publicitydept

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The Sketchbook Project World Tour is available now!

“In the age of everything digital, …it is almost miraculous that a worldwide artistic endeavor like The Sketchbook Project even exists. To think that over 30,000 people of all ages, artistic abilities, and walks of life have enthusiastically committed time and energy to fill the pages of a sketchbook submitted for public consumption is to realize our collective need for something real. Something permanent. Something that speaks to our human need to take risks, to experiment, and to be understood.” 

—Chris Jobson (This is Colossal) from the foreword

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Infographic Designers’ Sketchbooks
Coming in October from Princeton Architectural Press!

Images: 1) Sketch for an infographic on the shopping habits of American men © Laura Cattaneo, 2012. 2) An infographic illustrating the adulteration of olive oil © Nicholas Blachman, 2013. 3) An infographic of the Memo Process app for iPad (in development)
 © Caroline Oh + Young Sang Cho. 4) A series of illustrations and games for The Guardian about trees, recycling and saving energy © Serge Seidlitz, 2012.

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In 1960, Italian artist Bruno Munari released Circle and Square. Followed over a decade later by Triangle, the trio of books is an in-depth examination of these three shapes and their specific qualities — the circle’s relation to “the divine,” the square as a signifier of safety and enclosure, and the triangle, which is a key connective form for designers.

For the first time, these three studies appear in a single volume. Available now, Bruno Munari: Square Circle Triangle is a visual case study exploring the historical, cultural, and scientific background of the square, circle, and triangle.

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A Love Letter to the City by Stephen Powers

Steve’s hand-painted murals cover the walls and roofs and elevated train tracks of cities across the globe, from Brooklyn, Syracuse, and Philadelphia, to Dublin, Belfast, São Paolo, and Johannesburg. See more in the new book, available now!

Did you know: The mural on the cover was painted in Philadelphia the day Michael Jackson died. Do you see Michael Jackson’s name hidden in the fridge magnets?

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We join an international chorus of well wishers when we say congratulations to Shigeru Ban for his much-deserved 2014 Pritzker Architecture Prize.

A very revealing interview with the architect appears in our 2011 book of conversations with leading Japanese architects and designers Matter in the Floating World.

Here is just one gem from the discussion:

“I believe the strength of a material has nothing to do with the strength of a building. Even a paper tube structure can be made to withstand an earthquake that a concrete building cannot outlive.”

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Tree diagrams through the ages, from The Book of Trees by Manuel Lima, coming this April from PAPress.

Diagram 1: Tree of virtues and tree of vices, from Lambert of Saint-Omer, Liber floridus, 1121.

Diagram 2: Genealogical tree of Charles Magius, from Paul Veronese, Codex Magius, 1568–73.

Diagram 3: Werner Randelshofer, Treeviz, 2007.

Diagram 4: Joe Stone, X-Men Family Tree, 2011.

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Known as one of the greatest book designers of all time, W. A. Dwiggins (1880–1955) was the first American to call himself a graphic designer and spent his career working in a wide range of fields including type design, calligraphy, illustration, and puppeteering.

Featuring numerous typographical designs collected by Dorothy Abbe, Dwiggins’s former assistant and overseer of his work, the expanded edition of William Addison Dwiggins: Stencilled Ornament and Illustration features a new afterword by Bruce Kennett and color reproductions of the designer’s work, highlighting his method of book decoration and other uses of stencil. 

These photographs use urban buildings to frame letterforms. The empty sky becomes the dominant figure, and the buildings become the background that makes them visible. Courtesy of Lisa Rienermann, University of Essen, Germany.

As published in Graphic Design: The New Basics by Ellen Lupton and Jennifer Cole Phillips—the revised and updated edition is coming July 2015.

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Know where to find some Guastavino tile work? Take a photo and upload it to PalacesForThePeople.com, and don’t forget to tweet it with the #Guastavino hashtag! Through Sept. 7, The Museum of the City of New York is holding an exhibition on Rafael Guastavino called Palaces for the People: Guastavino and the Art of Structural Tile, curated by G. Martin Moeller Jr. and John Ochsendorf, and you can help uncover Guastavino’s spaces!

For more information on the work of Guastavino, pick up a copy of Ochsendorf’s book, Guastavino Vaulting: The Art of Structural Tile, and check out this article in the New York Review of Books! More info on the exhibition in the New York Times.

Discussion - free and open to the public
April 11, noon-2 p.m.
Butler Library, Room 523, Columbia University

Guastavino’s Palaces for the People: from archive to exhibition

The speakers will discuss the history of the Guastavino archive, from its last-minute discovery and rescue by Columbia University professor George R. Collins to the creation and design of the exhibition, Palaces for the People. 

• John Ochsendorf, MIT: 
The Guastavino Company and the exhibition, Palaces for the People
• Janet Parks, Avery Library, Columbia University: 
The Guastavino Archive: from acquisition to exhibition
• Chysanthe Broikos, National Building Museum: 
Nature of Architectural Exhibitions
• Daniel Fouad, C&G Design: 
Designing for architectural exhibition

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The Sea Ranch Audio Walking Tour:
Architecture, Landscape, Intentions

You can now tour The Sea Ranch in Sonoma County, California with an audio guide, written and narrated by Donlyn Lyndon, author of The Sea Ranch: Fifty Years of Architecture, Landscape, Place, and Community on the Northern California Coast.

To learn more or to listen to the audio tour (and even take a virtual tour!), visit The Sea Ranch Association website.

Find Perfetto Pencils near you!

Alabama
Behind the Glass

Alaska 
Purple Ravin Inc

Arizona
Intergalactic Inc

California - North
Books Inc, NBC Stationery & Gift, Nest, The Gardener, Last Gasp of San Fran, Mrs. Dalloway’s, Gallery Bookstop, Point Reyes Books, Haight Booksmith, Keplers 2020 FPC, Builders Booksource, Xapno, Bay Co Books Inc, Crocker Art Museum, Just for Fun, Thidwick Books, Lola of North Beach, Leigh’s Favorite Books, Gigi & Rose, Sallie Mac, Linden Tree, Heartfelt, Coastside Books, GG’s Simple Luxuries, Palace Art and Office, University Art Center, Russian Hill Books, Northtown Books, Face in a Book

California - South
LA County Museum of Art, Urbanic, Associated Students/UCLA, Diesel Bookstore, Marz Gallery & Gifts, Upstairs/Pierre La Fond, Seed Peoples Market, New Stone Age, Firefly Inc, Soho, Seaside Papery, Eikon Home, Skylight Books, Yolk, Lundeen’s, Trinkets & Treasures, Kinokuniya Book Stores, Chaucer’s Bookstore, The Quill, Oh Hello Friend, Marie et Cie Inc, 

Colorado
The Tattered Cover, Comfortable Home, Poor Richard’s Bookstore

Connecticut
U Conn Co-op, Breakwater Books, Bank Square Books

Florida
Besame Mucho, Boxelder, Morse Museum of American Art, Macintosh Books & Paper, Classic Bookshop

Georgia
Books @ Manic, Richards Variety Store, Roost Gifts & Decor, Merci Beaucoup Boutique

Illinois
Dick Blick Company, Book Table, Seminary Coop Bookstore, Lake Forest Book Store, Town House Books, Komoda Inc, Art Coop

Indiana
IMA Retail Services, Vons Book Shop

Iowa 
Prairie Lights Books

Kansas
Watermark Books

Kentucky
Carmichaels Bookstore, Morris Book Shop

Louisiana
Red Arrow Workshop

Maine
Portland Museum of Art, Black Parrot

Maryland 
Baltimore Museum of Art, Atomic Books

Massachusetts
Brookline Booksmith, Harvard Bookstore, ICA Store, Museum of Fine Arts, Odyssey Bookshop, New England Mobile, Porter Square Books, Isabella Stewart Gardner, Wellesley Books, Cantabrigia Remex Inc, Trident Bookstore, On Center, Book Ends

Michigan
Found, Papyrus, Middle Earth, paper and i 

Minnesota
Corazon Inc, The Bibelot Shops Inc,

Mississippi
Mississippi Museum

Montana
Red Rooster Trading, Country Bookshelf

Nevada
Nevada Museum of Art

New Hampshire
Innisfree Bookshop

New Jersey
Watchung Booksellers, Lakes Office Supply

New York
Area Kids, Word, Posman Books at Grand, Book Culture, Oblong Books & Music, DIA Center for the Arts, A I Friedman, The Library Shop, Spoonbill & Sugartown, Armosphere, Paper Trail, Bookcourt, Bank Street Book Store, Stewart / Stand Design, Parrish Art Museum, Ink Pad, Powerhouse Arena, O.D. Bookstore

North Carolina
Parker and Otis, University of North Carolina, Moon and Lola, LAKB Design 

Ohio
Fireside Book Shop, Nonnie Waller’s

Oregon 
Portland Art Museum, Pomegranate Home/Garden, Oblation Papers & Press, Susan C Mautz Co

Pennsylvania
Details, Otto Book Store

Rhode Island
Brown University Bookstore, New Port Historical Society

Tennessee
Reading Rock Books

Texas
Mercury Design Studio, Brazos Bookstore Inc, Blanton Museum of Art, Contemporary Arts Museum, Hendley Market, Pattywhacks, Paper Place

Utah
Tabula Rasa, Children’s Hour

Vermont
Northshire Bookstore, Northshire Saratoga LLC, Norwich Bookstore, Red Tail Books Inc

Virginia
Mongrel, Picket Fence

Washington
Three Birds, Third Place Company, Annie’s Arts & Frame, Lucca, Bellevue Art Museum, Avenue Arts, Metropolitan Market #156, Queen Anne Book Company, Abracadabra, Island Books Etc

Washington, DC
National Building, Politics & Prose Bookstore

Wisconsin
Wisconsin Historical, Artist & Display, Books & Company

Singapore
Post Poetics

South Africa
Real Books

Online
Princeton Architectural PressAmazonBN.com, Powells

Just a few brownstones down from 37 East 7th Street you will find McSorley’s Old Ale House, established in 1854. Artist Istvan Banyai captures much of its essence in his illustration “Tis the Season,“ as seen on the cover of the December 9th New Yorker magazine. For more on it’s creation, including an alternate version featuring Winnie The Pooh, visit the New Yorker Online.

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Edit: POSTPONED to 2014

THE MODERN MODULAR 

Joseph Tanney Lecture & Booksigning
Tuesday, November 26 
Trespa Design Center
62 Greene Street, New York

Joseph Tanney, principal and founder of Resolution: 4 Architecture (RES 4), will present a program focusing on THE MODERN MODULAR, a systematic methodology of design that leverages existing methods of prefabrication for residential construction. These efforts offer an option of ‘Mass Customization’ to the single-family housing market, thereby potentially transforming the sub-urban fabric of the American domestic landscape. This fall, Princeton Architectural Press published Modern Modular: The Prefab Houses of Resolution: 4 Architecture by Joseph Tanney and Robert Luntz. The book will be on sale at the event.

In 2003, RES4 won an International Competition for a modern prefabricated home, The Dwell Home.  It has been noted by the Washington Post as the “highest profile modern prefabricated home in America”, and is considered the “Holy Grail” for modern prefab enthusiasts by the Wall Street Journal.

Speaker: Joseph Tanneyfounded Resolution: 4 Architecture with Robert Luntz in New York in 1990. Since its inception, their ten-person office has been internationally published and highly acclaimed, completing projects in the residential, commercial, and public realms. Prior to starting his own practice, Tanney was a student and an employee of both Charles Gwathmey and Peter Eisenman. Tanney has lectured throughout the US, and his firm’s work has been exhibited in museums including the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, the Hammer Museum in Los Angles, and MOMA in New York.

RSVP here

To kick the tires of a building you have to be present at its creation and its completion. You have to let yourself be small beside it, walk around it, walk up the steps, pick (delicately) at the the joints, run your fingers along the handrail, push open the door. You have to let yourself stand back, across the street, across the highway, across the waterfront, and assess. And then you have to go home and write exactly what you think, in simple language, marking a path through history, politics, aesthetics and ethics that anyone can follow. I love her writing—and I will get to some choice quotes—but the first lesson I teach is that attitude. Architecture is for us, the public, and it is going to get scuffed.
—  From Alexandra Lange’s eloquent appreciation of Ada Louise Huxtable
on Design Observer: Kicked A Building Lately?