public programming

A brief note to my rp partners

I am probably one of the worst rp partners in the history of the activity.
- I drop threads.
- I lose threads.
- I take my threads in odd directions that should probably never be explored.
- I go through phases where I’ll only respond to two or three of my partners.
- I go through phases where I’ll only respond to a single thread, and you’re left wondering why I’m not responding to you.

Sometimes I can be a really great partner -
- I might be really on top of replies.
- I might have everything in my ask box answered.
- I might be perfectly in synch with where you’re trying to take the thread.

Sometimes I’m not.

But the great thing is that it’s okay!
- When I drop a thread you like just tell me! Chances are it’s in drafts or I’ve lost it.
- Even if we try a dozen different things and nothing sticks, don’t be afraid to start a new thread with me or come to me with an idea.
- Sometimes I’ll be overwhelmed by everything I have going on, and I’ll have to put you on the list of rp’s to start.
- Sometimes I’ll jump right on the thread and then drop it after a few days.
- Sometimes we’ll carry the thread out all the way to the end, and have a grand old time getting there.

But please, remember that each of my rp partner’s is valuable to me.
- Even the ones my muse doesn’t like.
- Even the ones I’ve only done a thread or two with.
- Even the at I used to rp with and don’t any more.

You are significant.

You matter.

If you think about why any story moves us, it’s because of a quaking moment of recognition. It’s never the shock of the new, it’s the shock of the familiar.
—  Joshua Oppenheimer, the director of the Oscar-nominated film The Look of Silence (2014), speaks about his practice as a documentary filmmaker. 
youtube

Happy Friday! Watch as Matt de la Peña brings his book, Last Stop on Market Street to life.

washingtonpost.com
Sweden Sterilized Thousands of 'Useless' Citizens for Decades

The victims of the public program were mostly young, and mostly female. One was a young woman whose priest believed she had not learned her confirmation lessons well enough, another who couldn’t read a blackboard because she did not have eyeglasses and was deemed to be retarded. From 1934 to 1974, 62,000 Swedes were sterilized as part of a national program grounded in the science of racial biology and carried out by officials who believed they were helping to build a progressive, enlightened welfare state.

The London public transportation system is starting a program that issues a badge and card to people with invisible illnesses. It’s designed for passengers who have trouble standing but don’t appear visibly impaired, like people who have cancer or epilepsy, so they don’t have to feel awkward asking for a seat when they need one. Source

plannedparenthoodaction.org
Guess Which 4 Groups Would Be Disproportionately Hurt by "Defunding" Planned Parenthood
Hint: It’s not the old, rich, white men, trying to shut Planned Parenthood down.

Legislation to “defund” Planned Parenthood will hit  people who rely on federal insurance and public health programs. That’s largely people who already face barriers to  accessing health care as people with low incomes, people of color, people who live in rural areas — who make up the majority of Planned Parenthood’s patients. Meanwhile, the impact of “defunding” Planned Parenthood on people in the LGBT community and whose identities intersect would be particularly acute.

So, it’s anti-abortion politicians like these who want to take basic health care away from people like these.

Impact of “Defund” on People With Low Incomes

With the aim of shutting Planned Parenthood down completely, national “defund” legislation would close health center doors to at least 60% of Planned Parenthood’s patients — those who use public programs like Medicaid (the government-funded insurance plan for people with low incomes) and Title X (the government-funded family planning program, which helps people with low incomes).

Of course, public programs are already prohibited from covering abortion. “Defunding” keeps people who use public programs from getting preventive reproductive and sexual health services like birth control, STD tests, breast cancer screenings, and family planning education at Planned Parenthood health centers. Many of these patients couldn’t get these services anywhere else — and, like we said, many of them are people with low incomes, people of color, and people who live in rural areas.

Impact of “Defund” on People of Color

People of color in the U.S. are less able to access quality health care due to the intersecting consequences of racism, sexism, classism, xenophobia, and other systemic barriers. So, they’re more likely to rely on federally funded programs to access health care.

The Black Community

“Defunding” Planned Parenthood would be devastating to Black communities. Key points:

  • Of the 2.5 million people who rely on Planned Parenthood for health care every year, 370,000 identify as African American or Black.
  • Among nonelderly Americans on Medicaid, 11 million are Black.

If they were prevented from accessing Planned Parenthood, many Black patients would have no other place to go for the services Planned Parenthood provides.

This harmful legislation wouldn’t just keep Black patients from getting care – it would undermine their ability to obtain full reproductive freedom. Too often, Planned Parenthood is the only health care provider many patients access. That means their care is more than just reproductive health services – Planned Parenthood connects patients with resources to improve other areas of their lives.

The Latino Community

“Defunding” Planned Parenthood would be devastating to the Latino community. Key points:

  • Around 575,000 Latinos come to Planned Parenthood health centers annually (nearly a quarter of Planned Parenthood’s patients).
  • Among the nonelderly Americans on Medicaid, 18 million are Latino.
  • If they were prevented from accessing Planned Parenthood, Latino patients may have no other place to go for the services it provides.

Planned Parenthood sees patients regardless of immigration status and is one of the only places undocumented people can turn to for care. Given that the majority of undocumented immigrants in the U.S. are Latino, “defunding” legislation would have a disproportionate impact on them.

What’s more, “defunding” would put two crucial Planned Parenthood programs at risk of disappearing: Raíz, which helps Latinos access health care and sex education, and Promotores de Salud, which brings reproductive health education into Latino homes and community-gathering locations.

Impact of “Defund” on People in Rural Areas

If patients who rely on public programs are blocked from care at Planned Parenthood, many would have nowhere else to go. There simply aren’t enough other reproductive health care providers out there. In areas where other providers do exist, many don’t take patients who rely on public health programs. Key points:

  • 21% of counties have no safety-net family planning alternative should their local Planned Parenthood health center close.
  • More than half of Planned Parenthood’s health centers are located in rural and underserved communities.
  • More than two thirds of states already report difficulty ensuring enough providers for Medicaid.
  • Providers of ob-gyn care who accept Medicaid, such as Planned Parenthood, are in particularly short supply.

Impact of “Defund” on the LGBTQ Community

“Defunding” Planned Parenthood also would negatively impact LGBTQ health. Members of the LGBT community face greater health challenges than their heterosexual peers because of stigma and discrimination. People in the LGBTQ community who also are people of color, or have low incomes, or who live in rural areas — or whose identities intersect — have even more obstacles to reproductive health services. For example, LGBTQ people of color face particularly high rates of discrimination from medical providers, and systemic harassment.

Planned Parenthood understands that LGBTQ people have the right to safe abortion services, access to contraceptives, STD testing and a range of other health services free from stigma, discrimination or coercion. Losing Planned Parenthood would lose this safe space for LGBTQ people seeking basic health care.

Say It Loud: #IStandWithPP

If anti-abortion politicians “defund” Planned Parenthood, shut down its health centers, and block its 2.5 million patients from care, a national health disaster would ensue — and the groups mentioned in this blog would be hurt the most. Take a stand against cutting them off from care. Take action to stand with Planned Parenthood and its patients!

youtube

NASA TV Public-Education [source]

NASA TV airs a variety of regularly scheduled, pre-recorded educational and public relations programming 24 hours a day on its various channels.  Programs include “NASA Gallery”, which features photographs and video from NASA’s history; “Video File”, which broadcasts b-roll footage for news and media outlets; “Education File”, which provides special programming for schools; “NASA Edge” and “NASA 360”, hosted programs that focus on different aspects of NASA; and “This Week @ NASA”, which shows news from NASA centers around the country.  Live ISS coverage and related commentary is aired daily at 11 a.m. EST and repeats throughout the day.

The network also provides an array of live programming, such as 24-hour coverage of Space Shuttle missions, ISS events (spacewalks, media interviews, educational broadcasts), press conferences and rocket launches.  These often include running commentary by members of the NASA Public Affairs Office who serve as the “voice of Mission Control,” including Rob Navias, Josh Byerly, Nicole Cloutier and Brandi Dean.

In the United States, NASA Television’s Public and Media channels are MPEG-2 digital C-band signals carried by QPSK/DVB-S modulation on satellite AMC-3, transponder 15C, at 87 degrees west longitude.  Downlink frequency is 4000 MHz, horizontal polarization, with a data rate of 38.86 Mhz, symbol rate of 28.1115 Ms/s, and ¾ FEC.  A Digital Video Broadcast (DVB) compliant Integrated Receiver Decoder (IRD) is needed for reception. 

NASA’s livestream.  Can be used to see the 2017 Solar Eclipse.

bumble-key  asked:

I was watching the tv show Zoo and I saw that the Bronx Zoo used the cheetahs as ambassador animals. They trained them as cubs with puppies so that they would be used to people. The cheetahs would be put on leashes and talked about to crowds of people as educations animals. I was wondering if you had any thoughts about this because in my opinion it doesn't seem super safe but the people at the zoo are professionals.

This is actually a pretty common practice - most of the big zoos with cheetah programs do use them as ambassador animals. They’re pretty much the most safe cats to do that sort of program with (although I’m not sure the actual official written reason for that - mostly what I’ve heard said is that they’re “more doglike” which is pretty obviously a colloquial reason). Cheetahs are not considered as dangerous as the rest of the big cats - even the highly restrictive language in H.R.1818 about big cats and public contact leaves a loophole for these ambassador interactions to continue while forbidding everything else. 

I wrote USDA to ask about their restrictions on handling big cats in public, and they responded that:

“Our handling regulations ( 2.131) specify requirements for humane and safe handling of animals.  2.131©(1) requires that during public exhibition, any animal must be handled so that there is minimal risk of harm to the animal and the public…; 2.131(d)(3) requires that during public exhibition, dangerous animals such as lions, tigers, ….must be under the direct control and supervision of a knowledgeable and experienced animal handler.”     

Not included in their response - because of how I phrased my question - is the requirement that dangerous animals be a sufficient distance away from the public or behind a barrier. 


Now, what’s really interesting about the Bronx ambassador cheetah program… is the tack they use on their cheetahs in public, and the story behind it. It’s an important story because it emphasizes both a) why you never make assumptions about how a zoo handles animals until you talk to someone who works with them and b) exactly how hard it can be to pin down what regulatory bodies or people influence how a zoo chooses to do things. 

What I noticed when I watched the show that I absolutely could not explain? Is that the ambassador cheetah boys at Bronx wear prong collars. 

(Yes, I literally did just take photos of the TV screen. Go with it). 

Now, as someone who is very familiar with prong collars from working with domestic dogs, this choice confused the hell of out me. My thought process was this: prong collars can be really traumatizing for sensitive dogs, cheetahs are known to be super sensitive snowflakes with regards to stress, so what the hell are they doing putting those on those animals?? I asked around to a few people in various aspects of the animal management world, and nobody had ever heard of facilities using prong collars on cheetahs nor could think of why this choice would be made. At which point, I was pretty appalled - but they’d made the choice to allow it to be shown on TV, which meant there had to be something more to the story. 

I was incredibly lucky in that a couple of weeks later, I got the chance to actually talk to the director of the Bronx Zoo at an event. I asked him straight out if he would clarify something for me that had kind of shocked me when I watched the show (and since I hadn’t run into any program animals staffers, could he please spare the time) and described my thought process. He was immediately receptive - honestly, it seemed like a question he’d been expecting at some point- and we spent a good five minutes chatting about the choice and why it was made. 

The director told me that the prong collars were required under USDA regulations as a backup to the harnesses the cats wore. If you look closely in the show, you can see that there are two leashes coming off each cheetah - the one attached to the harness is the primary leash, and the one attached to the prong is carried by the backup handler in case the primary handler drops the leash or loses control of the animal somehow. It was explained to me that the prong collar was required because in case the leash was dropped because the cheetah’s prey drive kicked in, the tack the backup leash was attached to had to be something the cat wouldn’t just run straight through. At which point, yes, the collar is meant to be aversive on the off-chance it’s needed - but that’s to save someone’s life, at that point. I was surprised the cats didn’t find having the collar on aversive in normal circumstances, but I was told that the leash attached to the prong is never supposed to be used to control the cat except in an emergency. This all makes sense, and although in the world of dog training it’s not ideal management of prey drive, I can absolutely understand the reasoning behind it when used with a large, fast, predatory cat. 

…except that it’s not actually a USDA requirement. No other facility I know of uses prong collars with their cheetahs in public. I had asked the director during our chat where I would be able to look up the regulation, but he didn’t really know, so I emailed USDA to ask and got the response in quotes above. I don’t think it’s likely the director lied to me - even if you don’t believe that zoo staff operate in good faith, that’s just way too easy of a lie to get caught in for someone in his position to risk - so what could explain that discrepancy?

Local USDA inspectors. I asked around a bit, checking in with people who have spend their careers interacting with the USDA, and it seems most likely that whomever is the inspector for the Bronx is the person who decided that prongs as backups to the harnesses were necessary for ensuring public safety. USDA inspectors are supposed to do an impartial job of inspecting facilities according to the AWA standards, but in reality they do have a lot of power as individuals. Some inspectors abuse this, some don’t, some just get weirdly involved in how things run. My educated guess is that it sounds like this is a case of the latter - someone within USDA requiring actions from the zoo above and beyond the actual standards. (It would, in theory, be possible to track down who the inspector is for the Bronx and ask them, but I haven’t followed up on it at this point because I have the most important information - the thought process behind the use of tack and the fact that it’s a purposeful choice to balance welfare and safety). It could also be possible that the use of prongs is how the staff member who is in charge of program animals for Bronx chose to interpret the USDA regulations. 

Whatever the reason is, though, it’s an interesting deviation from standard practice to note. I don’t think it’s a bad or abusive choice - it’s just different. I do wonder if their public program training protocols are different from those at other places with cheetah programs that don’t use prongs, but that’s mostly academic. The animals aren’t bothered unduly by the collars and the public is kept safe. 

TL;DR Government regulations and the requirements imparted by the people who enforce them are complicated and confusing, and even I run into situations where I have to ask zoo staff why they do what they do because my assumptions are way off base. 

Watch on commandtower-solring-go.tumblr.com

A List of Things Donald Trump Has Done - Week 1

Trumps actions stand alone in their absurdity, sheer danger and as he puts it “enormity” that Australian journalist and host of The Project, Waleed Aly, found that simply listing them all out loud, spoke louder than dissecting them individually. The full list includes

  1. Signed First Executive Order to Rollback Obama Care
  2. Took Control of Nuclear Codes
  3. Declares January 20 (his inauguration day) to be the National Day of Patriot Devotion
  4. The White House Spokesmen lied in his first press briefing about the size of Trump’s inauguration “The biggest in History”
  5. A Senior Trump Adviser supported the lies, claiming they were ‘Alternative Facts’
  6. Ordered the shut down of the National Park Service Twitter account after they retweeted photos comparing the sizes of Trumps and Obama’s inauguration crowds
  7. Trump planted staffers to cheer and applaud at a speech he gave to the CIA
  8. Bypassed anti-nepotism law to hire his son-in-law as a senior White House adviser
  9. His office confirmed that he’ll never release his tax records
  10. Withdrew America from the TPP (Trans Pacific Partnership). A multi-national economic deal that is seven years in the making
  11. Allegedly allowed his businesses to take money from foreign government
  12. Now is facing a new law suit for breaching the constitution.
  13. Claimed the election suffered mass voter fraud (2-3 million votes illegitimate, which no evidence supports such high numbers) specifically with regard to dead voters and voters registered in more than one states.
  14. The white house spokes men (mentioned earlier), his son-in-law (also mentioned earlier), his youngest daughter, his White House strategist and his Treasury Secretary are all registered to vote in more than one state
  15. Reinstated a global GAG rule to cut all US funding to international NGOs that offer and council women on abortion
  16. His party passed a bill that permanently bans American women from using federal funds or private health insurance towards abortion services
  17. Vowed to cut funding to Violence Against Women’s programs, National Arts and Humanities, Legal Services, Minority Business Development Programs, Public Broadcasting, and the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
  18. Trumps Administration removed the Spanish Version of the White House Website
  19. Deleted Website pages of Civil Rights, LGBT Rights, and Climate Change
  20. Overturned the ban on two major gas projects where a fear of water contamination, and destruction of sacred land is present
  21. Ordered a total media blackout on the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Agriculture and Health and Human Services.
  22. Imposed a hiring and regulatory freeze across all government agencies
  23. Except for the Military and a handful of public safety sectors
  24. Drafted orders to temporarily suspend America’s refugee intake
  25. Syria refugees face a indefinite ban on entry to America
  26. Announced plans to halve America’s Asylum Program
  27. Drafted new plans to suspend Visas from people from Iraq, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen
  28. Plans to open CIA black-sights, around the world, to reintroduce torture as an interrogation tactic
  29. Moved to redirect allocated Federal Funds to start building a $20 billion wall on the southern boarder
  30. Suggested to cancel his upcoming meeting with the Mexican President, to him publicly on Twitter, after the Mexican President refused to fund the building of the wall. The meeting was canceled
  31. Following this, he flagged a 20% tax increase to all imported goods from mexico in order to recoup the cost of the wall
  32. Stated he would publish a weekly list of crimes committed by immigrants
  33. Stripped Federal Funds from US cities that provide sanctuary for Illegal Immigrants
  34. Laid the legal ground work for mass deportation

It can be easy to lose track of what is happening with Trump at the moment, but it is vital that, if you hope you fight back, even so much as build a healthy opinion on him, you know what he is doing. So please, read every entry on this list. In a single week, Trump has done more unimaginable things that people give him credit for. This has been a week, people. There are still over 200 left, at the least

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“It’s gone for good. And if some politician told you otherwise, they were lying to you. And I won’t do that. Now, the reason why jobs like yours have disappeared isn’t just because of cheaper labor in some other country. Primarily, it’s technology. Technology allows one person to do what used to take ten. Now, that might be great for the economy, but it’s not for you, or your family. Now, a moment ago, Melissa asked me what it was like to become president overnight, and I told her it was the scariest moment of my life. It doesn’t even compare to what you’re going through, sir: the fear of not knowing if you can provide for your family. Not since the Industrial Revolution has our economy gone through such a dynamic transformation. We need solutions. So here’s what we’re gonna do. We’re gonna create a public-works program that’s gonna deal with the failing infrastructure issues around the country, and anyone who has lost a manual-labor manufacturing job in the last four years because of this changing economy - their names will go to the top of the list for these new jobs. But I also want to create programs at every public college and university across the country so unemployed workers can become educated in these new and emerging technologies. And I want you to know that I believe that the American government has a responsibility, not just to maintain, but create opportunities for the American people, and that’s what we’re going to do.”

Like, standing ovation much? I think Designated Survivor just earned iself a place on my ‘favourite fictional political moments’ list, just after the very beginning of Newsroom and Peter Quinn’s angry speech about the Middle East.

Maybe if real politicians spent less time watching day-time TV and talking to one other and more on well-written fiction, things could actually change for the better.

Applying to a German University

Have you ever wondered what it would be like, not just to study abroad for a semester or year, but rather to be a full-time student at a German university? These thoughts may cross your mind, and may be held back by looking around to see everyone else staying stateside. We assure you, however, that there are others out there applying abroad. Germany has some of the top colleges in the world (3 in the top 50) and generally comes at a much lower cost than those in the states.

This said, we get that it is an intimidating process to apply abroad. There are fewer people to ask questions and guidance counselors aren’t typically informed about options. We’d like to do our part to help! As such, we recruited American CBYXer (see here: ) Mackenzie to answer your questions on the application process. She herself is currently at the end of the process with acceptance letters in hand.


What made you want to apply to a German university for grad school rather than an American university?

I completed my bachelor’s degree at Jacobs University in Bremen Germany, and I’ve been working with a German organization since graduation, so Germany is sort of like a second home for me. Other than that, cost plays a big role.

What was the first step to applying to a German university? Could you give a general step-by-step process of what took you to now deciding on a specific university?

I started off by searching for different masters degree programs in public policy, political science and international relations. Once I had a list of programs, I narrowed it down based on location, program quality, and university reputation. When I began the process, I didn’t think of considering any German-language programs. I’ve learned German for about 6 years now, but I didn’t think that my written German skills were strong enough to pursue a degree program 100% auf Deutsch. Once I started shopping around, I realized that taking the TestDaF (basically like TOEFL for non-Native German speakers) would give me more options down the road, and allow me to apply to a few of the bilingual programs I found particularly appealing.  

Other than price, what is the biggest difference between applying to a German v. American university?

German universities need a stamped form for everything from language requirements to internship experience to high school transcripts, and this can be quite time consuming. I was quite surprised when I had to call my high school in Kansas to tell them I needed an extra copy of my high school transcript.

Do you need to know German to study at a German university?

Not necessarily. Almost all of the private universities in Germany are taught exclusively in English, and more and more public school programs are being offered in English as well. This being said, it doesn’t hurt to be able to read a bit of German to help you navigate the application process as well as your future life in Germany more generally.

Explain the language requirements and when you would need to take those tests

Oh boy. This was by far the most stressful part of the process. Once I discovered that one of the programs I had planned to apply to had a TestDaF requirement, I was pretty nervous about how I should get started. Luckily, I knew a few people who had already taken the test, so I asked for advice on how to prepare.

The TestDaF has reading, listening, writing and oral components, and is graded on this scale:

The program that I wanted to apply for required a minimum average score of 4, but I know that some programs have other requirements (e.g. at least a 4 in all categories, minimum 3 etc.)

To prepare, I had a friend bring back a prep book from Germany (they are surprisingly hard to find on Amazon), and I worked from the book. The test is similar to standardized tests in the US in that a lot of the process revolves around familiarizing yourself with the style of questions, and making sure that you are able to complete the exam within the given timeframe. Once you know what to expect, and can identify your weaknesses, it is much easier to prepare.

What do you predict will be the full cost of your studies?

It depends. If I decide to study at a private university, it will cost me roughly 30% of comparable programs in the States. For example, the Masters in Public Policy (MPP) at an elite private school like Georgetown has a sticker cost of around $50,000 year, whereas the MPP program at the Hertie School of Governance is priced at 16,250 euros/year.

If I accept an offer to a public school program, I will only need to cover my living expenses (rent, health insurance, public transportation pass, etc). In a German city like Berlin, these costs are all very reasonable.

What is the difference between public and private universities from the perspective of someone applying?

I’d say the differences are pretty similar to the differences in the States. A private school education will get you smaller classes, more one-on-one time with professors, better networking and/or professional development opportunities etc. Because Germans can attend university tuition free in Germany, public university programs are often quite large so the experience is a lot less individualized. I should say that this really depends on the program though!

What advice would you give an American starting the process of applying to a German uni?

Do your research, read the fine print, and make sure you understand all of the requirements! Most of the application deadlines are later than US university deadlines, however, some special programs (particularly the ones designed for a more international audience) have earlier deadlines. To be on the safe side, start doing your research about a year and a half before you plan to start the program. Also, always get stamped copies of everything- because Germans are old school like that.

What were the most helpful resources as an American in finding a university/applying?

I found the TestDaf website helpful, as well as the universities themselves. When I emailed a program contact, they typically got back with me within a few days.


Have more questions for Mackenzie? Shoot them to us and we’d be happy to follow up with a video on follower-questions!

1. Maybe they should stop writing fan fiction. Arguably, Moffat should have stopped after the debacle of Jekyll back in 2007, but it was low budget and people can learn from their mistakes. He went on to make something of a mess in Dr. Who. Now S4 of Sherlock was a bit of a mess. He’s going through the classics, because they know these will sell. That impacts us as an audience, and it impacts the public that funds BBC programs.

2. Dracula is already part of the homoerotic literature tradition. I just posted a series of scholarly articles about it, but this is the best non-fiction book on the topic of vampirism and media of which I am aware. I took a course from this man in university, and it’s amazing. The Vampire Lectures by Laurence Rickels.

“Bela Lugosi may – as the eighties gothic rock band Bauhaus sang – be dead, but the vampire lives on. A nightmarish figure dwelling somewhere between genuine terror and high camp, a morbid repository for the psychic projections of diverse cultures, an endlessly recyclable mass-media icon, the vampire is an enduring object of fascination, fear, ridicule, and reverence. In The Vampire Lectures, Laurence A. Rickels sifts through the rich mythology of vampirism, from medieval folklore to Marilyn Manson, to explore the profound and unconscious appeal of the undead.Based on the course Rickels has taught at the University of California, Santa Barbara, for several years (a course that is itself a cult phenomenon on campus), The Vampire Lectures reflects Rickels’s unique lecture style and provides a lively history of vampirism in legend, literature, and film. Rickels unearths a trove that includes eyewitness accounts of vampire attacks; burial rituals and sexual taboos devised to keep vampirism at bay; Hungarian countess Elisabeth Bathory’s use of girls’ blood in her sadistic beauty regimen; Bram Stoker’s Dracula, with its turn-of-the-century media technologies; F. W. Murnau’s haunting Nosferatu; and crude, though intense, straight-to-video horror films such as Subspecies. He makes intuitive, often unexpected connections among these sometimes wildly disparate sources.More than simply a compilation of vampire lore, however, The Vampire Lectures makes an original and intellectually rigorous contribution to literary and psychoanalytic theory, identifying the subconscious meanings, complex symbolism, and philosophical arguments – particularly those of Marx, Freud, and Nietzsche – embeddedin vampirism and gothic literature.“

3. I’ve been collecting vampire content since I was nine, and I know some of us are glad that Carmilla isn’t being touched, but…there is enough to queerbait with in Dracula. BBC is supposedly trying to work on their representation numbers, and only funding new shows that show they will work toward that goal, but the decision on that came pre S4 of Sherlock.

@tania-grey @yorkiepug @conan-doyles-carnations @wssh-watson @leaastf

washingtonpost.com
Trump’s first full education budget: Deep cuts to public school programs in pursuit of school choice
Documents obtained by The Post show how the president wants to reshape K-12 education and college financial aid.
By https://www.facebook.com/danielle.douglas.5245

The cuts would come from eliminating at least 22 programs, some of which Trump outlined in March. Gone, for example, would be $1.2 billion for after-school programs that serve 1.6 million children, most of whom are poor, and $2.1 billion for teacher training and class-size reduction.

The documents obtained by The Post — dated May 23, the day the president’s budget is expected to be released — outline the rest of the cuts, including a $15 million program that provides child care for low-income parents in college; a $27 million arts education program; two programs targeting Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian students, totaling $65 million; two international education and foreign language programs, $72 million; a $12 million program for gifted students; and $12 million for Special Olympics education programs.

Other programs would not be eliminated entirely, but would be cut significantly. Those include grants to states for career and technical education, which would lose $168 million, down 15 percent compared to current funding; adult basic literacy instruction, which would lose $96 million (down 16 percent); and Promise Neighborhoods, an Obama-era initiative meant to build networks of support for children in needy communities, which would lose $13 million (down 18 percent).

The Trump administration would dedicate no money to a fund for student support and academic enrichment that is meant to help schools pay for, among other things, mental-health services, anti-bullying initiatives, physical education, Advanced Placement courses and science and engineering instruction.

These are the cuts proposed in order to spend more on public funding for private schools (which is what “school choice” is a bullshit euphemism for) and bureaucracy. 

This week’s #tbt looks back at a major exhibition of works by celebrated African American artist Romare Bearden, which opened at MoMA in 1971. It grew, in part, out of demands made by the Art Workers Coalition (AWC), an activist organization that advocated for New York City museums to improve their ethical relationship to artists and to the public. They argued that museums should improve public access by waiving admission fees and implement more inclusive exhibition policies to encourage shows by women and minorities. In 1969, the AWC submitted a list of demands to MoMA, including that a “section of the Museum, under the direction of black artists, should be devoted to showing the accomplishments of black artists.” MoMA’s Board of Trustees recommended that the institution embrace a more inclusive approach to collecting, exhibiting, and public programming, and the Bearden exhibition was one of the first outcomes of this recommendation. See images of the installation, read the out-of-print exhibition catalogue, and more. 22 of #52exhibitions

[Romare Bearden. The Dove. 1964. Cut-and-pasted printed paper, gouache, pencil, and colored pencil on board. Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Fund. Photo: Thomas Griesel]

Something I want to note about homeless shelters-in many districts in the US homeless people have no rights to nondiscrimination in shelters and discrimination is rampant. 

 Some courts will insist that homeless shelters don’t count as housing or as public accommodations and don’t apply the non-discrimination laws that would affect even something like an ordinary restaurant (though those are grossly under-enforced in general).  There are shelters who have received public money that have been legally allowed to discriminate in regards to things like gender, race, sexuality, trans status, religion, and disability.  

Even if homeless people had the sort of resources to sue for equal access in court, which they don’t in reality have in any substantial way at all, there are large swaths of the US where they would just be told the law doesn’t apply to them.

Homeless shelters are a major area of discrimination in the US.  It’s not uncommon for LGBT people, POC (especially Black people), disabled people, non-Christians, drug users, women, mothers who are homeless with their children, teenage boys/teenage male assigned at birth kids trying to be housed with their mothers and siblings (this usually happens to children of color far more than white children), domestic abuse victims, immigrants, leftists, people who speak English as a second language or have limited English, and many others to face pretty intense discrimination in accessing even the extremely limited amount of homeless shelters that do exist.  And the law absolutely fails them in a myriad of ways over and over again.

If I as a queer trans person tried to access a shelter, including ones that take public funds, and they just flat out told me they don’t serve LGBT people it’s not even clearly illegal in the US, just as it wouldn’t be clearly illegal for them to refuse to make the building one I could physically use as a disabled person.  While I haven’t lived in a shelter, I’ve heard numerous horror stories from people I knew personally, and the closest shelter to where I live (which is still over an hour drive away, which, how would I even get there?) is one that refuses to serve people like me.

While there are some very good shelter workers out there and some programs that really are respectful and caring to the people they are supposed to serve, abuse, paternalistic control, theocratic bullshit, and discrimination are extremely common.  And the social and legal systems typically choose to support and enable that abuse.   This system is no substitute for a real robust public emergency housing program, let alone a full housing or adequate public housing system.