telephones), to the absurd (sticking a hand in the space between the device and the headphones) can sometimes interrupt a wireless listening experience.

Our roundup of best wireless headphones is full of amazing contenders, but the Jabra Move Wireless (pictured above) are the ones to beat in terms to value. The build quality, performance and style provide more than enough reason to choose these, but if you aren’t convinced, maybe the price will win you over. You can grab these for the low price of $99 (£79, AU$126).

Noise-cancelling headphones

This category, much like wireless headphones, isn’t limited to a form factor. You can find this clever mix of technologies integrated into the ear pieces of in-ear and over-ear headphones alike.

Many companies falsely claim to offer true noise cancellation with just the padding included around the ear cups. Don’t believe it. This is PNC (passive noise cancellation), and it doesn’t amount to much. You can even replicate this effect by cupping your hands around your ears, so why shell out the big bucks for it?

On the other hand, ANC (active noise cancellation) is the real deal. This technique involves an external microphone that detects the noise outside. Once it has an idea of the incoming decibel level, the headphone speakers inside transmit a noise to cancel it out. With ANC activated, it’s like being in your own personal concentration bubble.

The Philips Fidelio NC1 (pictured above) offer the best bang-for-your-buck for noise-cancelling headphones. These on-ear headphones offer a light, comfortable fit that don’t clamp down over your ears. The design is elegant and you’re not likely to find another set of noise-cancelling headphones that are so compact. Additionally, the noise cancellation effect is powerful and can run up to 30 hours before its internal, rechargeable battery needs another charge. At $300, (£250) these aren’t cheap, but the performance and overall presentation makes the NC1 a worth purchase.

We’re constantly reviewing new headphones, but let us know if there is a set that you’d like us to take a look at in the comments.








buying guide: Best headphones: which set should you buy?

Best headphones: which set should you buy?

To get the most out of your smartphone or music player, you have to buy a respectable set of headphones. There’s no getting around it. The dinky throwaways that are included with today’s most popular devices just don’t cut the mustard.

But when it comes to making a selection, it’s all too easy to get overwhelmed by the sheer amount of options to choose from. That’s why we’ve covered the ins and outs for you.

Take a look at the different types of headphones available to decide which style is right for your listening needs and your budget.

In-ear headphones

This type of headphone, more commonly referred to as an earbud or earphone, is the cheapest and easiest way to pump audio into your ears. If you’ve purchased an MP3 player, or more recently, a smartphone, it’s likely that a set was included with the purchase.

Earphones rest in or just outside the ear canal, creating a tight seal to keep air out and sound in. Compared to other types of headphones, these are the most discreet ones you’ll find. Their small form-factor also makes them the king/queen of portability.

You’re not likely to find strong performers at the low-end of the price spectrum. Their sound delivery is generally muddled, lacking bass and overcompensating for that with harsh mids and highs. That said, it won’t cost you much money at all to find a value-packed option complete with inline controls and a microphone.

Moving up in price, the selection of quality options vastly increases. For example, you can nab yourself the stellar Sennheiser Momentum In-Ear (pictured above) for under $100, or £90. These in-ear headphones not only look the part, (seriously, they’re fresh) but also offer everything you need to have a fantastic experience listening to whatever it is you listen to. A comfortable fit, excellent noise isolation and powerful drivers help to ensure that. It’s an unbeatable value.

Over-ear headphones

This ear-muff style of headphone generally provides greater richness and depth of sound, which allows listeners to pick apart the instruments and sounds with ease. Additionally, over-ear, or circum-aural headphones, go around the ear and as such, offer tons of comfort.

The price range for a set of on-ear headphones begins around $100 and the sky’s the limit. For example, the Oppo PM-1, while excellent, are priced exorbitantly at $1,099. It’s definitely not necessary to spend that much. That said, you get what you pay for.

If your headphone budget is in the $2-300, you’ll start getting into options that have excellent build quality, premium materials and amazing sound and sometimes, features like ANC (active noise cancellation.)

The Beyerdynamic Custom One Pro Plus (pictured above) offers plenty of comfort and spacious, powerful sound performance. These over-ear headphones run for $229 (£179, about AU$299) and they’re worth it thanks to a few features that set them apart: the bass response switch and customizable covers. Tweak the style and the amount of bass in your music to your preferred taste with these unique headphones.

Wireless headphones

This style of headphone doesn’t limit you to a specific form factor. In fact, you can find in-ear, on-ear and over-ear headphone styles sans wire.

Opting to go wireless will cost you a premium of anywhere between $50-100. Going futuristic isn’t cheap. One important thing to consider is that your music device supports the Bluetooth wireless protocol, which is required to use this type of headphone.

Speaking of Bluetooth, it has become exponentially more reliable over time, but it’s always susceptible to disturbances in the force. In short, any little thing, from the understandable (conflicting Wi-Fi signals, microwaves, cordless telephones), to the absurd (sticking a hand in the space between the device and the headphones) can sometimes interrupt a wireless listening experience.

Our roundup of best wireless headphones is full of amazing contenders, but the Jabra Move Wireless (pictured above) are the ones to beat in terms to value. The build quality, performance and style provide more than enough reason to choose these, but if you aren’t convinced, maybe the price will win you over. You can grab these for the low price of $99 (£79, AU$126).

Noise-cancelling headphones

This category, much like wireless headphones, isn’t limited to a form factor. You can find this clever mix of technologies integrated into the ear pieces of in-ear and over-ear headphones alike.

Many companies falsely claim to offer true noise cancellation with just the padding included around the ear cups. Don’t believe it. This is PNC (passive noise cancellation), and it doesn’t amount to much. You can even replicate this effect by cupping your hands around your ears, so why shell out the big bucks for it?

On the other hand, ANC (active noise cancellation) is the real deal. This technique involves an external microphone that detects the noise outside. Once it has an idea of the incoming decibel level, the headphone speakers inside transmit a noise to cancel it out. With ANC activated, it’s like being in your own personal concentration bubble.

The Philips Fidelio NC1 (pictured above) offer the best bang-for-your-buck for noise-cancelling headphones. These on-ear headphones offer a light, comfortable fit that don’t clamp down over your ears. The design is elegant and you’re not likely to find another set of noise-cancelling headphones that are so compact. Additionally, the noise cancellation effect is powerful and can run up to 30 hours before its internal, rechargeable battery needs another charge. At $300, (£250) these aren’t cheap, but the performance and overall presentation makes the NC1 a worth purchase.

We’re constantly reviewing new headphones, but let us know if there is a set that you’d like us to take a look at in the comments.








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buying guide: Best headphones: which set should you buy?

Best headphones: which set should you buy?

To get the most out of your smartphone or music player, you have to buy a respectable set of headphones. There’s no getting around it. The dinky throwaways that are included with today’s most popular devices just don’t cut the mustard.

But when it comes to making a selection, it’s all too easy to get overwhelmed by the sheer amount of options to choose from. That’s why we’ve covered the ins and outs for you.

Take a look at the different types of headphones available to decide which style is right for your listening needs and your budget.

In-ear headphones

This type of headphone, more commonly referred to as an earbud or earphone, is the cheapest and easiest way to pump audio into your ears. If you’ve purchased an MP3 player, or more recently, a smartphone, it’s likely that a set was included with the purchase.

Earphones rest in or just outside the ear canal, creating a tight seal to keep air out and sound in. Compared to other types of headphones, these are the most discreet ones you’ll find. Their small form-factor also makes them the king/queen of portability.

You’re not likely to find strong performers at the low-end of the price spectrum. Their sound delivery is generally muddled, lacking bass and overcompensating for that with harsh mids and highs. That said, it won’t cost you much money at all to find a value-packed option complete with inline controls and a microphone.

Moving up in price, the selection of quality options vastly increases. For example, you can nab yourself the stellar Sennheiser Momentum In-Ear (pictured above) for under $100, or £90. These in-ear headphones not only look the part, (seriously, they’re fresh) but also offer everything you need to have a fantastic experience listening to whatever it is you listen to. A comfortable fit, excellent noise isolation and powerful drivers help to ensure that. It’s an unbeatable value.

Over-ear headphones

This ear-muff style of headphone generally provides greater richness and depth of sound, which allows listeners to pick apart the instruments and sounds with ease. Additionally, over-ear, or circum-aural headphones, go around the ear and as such, offer tons of comfort.

The price range for a set of on-ear headphones begins around $100 and the sky’s the limit. For example, the Oppo PM-1, while excellent, are priced exorbitantly at $1,099. It’s definitely not necessary to spend that much. That said, you get what you pay for.

If your headphone budget is in the $2-300, you’ll start getting into options that have excellent build quality, premium materials and amazing sound and sometimes, features like ANC (active noise cancellation.)

The Beyerdynamic Custom One Pro Plus (pictured above) offers plenty of comfort and spacious, powerful sound performance. These over-ear headphones run for $229 (£179, about AU$299) and they’re worth it thanks to a few features that set them apart: the bass response switch and customizable covers. Tweak the style and the amount of bass in your music to your preferred taste with these unique headphones.

Wireless headphones

This style of headphone doesn’t limit you to a specific form factor. In fact, you can find in-ear, on-ear and over-ear headphone styles sans wire.

Opting to go wireless will cost you a premium of anywhere between $50-100. Going futuristic isn’t cheap. One important thing to consider is that your music device supports the Bluetooth wireless protocol, which is required to use this type of headphone.

Speaking of Bluetooth, it has become exponentially more reliable over time, but it’s always susceptible to disturbances in the force. In short, any little thing, from the understandable (conflicting Wi-Fi signals, microwaves, cordless telephones), to the absurd (sticking a hand in the space between the device and the headphones) can sometimes interrupt a wireless listening experience.

Our roundup of best wireless headphones is full of amazing contenders, but the Jabra Move Wireless (pictured above) are the ones to beat in terms to value. The build quality, performance and style provide more than enough reason to choose these, but if you aren’t convinced, maybe the price will win you over. You can grab these for the low price of $99 (£79, AU$126).

Noise-cancelling headphones

This category, much like wireless headphones, isn’t limited to a form factor. You can find this clever mix of technologies integrated into the ear pieces of in-ear and over-ear headphones alike.

Many companies falsely claim to offer true noise cancellation with just the padding included around the ear cups. Don’t believe it. This is PNC (passive noise cancellation), and it doesn’t amount to much. You can even replicate this effect by cupping your hands around your ears, so why shell out the big bucks for it?

On the other hand, ANC (active noise cancellation) is the real deal. This technique involves an external microphone that detects the noise outside. Once it has an idea of the incoming decibel level, the headphone speakers inside transmit a noise to cancel it out. With ANC activated, it’s like being in your own personal concentration bubble.

The Philips Fidelio NC1 (pictured above) offer the best bang-for-your-buck for noise-cancelling headphones. These on-ear headphones offer a light, comfortable fit that don’t clamp down over your ears. The design is elegant and you’re not likely to find another set of noise-cancelling headphones that are so compact. Additionally, the noise cancellation effect is powerful and can run up to 30 hours before its internal, rechargeable battery needs another charge. At $300, (£250) these aren’t cheap, but the performance and overall presentation makes the NC1 a worth purchase.

We’re constantly reviewing new headphones, but let us know if there is a set that you’d like us to take a look at in the comments.



Written by Cameron Faulkner from TechRadar on June 23, 2015 at 12:20PM