published in: the telegraph

The Little Green Men

The Little Green Man is 50 years old today!  On this day in 1967 astronomer Jocelyn Burnell Bell found an unusual object blinking in a dark corner of the sky in the constellation Vulpecula. With a period of 1.3373 seconds and a pulse width of 0.04 second it was the first radio pulsar discovered, although Bell and her Ph.D. advisor astronomer Antony Hewish had no idea what exactly they were seeing. Given the regularity of the signal, they briefly (and mostly jokingly) considered the possibility that they had stumbled upon evidence of extra-terrestrial intelligence, and dubbed it LGM1, for Little Green Men 1. According to Bell:

We did not really believe that we had picked up signals from another civilization, but obviously the idea had crossed our minds and we had no proof that it was an entirely natural radio emission. It is an interesting problem - if one thinks one may have detected life elsewhere in the universe how does one announce the results responsibly? Who does one tell first?

Thomas Gold and Franco Pacini suggested that pulsars were in fact pulsating neutron stars, confirmed with the discovery of a second pulsar in the Crab Nebula. The next year in March 1968, The Daily Telegraph was first to publish the new word:

An entirely novel kind of star came to light on Aug. 6 last year and was referred to, by astronomers, as LGM (Little Green Men). Now it is thought to be a novel type between a white dwarf and a neutron [sic]. The name Pulsar is likely to be given to it. Dr. A. Hewish told me yesterday: “… I am sure that today every radio telescope is looking at the Pulsars.”

The word itself was a combination of pulsating and star, a very literal and descriptive explanation of what scientists were seeing. Today that first pulsar is known variously as CP 1919, PSR B1919+21 and PSR J1921+2153.

Pulsars are so unique that NASA used them as intergalactic locators, drawing a map on the Pioneer plaques to allow extra-terrestrial intelligences to find planet Earth.

In 1974 Antony Hewish became the first astronomer to win a Nobel Prize in Physics, with a bit of controversy surrounding the award as Bell (who actually discovered the pulsar) was not co-awarded the prize.

All images used under CC 3.0 license.

the telegraph actually published a “i was being a racist ass, but then i did my research and realized i was wrong” story and y’all only want to get mad over a screenshot of the “i was being a racist ass” part, literally fuck you all, you are what make this work exhausting

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This article from The Telegraph, published October 3rd, 1975, highlights the dangers of setting up a certain kind of hoax. Dressing up like Bigfoot in order to harass your local town may end up badly. Luckily for the youngsters behind this, nothing bad happened. But like the police chief of this town mentioned, “I find it an act of God the boys didn’t get shot. We had people roaming around with guns ready to shoot the monster.”

Emmy Towsey (Taussig) and Evelyn (Irma) Ippen, Bodenwieser Ballet, performing in Centennial Park, Sydney, (c.1939). Photograph by Max Dupain. State Library, New South Wales.

The Daily Telegraph in Sydney published the photo in 1939 to accompany an article about the Bodenwieser dancers’ appearance in a prologue to A Kiss From Kiki at the Minerva Theatre on October 1. In 1941, it appeared in The Home magazine with the text noting that the Bodenwieser Ballet was “a most important force in our national culture.“

JT Anon

wait, so she may be at the screening? so she is so fragile and weak that she can’t read the book or script, else she may fall into fits and the peace in the house will be ruined for ben (because, separation of work and home of course) but she can go to the screening and watch the father of her children search for a child on screen? how is that not more traumatic? i cannot believe we are discussing two adult people like this. i know some people get upset, but jesus christ

its just so weird. she can dress up and pose for cameras, she can use her marriage to promote her work, she can be featured in media and get media mentions off of bens name, but she can’t actually take an interest in the actual art of his work? she can only participate in the media and photo ops, but no work? hmmm

i’ve said it before, ill say it again. you couldn’t pay me millions and millions and millions to be sophie hunter or have anything even mildly resembling her life. my god.

JT

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

JT, as you know my Twitter / Instagram illiteracy is very limiting to my research powers…

Anyway, there’s a bunch of Nans at the screening tonight, and none of them mentioned Weirdo as far as I’m aware of.  The one account that mentioned her being there doesn’t seem to belong to a person who’s actually in the room, but they’re promising HQ pics soon, so… I have no idea what’s happening.

Meanwhile, Ben only posed with the cast and crew of The Child In Time for Getty, so since he didn’t pose with Wanda and Tim (who a bunch of Nans mentioned being there), it’s very likely that if Weirdo were there, he wouldn’t pose with her either.

Having said all of the above, I’m sure that if Weirdo was present for the screening, we’ll find out about it shortly, and we’ll get shaky sneaky pics.

The real question as far as I’m concerned is not whether Weirdo is there or not.  The real question is whether the quotes used on The Telegraph were real or not.  And why The Telegraph is the only publication who published them.  Twice within the space of a minute.

Because I’m with you 100% JT:

“I cannot believe we are discussing two adult people like this.”

Born near Brussels in 1916, nurse-in-training Andrée de Jongh was just 24 years old when Belgium was invaded by German forces in 1940. As Nazi troops invaded Brussels, de Jongh comforted her distraught father by saying, “You’ll see what we’ll do to them. You’ll see, they are going to lose this war. They started it, but they are going to lose it.”

While working as a nurse in Brussels, de Jongh became aware of the fact that Allied soldiers and airmen were trapped behind German lines. De Jongh created a series of safe houses around the city where these servicemen could safely await escort out of the country along a complicated route through France and Spain and on to Britain.

De Jongh herself became a primary escort, couriering Allied soldiers on the dangerous route. She persuaded British intelligence agency MI9 to provide financial and logistical backing. This network became known as “Comet,” and was one of the most successful escape lines for Allied soldiers during the war. 

In 1943, de Jongh was captured by the Gestapo while escorting three Royal Air Force servicemen. She was interrogated and tortured, and admitted to being the head of the Comet network in an effort to save her colleagues. De Jongh was incarcerated at the Mathausen and Ravensbruck concentration camps, but the network she formed survived until Belgium was liberated by the Allies in 1944. In all, the Comet network escorted between 500 and 800 Allied servicemen from behind Nazi lines to safety. 

De Jongh survived her concentration camp experience, though many of her colleagues on the Comet network were killed, including her father. In 1946, de Jongh received the British George Medal, the American Medal of Freedom, and the French Legion d’honneur. In her home country, she was appointed a Chevalier of the Order of Leopold and received the Croix de Guerre. 

De Jongh returned to nursing, working at a leper colony in the Belgian Congo and later at a hospital in Ethiopia. She was made a countess in 1985. She died in Brussels in 2007, at the age of 91.

[Sources: Obituary published in The Guardian; Obituary published in The Telegraph“Andree de Jongh,” Wikipedia; Women Heroes of World War II, by Kathryn J. Atwood.] 

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David Tennant for Tennant Tuesday
(or whatever day this post may find you)

…from the Telegraph article originally published in November 2008

2006 00 00 - ‘ The Sunday Times ‘ - Stuart - A Life Backwards Portraits by Peter Dench

denchphoto
18 hours ago
Filing some old contact sheets. Found some from a shoot on the set of Stuart a Life Backwards, an adaptation of Alexander Masters critically acclaimed memoir of homeless alcoholic, Staurt Shorter. The TV movie featured actors Benedict #Cumberbatch & @thomashardy_ who played the protagonist. From what I remember, Tom stayed in character while I took the stills, which was slightly unnerving. Boy’s done good #dench #tomhardy #film #tv #actor

Peter Dench Verified account
‏@peterdench
Filing negs; found these of Benedict #Cumberbatch & Tom #Hardy on set of Stuart a Life Backwards #forgottenshoot
3:22 AM - 11 Aug 2016
Peter Dench ‏@peterdench 12 hours ago
@lindashoare I think they were published in the UK Sunday Telegraph magazine, typically I can’t find the tear sheet !

Gov. Cleveland had barely been nominated when the Buffalo Evening Telegraph published a report in which it revealed that, in his days as a Buffalo attorney, Cleveland had impregnated a poor young widow, then had her committed to a mental institution to get out of marrying her, abandoning the unfortunate infant to an orphan asylum.

Campaign advisor Charles Goodyear wired Albany for instructions, and the governor sent a famous six-word reply: “Whatever you do, tell the truth.”

Cleveland himself confided that truth to a selection of influential clergymen.

And the truth was this: A decade before, Cleveland had made the acquaintance of Maria Halpin, an attractive, intelligent widow who had come from Pennsylvania to work in a shirt factory and now was manager of the cloak department at a drygoods store.

Halpin kept company with several Buffalo attorneys, and I explain to the students that she was not a prostitute, but that she may have sometimes complained over dinner about the difficulty of meeting her rent that month or the distressing shabbiness of her only winter coat. It’s entirely possible that she may have, from time to time, received some assistance from these generous friends.

Halpin became pregnant, and named Cleveland as the father.

Was he?

telegraph.co.uk
Research: chilvary could indicate hidden sexism, study finds

Men who demonstrate ‘well intentioned’ sexism are said to see women as warm and pure yet helpless and incompetent. Men who open doors for women are as guilty of sexism as those who are rude to them, according to a new study. Psychologists found that a friendly or chivalrous attitude can mask chauvinistic and patronising views because the men see females as weak creatures in need of their protection. 

They warned that this “benevolent sexism” was harder to spot than the hostile version borne out of an open antipathy. Psychologist Jin Goh of Northeastern University, Boston, said: “While many people are sensitive to sexist verbal offences, they may not readily associate sexism with warmth and friendliness. "Unless sexism is understood as having both hostile and benevolent properties, the insidious nature of benevolent sexism will continue to be one of the driving forces behind gender inequality in our society.”

The study, believed to be the first of its kind, involved 27 pairs of US undergraduate men and women.  Participants were filmed while they played a trivia game together and then chatted afterwards.  Experts then scrutinised their interaction by reporting their impressions and counting certain non verbal cues such as smiles. 

Word count software was also used to further analyse their behaviour. Scientists found that the more hostile sexist participants were perceived as less approachable and friendly in their speech and smiled less during the interaction.  In turn, those who displayed a benevolent sexism were considered more approachable, warmer, friendlier and more likely to smile. 

Read the rest of this post on the telegraph, where it was first published.

Sderot cinema. Israelis bringing chairs 2 hilltop in sderot 2 watch latest from Gaza. Clapping when blasts are heard.

Some western media outlets like the Telegraph, have said Sderot is being battered by missiles and rockets from Gaza. The article “Israel’s front line town of Sderot battered by missiles“ published by the Telegraph on June 9, around the time Sørensen took this picture, says: “Residents of the ‘city of rockets’ just a mile from Gaza describe the fear of living under bombardment by missiles.”

Theater of War: Photo Captures Israelis ‘Watching’ Gaza Being Bombed

It me!

I am in an article about Mx on the Telegraph website, along with two excellents, CJ and Lola.

It’s a really good article! Diversity, accuracy, and a humanising element. :)

Well done, Olivia Goldhill and the Telegraph, for publishing something quite a lot better than the other papers have managed.

Edit: Wow, that came out really passive-aggressive! :S It’s just that it’s the only article I’ve seen so far about Mx that is both accurate and positive, and I’m really chuffed that Olivia Goldhill put the work in and did a great job. :)

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About that Alien Megastructure around  KIC 8462852…

Scientists shocked the world this week with the announcement of an unusual discovery by the Kepler program.   Tabetha Boyajian of Yale University led a team watching a star (KIC 8462852) around 1500 light years from Earth whose unusual light patterns defy current understanding.  Several hypotheses have been offered, including the possibility that indeed, a giant alien megastructure was found.  But it isn’t the first time scientists found unusual bodies deep in space.

In 1967 astronomer Jocelyn Burnell Bell found an unusual object blinking in a dark corner of the sky in the constellation Vulpecula. With a period of 1.3373 seconds and a pulse width of 0.04 second it was the first radio pulsar discovered, although Bell and her Ph.D. advisor astronomer Antony Hewish had no idea what exactly they were seeing. Given the regularity of the signal, they briefly (and mostly jokingly) considered the possibility that they had stumbled upon evidence of extra-terrestrial intelligence, and dubbed it LGM1, for Little Green Men 1. According to Bell:

We did not really believe that we had picked up signals from another civilization, but obviously the idea had crossed our minds and we had no proof that it was an entirely natural radio emission. It is an interesting problem - if one thinks one may have detected life elsewhere in the universe how does one announce the results responsibly? Who does one tell first?

Thomas Gold and Franco Pacini suggested that pulsars were in fact pulsating neutron stars, confirmed with the discovery of a second pulsar in the Crab Nebula. The next year in March 1968, The Daily Telegraph was first to publish the new word:

An entirely novel kind of star came to light on Aug. 6 last year and was referred to, by astronomers, as LGM (Little Green Men). Now it is thought to be a novel type between a white dwarf and a neutron [sic]. The name Pulsar is likely to be given to it. Dr. A. Hewish told me yesterday: “… I am sure that today every radio telescope is looking at the Pulsars.”

The word itself was a combination of pulsating and star, a very literal and descriptive explanation of what scientists were seeing. Today that first pulsar is known variously as CP 1919, PSR B1919+21 and PSR J1921+2153.

Pulsars are so unique that NASA used them as intergalactic locators, drawing a map on the Pioneer plaques to allow extra-terrestrial intelligences to find planet Earth.

In 1974 Antony Hewish became the first astronomer to win a Nobel Prize in Physics, with a bit of controversy surrounding the award as Bell (who actually discovered the pulsar) was not co-awarded the prize.

Perhaps Tabetha Boyajian has found the first concrete evidence of extraterrestrial life.  Let’s hope scientists can devote more resources to study this unusual star.

All images used under CC 3.0 license.