public land

4

Public Lands/ Exploration/ Night Sky/ 

Searching for a meteor burst last night in the Bald Hills above Redwood creek in Redwood National Park.  

I had visions of a Meteor burst behind this fire tower, if you zoom in a few images have a faint line or two, but overall every time I would place and focus the lens the meteors would then show up in a different part of the sky.

*note on editing:
I find it difficult to edit night photos. It’s a tough call between taking all of the amazing colors the long exposure captures, and trying to portray the scene more closely to the way I experienced it. I always find that to my eyes it looks more silvery blue, but the camera often finds many colors. Last nights photos out of camera had amazing greens, purple and blue which to people viewing the photos might be more interesting. But that’s not how it felt to be there alone in the dark walking in starlight.  Maybe I’ll share an alternate edit at another time.

Some cleared roads in Yellowstone National Park opened for bicyclists this week. Work continues to open major routes to cars by April 21. Soon, millions of people will visit the park to enjoy its amazing natural wonders. Just remember, bison always have the right of way. Photo by National Park Service.

Olympic National Park’s rugged shoreline is rich with life. Invertebrates of countless shapes, sizes, colors and textures inhabit the tide pools along Washington’s coast. Pictured here is a starfish with Giant Green Anemones that opens its tentacles like flower petals in the tidal waters. Photo courtesy of Keith Ladzinski.

Exploring in Colorado

(With reference to this post here)

Required supplies:

  • Water
  • more than that.
  • I’m not kidding people die of dehydration more than anything else I’m talking 2 liters minimum.
  • snacks
  • first-aid and survival kit including after-bite, splint supplies and emergency signalling devices, and a thermal blanket.  I am absolutely not kidding people get lost a mile from the road and die of exposure.
  • Map, your phone won’t work more than a mile from city limits.
  • change of socks.
  • something iron.
  • an offering or three.  you might not need any, you might need all of them.

Etiquette:

  • Always close any gate you open. Even if the fence around it is gone.  Both from a spiritual perspective and becuase there’s a nonzero chance the farm isn’t abandoned and the livestock is lurking in the scrub.
  • Cattle will stare at you.  As long as they’re on the other side of the fence or river or ditch it’s fine.  If there’s no barrier you need to leave.  Range cattle fight coyotes and cougar and the worst of winter and don’t give a single fuck about you.
  • That’s not lore Range Cattle will fucking kill you.
  • Never approach any horse, but especially the ones without humans.  They’re either fae or feral and the odds of them eating your hands are about the same.
  • Drink your water.
  • There are Others in Colorado, but the relationship is not nearly so adversarial out here.  They’re like your neighbors but only sometimes corporeal.  Mind your manners and obey any posted signage and you’ll be fine.
  • posted signage includes trees fallen across paths or washed-out sections of trail (trail closed), bits of dead animal on stumps or fence posts (occupied, fuck off) and the smell of urine (Mountain lion or bear turn right the fuck around)
  • Don’t eat anything you find there unless you brought a permit for it with you.  Anyone who says you can forage on public land is a liar and going to get their ass poisoned or cursed.
  • If you did bring a permit, leave an offering anyway.  The Law of Man is not the same as The Law of Mountains and you need to pay taxes in both.
  • Salute magpies, and any bird larger than them.
  • Everyone going uphill yields going to everyone going downhill, regardless of whether or not they’re human or real.
  • If you’re over 7000 feet and you seem to have picked up another member to your party, it’s just the mountain wondering what’s happening.  It’s like bird watching for them.  Be polite, pick up your trash and call the mountain whatever name it gives you.
  • Drink your fucking water.
  • If you feel like you’re being followed, especially at dusk, you absolutely turn around and tell whatever’s behind you you know they’re there.  This is becuase it’s almost certainly coyotes and they need to be told to fuck off.  If you can see what’s following you, face it and walk calmly backwards towards civilization until it goes away or you’re back in your car.  If you can’t see what it is, tell it you’re headed home now, then you can turn back around and proceed calmly back from whence you came.
  • Do not, under any circumstances, run.
  • things that run are meant to be chased and everything up here is faster than you are.
  • also you’ll fall off a fucking cliff.
  • If you get back to the car or edge of the wild space and still feel like you’re being followed, check your shoes, pockets and any baggage for extras and leave them.  If you’re STILL being followed, they’re being rude and you’re allowed to chuck a rock at them.
  • I’m not kidding about the water.
  • Don’t go into any “abandoned” buildings because 1. there’s a nonzero chance the building isn’t actually abandoned and then you have to explain to the rancher what the fuck you’re doing on their land 2. if it is abandoned it’s probably structurally unstable 3. the only things inside are rattlesnakes and tetanus.
  • Exception to above: if you hear thunder, you’re close enough to be struck. you can step inside then, but do not touch anything, especially the building it’self.
  • You are encouraged to walk out to abandoned tractors and plowshares and touch them.  Don’t move them but stop to say hi and have some water.
  • If you find human remains, don’t panic.  If they’re out there, they wanted to be found.  Write down (you won’t be able to remember later, trust me) where you found them and inform the park service/police as soon as possible.
  • Drink your water.

(Tip Jar)

Wildflowers carpet the hillside at Gila Box Riparian National Conservation Area. The 23,000-acre area is truly an oasis in the desert with four perennial waterways that are the lifeline for this remarkable place. The Gila River canyon section, known as the Gila Box, is composed of patchy mesquite woodlands, mature cottonwoods, sandy beaches and grand buff-colored cliffs. Bonita Creek – popular for birdwatching, hiking and picnicking – is lined with large cottonwoods, sycamores and willows. Cliff dwellings, historic homesteads, Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep and over 200 species of birds make this year-round watery Arizona spot worth the drive. Photo by @mypubliclands.

3

Exploration/Adventure/Public Lands/

I went out to a spot in the hills with a picnic table and a little bit of 4g service. I worked on my laptop and got some sun and fresh air while I was at it. I made friends with Antony and Nisha who were visiting from London. On the way home I entered the fog. Today was a good day.

Shoutout to @mkhunterz who suggested I post some more forest photos when I asked for suggestions last week.

anonymous asked:

This is going to sound like a stupid question, but it seems like most of your campsites are literally just in the middle of no where, not like at a legit camping ground. Is that necessarily legal? Asking because I'm real inspired to try something like this myself

This is not a dumb question at all - and perfectly relevant to our current fight to protect our public lands.  I can legally camp in the middle of nowhere because I do so on public lands - lands owned by all American Citizens.  This is land set aside for public use - be it camping, hunting, fishing, biking, climbing, hiking, etc…  Public Lands are owned and supported by tax payers and also sometimes referred to as Federal Land (most research shows public land costs about $4 dollars per tax payer a year).  Restrictions depend on the agency that manages the area - most BLM (Bureau of Land Management) land has very few restrictions and allows for camping almost anywhere (without the need for a campground).  However, I strongly encourage Leave No Trace ethics when camping in wilderness and if you are going to camp on our public lands please go to the following link and read the 7 Leave No Trace Principles:

 https://lnt.org/learn/7-principles 

I prefer to camp in the wild - to leave the city behind and experience the outdoors as a refuge from human impact - and in order to continue to experience it as such we need to keep it looking as if we were never there.  I am a climber, a hunter, a mountaineer, a fisher, a hiker, a biker, and most importantly I was lucky enough to be born in the USA which gives me access to public wilderness as if I had the money to own a cabin in the mountains.  However, I don’t have the money to own a cabin and so when the weekend rolls around I throw a few things in the back of the Land Cruiser and head for public lands… I find a spot that is my own, that feels as if I am one of the few lucky enough to sit on this rock and watch the sun go down - and I am lucky.  

Watch the video link below:  4 minute bipartisan history of how the USA came to have so much public federal land, specifically in the west.  This video educated me on how almost all federal land has always been federal land - and is not land that was taken from the states:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rC_mnRu-4gA

It is my opinion that there is falsehood in state legislator’s desire to want public lands to be taken from the federal government and given to the state for the resident’s interests and stats seem to support this.  Federal land is held in a trust for the use of the American people -  and that’s it, that’s all, it is there for our future generations - so that I can teach my kid to ethically hunt and camp in the mountains just as my grandfather and father taught me.  Some states do a great job with land they manage for public access, but the problem is that the land is no longer explicitly a trust and if the wrong individuals become elected, or are already are elected, that land can now be sold to private entities and will no longer be accessible to the public. In FACT 156 MILLION acres of Federal Public Land has been transferred to states and of that land 70% has been sold to private entities - that is 110 MILLION acres that we don’t have shared access to use anymore.  I would rather not risk the possibility of my land being sold off so that I can not use it.  Historically this has occurred when a state’s budget isn’t balanced because it is pretty easy to sell of a chunk of land to compensate for debt. 

Please read the Field and Stream article in the Link below it is easy and incredibly informative:

http://www.fieldandstream.com/keep-public-lands-in-public-hands#page-3

Please vote to protect our public lands! 

Public lands for our use and what agency manages them can be seen in the map below: 


Last week, Glacier National Park in Montana received its first snow of the season. While it closed Going-to-the-Sun Road from St. Mary to Logan Pass for a short time, that section of the road has reopened, offering visitors as chance to enjoy a beautiful, wintery world. Photo by National Park Service.

Need something to get you through Monday? Here’s a pic of an adorable clutch of baby peregrine falcons on banding day at Cabrillo National Monument in California. At birth, peregrine chicks weigh about 1.5 ounces, but they grow quickly – they can double their weight in just six days. They reach nearly full size after only seven weeks. Cool fact about peregrine falcons: They are among the fastest birds, flying at up to 55 mph and diving at more than 200 mph when striking avian prey in mid-air. Photo by National Park Service.

You never know what you are going to see on America’s public lands. Case in point: This photo from Big Bend National Park in Texas. A mother bobcat perches in a mesquite tree with her large juvenile kittens, teaching them the ropes of feline life in the wilderness. An employee captured this shot not too far from a park road. This family group was likely hunting from the tree where they would have a good view of passing rodents. But maybe they were just enjoying the view! Photo by Big Bend Natural History Association. 😺😺😺