pucker factor

Rules For A Gunfight by Drill Instructor Joe B. Fricks, USMC

1. Forget about knives, bats and fists. Bring a gun. Preferably, bring at least two guns. Bring all of your friends who have guns. Bring four times the ammunition you think you could ever need.

2. Anything worth shooting is worth shooting twice. Ammunition is cheap – life is expensive. If you shoot inside, buckshot is your friend. A new wall is cheap – funerals are expensive.

3. Only hits count. The only thing worse than a miss is a slow miss.

4. If your shooting stance is good, you’re probably not moving fast enough or using cover correctly.

5. Move away from your attacker and go to cover. Distance is your friend. (Bulletproof cover and diagonal or lateral movement are preferred.)

6. If you can choose what to bring to a gunfight, bring a semi or full-automatic long gun and a friend with a long gun.

7. In ten years nobody will remember the details of caliber, stance, or tactics. They will only remember who lived.

8. If you are not shooting, you should be communicating, reloading, and running. Yell “Fire!” Why “Fire”? Cops will come with the Fire Department, sirens often scare off the bad guys, or at least cause then to lose concentration and will…. and who is going to summon help if you yell ”Intruder,” “Glock” or “Winchester?”

9. Accuracy is relative: most combat shooting standards will be more dependent on “pucker factor” than the inherent accuracy of the gun.

10. Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to beat you to death with it because it is empty.

11. Always cheat, always win. The only unfair fight is the one you lose.

12. Have a plan.

13. Have a back-up plan, because the first one won’t work. “No battle plan ever survives 10 seconds past first contact with an enemy.”

14. Use cover or concealment as much as possible, but remember, sheetrock walls and the like stop nothing but your pulse when bullets tear through them.

15. Flank your adversary when possible. Protect yours.

16. Don’t drop your guard.

17. Always tactical load and threat scan 360 degrees. Practice reloading one-handed and off-hand shooting. That’s how you live if hit in your “good” side.

18. Watch their hands. Hands kill. Smiles, frowns and other facial expressions don’t (In God we trust. Everyone else keep your hands where I can see them.)

19. Decide NOW to always be aggressive ENOUGH, quickly ENOUGH.

20. The faster you finish the fight, the less shot you will get.

21. Be polite. Be professional. But, have a plan to kill everyone you meet if necessary, because they may want to kill you.

22. Be courteous to everyone, overly friendly to no one.

23. Your number one option for personal security is a lifelong commitment to avoidance, deterrence, and de-escalation.

24. Do not attend a gunfight with a handgun, the caliber of which does not start with anything smaller than ”4″.

25. Use a gun that works EVERY TIME. “All skill is in vain when an Angel blows the powder from the flintlock of your musket.” At a practice session, throw your gun into the mud, then make sure it still works. You can clean it later.

26. Practice shooting in the dark, with someone shouting at you, when out of breath, etc.

27. Regardless of whether justified or not, you will feel sad about killing another human being. It is better to be sad than to be room temperature.

28. The only thing you EVER say afterwards is, “He said he was going to kill me. I believed him. I’m sorry, Officer, but I’m very upset now. I can’t say anything more. Please speak with my attorney.”

Finally, Drill Instructor Frick’s Rules For Un-armed Combat.

1: Never be unarmed.

anonymous asked:

What can you tell me about different types of fear responses like on a physical level? Is that related to "going into shock"? Also this kinda blurs the lines of your jurisdiction, so if you can't really answer I totally get it. Thanks so much for everything you do!!!!!!!!!

Hey there nonny! Actually, physiology of the adrenaline response is exactly my jurisdiction :) You asked for a “physical level”, so I’m going to talk physiology, not psychology. 

Physiologically, what’s going to happen is that your character’s body is going to release a bunch of neurotransmitters and hormones, primarily epinephrine (AKA adrenaline). Adrenaline has a number of physiological effects: 

  • Increased heart rate and blood pressure
  • Increased respiratory rate
  • Fear and panic (when induced by fear) 
  • Dilated pupils 
  • Sweating and a feeling of being hot all over 
  • Increased blood flow to muscles; decreased blood flow to organs 
    • Nausea, vomiting 
    • “Pucker factor” – increased rectal tone. Yes, really. 
  • Tunnel vision
  • Fine motor control is difficult or lost entirely 
  • Decreased sensation of pain

People get stronger, feel less pain, and can think less clearly under the effects of an adrenaline surge, aka adrenaline rush, aka sympathetic surge, aka catecholamine dump. 

The correlation between the fear response and a character entering shock – actual, medical shock, ie systemic hypoperfusion, or not enough blood flow getting  where it needs to be – is that adrenaline is the body’s first line of defense against the effects of shock. Adrenaline tightens up the blood vessels, which increases blood pressure (can normalize it if it’s low). Adrenaline also helps us get out of lethal situations – or at least, it helped our ancestors do that. 

What’s useful to understand about the relationship between adrenaline and shock is that if shock is the problem, adrenaline is the solution

However, this amazing superpower humans have comes at a cost. Afterward, we get exhausted. We also can’t think as clearly or make rational decisions during these episodes. 

For a surprisingly good guide to adrenaline response from a blog I don’t necessarily recommend in general, check out [this article from the Art of Manliness]. The research about this is mainly based on soldiers in combat, but it gets discussed actually a lot in the medical sphere, because when a patient is shitting the bed in front of you, you need to know how to remain calm. 

Hope this helped! 

xoxo, Aunt Scripty

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Accuracy is relative: most combat shooting standards will be more dependent on “pucker factor” than the inherent accuracy of the gun.
— 

Joe B. Fricks, USMC Drill Instructor

Drill Instructor Frick’s Rules For Un-armed Combat.

Rules of Combat

Rules of Combat

Rules of Combat

USMC

  1. Bring a weapon. Preferably, bring at least two. Bring all of your friends who have weapons. Bring their friends who have weapons.
  2. Anything worth shooting is worth shooting twice. Ammo is cheap. Life is expensive.
  3. Only hits count. Close doesn’t count. The only thing worse than a miss is a slow miss.
  4. If your shooting stance is good, you’re probably not moving fast enough, nor using cover correctly.
  5. Move away from your attacker. Distance is your friend. (Lateral and diagonal movement are preferred.)
  6. If you can choose what to bring to a gunfight, bring a big weapon and a friend with a big weapon.
  7. In ten years nobody will remember the details of caliber, stance, or tactics. They will only remember who lived and who didn’t.
  8. If you are not shooting, you should be communicating, reloading, and running.
  9. Accuracy is relative: most combat shooting is more dependent on “pucker factor” than the inherent accuracy of the weapon.
  10. Use a weaponthat works EVERY TIME. “All skill is in vain when an Angel pisses in the flintlock of your musket.”
  11. Someday someone may kill you with your own weapon, but they should have to beat you to death with it because it is empty.
  12. In combat, there are no rules, always cheat; always win. The only unfair fight is the one you lose.
  13. Have a plan.
  14. Have a back-up plan, because the first one won’t work.
  15. Use cover or concealment as much as possible. The visible target should be in FRONT of YOUR weapon.
  16. Flank your adversary when possible. Protect yours.
  17. Don’t drop your guard.
  18. Always tactical load and threat scan 360 degrees.
  19. Watch their hands. Hands kill. (In God we trust. Everyone else, keep your hands where I can see them).
  20. Decide to be aggressive ENOUGH, quickly ENOUGH.
  21. The faster you finish the fight, the less shot you will get.
  22. Be courteous to everyone, friendly to no one.
  23. Be polite. Be professional. But have a plan to kill everyone you meet.
  24. Your number one Option for Personal Security is a lifelong commitment to avoidance, deterrence, and de-escalation.
  25. Do not attend a gunfight with a handgun, the caliber of which does not start with a “.4.”

Army

  1. See USMC Rules for combat
  2. Add 60 to 90 days
  3. Hope the Marines already destroyed all meaningful resistance

Navy

  1. Spend three weeks getting somewhere
  2. Adopt an aggressive offshore posture
  3. Send in the Marines
  4. Drink Coffee
  5. Bring back the Marines

Air Force

  1. Kiss the spouse good-bye
  2. Drive to the flight line
  3. Fly to target area, drop bombs, fly back.
  4. Pop in at the club for a couple with the guys
  5. Go home, BBQ some burgers and drink some more beer
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29. Jänner Rallye 2012 Mitterlehner SP1 - dreher / 5. beste Zeit auf dieser SP (by scharti1984)

Holy cow! Sometimes I forget what risky hobby I have.