publishers

Dear Publishers

I love buying your books but PLEASE DON’T

  • change the covers halfway through a series, could you at least wait until the series is over and then re-print? Or print the old versions as well?
  • change the size of the paperbacks halfway through a series, now my bookshelf is messed up thanks
  • if people aren’t complaining about the covers they are probably fine, don’t change them 

Please DO:

  • Put the number on the front of books and the spines so I know what order the series is in when I’m in a bookshop
  • sell series in sets for a discounted price
  • talk to the readers more about what they like regarding cover designs
  • add illustrations to the inside cover pages, I love illustrations
  • Spines in a series that make a rainbow, my heart
  • COVERS THAT COME TOGETHER TO MAKE A BIG PICTURE
Books in Brazil can be used to ride the Subway for free

One of the largest publishers in Brazil is expanding their Ticket Books program, where books can be used to ride the subway for free. Each title has an RFID card embedded in the back cover that comes loaded with enough credit for 10 rides, which means that reader can simply scan their books at the turnstyle just like a normal subway pass. When the book runs out of trips, it can be recharged online.

The Ticket Books collection included ten titles: Peanuts: Friendship. That’s What Friends Are For by Charles M. Schulz, Garfield: Sorry by Jim Davis, Hundred Love Sonnets by Pablo Neruda, The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Art of War by Sun Tzu, Sherlock Holmes: The Hound of Baskerville by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Hamlet by William Shakespeare, Murder Alley by Agatha Christie, Chives In Trouble! by Mauricio de Sousa, and Quintana Pocket by Mario Quintana. The books also featured cover art inspired by subway maps.

Things I want in more books
  • illustrations on the inside pages. you know how you open The Wrath and the Dawn and there’s the beautiful picture of Shahrzad? MORE OF THOSE
    • i want this to be a normal thing in hardcovers
    • go big or go home. have a full page illustration of the opening scene
    • wouldn’t that be awesome
  • for heaven’s sake make sure there’s a blurb on the paperbacks. because sometimes there’s just quotes from reviews and other authors and that’s ridiculous
  • less describing female characters in terms of their attractiveness. if you don’t introduce every male character like that don’t do it for the girls. this pisses me off.
  • more books without romance
  • make it easier to get signed books! not everyone can get to book signings. please i’m jealous
  • more books where the spines do pretty things like make a rainbow or a picture or a face or just somehow go together really nicely
    • in the same vein, more authors whose books match. you know how all rainbow rowell books are like pastel-ish and look hand drawn? like the books themselves don’t match but the author has a general aesthetic
  • i thought i had more of these i’m gonna have to add to this
Punctuation in novels

When we think of novels, of newspapers and blogs, we think of words. We easily forget the little suggestions pushed in between: the punctuation. But how can we be so cruel to such a fundamental part of writing?

Inspired by a series of posters, I wondered what did my favorite books look like without words. Can you tell them apart or are they all a-mush? In fact, they can be quite distinct. Take my all-time favorite book, Absalom, Absalom!by William Faulkner. It is dense prose stuffed with parentheticals. When placed next to a novel with more simplified prose — Blood Meridian, by Cormac McCarthy — it is a stark difference (see above).

READ MORE

James Patterson paid for a full-page ad in The New York Times criticizing Amazon, Scott Turow talked about the “nightmarish” future that Amazon will bring and Stephen King signed a petition decrying the Seattle online retailer.

They do this as if they are fighting for the little guy.

They aren’t.

The ‘1 percent’ mega best-selling authors side with giant publishing corporate entities because they make a lot of money from them. The rest of us don’t.

— 

Frank Schaeffer, “The publishers, not Amazon, keep authors down

WOAH, HOLD THE PHONE. I had never even considered this before and it’s an amazing point. Amazon has been made out to be this big evil entity, but we should all remember that it’s Amazon vs. publishers, not Amazon vs. writers!

Wow, I just love reading perspectives like this that totally change my own.

theguardian.com
Stephen King short fiction competition: Send us your stories | Books | The Guardian

The Guardian are teaming up with his UK publisher Hodder & Stoughton to run a short story competition, in which King himself will pick the winner. The prize will include publication of the winning story on the the Guardian books website and a chance to improve your skills at a Guardian Masterclass run by King’s UK editor, Philippa Pride.

Query Letters: When (Not) To Talk About Multiple Books, Including Sequels, A Series, And Other Projects - Writer’s Relief Blog

Often, we at Writer’s Relief read query letters from writers who will mention more than one book. They mention prequels and sequels, previously published books, unpublished books, self-published books, and more. But is it a good idea to mention other book projects in your query letter?

Though every writer’s situation is unique, here are some things you’ll want to take into account before you mention other projects when you are pitching via query letter.

wired.com
Publishers Are Warming to Fan Fiction, But Can It Go Mainstream? | Underwire | Wired.com

Literary publishing’s uneasy relationship with fan fiction has been complicated by the realization that fandom is a huge potential market—one already stocked with both prolific authors and enthusiastic readers.  But how to tap that market is a dilemma that few publishers seem quite prepared to engage.

In which I look at publishing’s love-hate relationship with fan fiction, and how folks like Big Bang Press are challenging and subverting that.

I really, really want to write a crunchy breakdown of how gender relates to both the popular dismissal of fan fiction and Howey’s emergence as the poster child for legitimizing digital publishing, which strikes me as having some uncanny parallels to John Green’s oft-discussed status in YA.

I also worry that a) no one will ever want to publish as many articles as I am dying to write on intersections of fan fiction, gender theory, and new publishing economies; and b) that maybe I actually just want to write a (likewise probably unpublishable) book on this stuff; but that’s neither here nor there.