public land

Some cleared roads in Yellowstone National Park opened for bicyclists this week. Work continues to open major routes to cars by April 21. Soon, millions of people will visit the park to enjoy its amazing natural wonders. Just remember, bison always have the right of way. Photo by National Park Service.

Wildflowers carpet the hillside at Gila Box Riparian National Conservation Area. The 23,000-acre area is truly an oasis in the desert with four perennial waterways that are the lifeline for this remarkable place. The Gila River canyon section, known as the Gila Box, is composed of patchy mesquite woodlands, mature cottonwoods, sandy beaches and grand buff-colored cliffs. Bonita Creek – popular for birdwatching, hiking and picnicking – is lined with large cottonwoods, sycamores and willows. Cliff dwellings, historic homesteads, Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep and over 200 species of birds make this year-round watery Arizona spot worth the drive. Photo by @mypubliclands.

anonymous asked:

This is going to sound like a stupid question, but it seems like most of your campsites are literally just in the middle of no where, not like at a legit camping ground. Is that necessarily legal? Asking because I'm real inspired to try something like this myself

This is not a dumb question at all - and perfectly relevant to our current fight to protect our public lands.  I can legally camp in the middle of nowhere because I do so on public lands - lands owned by all American Citizens.  This is land set aside for public use - be it camping, hunting, fishing, biking, climbing, hiking, etc…  Public Lands are owned and supported by tax payers and also sometimes referred to as Federal Land (most research shows public land costs about $4 dollars per tax payer a year).  Restrictions depend on the agency that manages the area - Forest Service Land, for example, does not allow mountain biking while most BLM (Bureau of Land Management) land has very few restrictions and allows for camping almost anywhere (without the need for a campground).  However, I strongly encourage Leave No Trace ethics when camping in wilderness and if you are going to camp on our public lands please go to the following link and read the 7 Leave No Trace Principles:

 https://lnt.org/learn/7-principles 

I prefer to camp in the wild - to leave the city behind and experience the outdoors as a refuge from human impact - and in order to continue to experience it as such we need to keep it looking as if we were never there.  I am a climber, a hunter, a mountaineer, a fisher, a hiker, a biker, and most importantly I was lucky enough to be born in the USA which gives me access to public wilderness as if I had the money to own a cabin in the mountains.  However, I don’t have the money to own a cabin and so when the weekend rolls around I throw a few things in the back of the Land Cruiser and head for public lands… I find a spot that is my own, that feels as if I am one of the few lucky enough to sit on this rock and watch the sun go down - and I am lucky.  

Watch the video link below:  4 minute bipartisan history of how the USA came to have so much public federal land, specifically in the west.  This video educated me on how almost all federal land has always been federal land - and is not land that was taken from the states:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rC_mnRu-4gA

It is my opinion that there is falsehood in state legislator’s desire to want public lands to be taken from the federal government and given to the state for the resident’s interests.  Federal land is held in a trust for the use of the American people -  and that’s it, that’s all, it is there for our future generations - so that I can teach my kid to ethically hunt and camp in the mountains just as my grandfather and father taught me.  Some states do a great job with land they manage for public access, but the problem is that the land is no longer explicitly a trust and if the wrong individuals become elected, or are already are elected, that land can now be sold to private entities and will no longer be accessible to the public.  This is not to say it WILL but that it CAN… but I would rather not risk the possibility of my land being sold off so that I can not use it.  Historically this has occurred when a state’s budget isn’t balanced because it is pretty easy to sell of a chunk of land to compensate for debt.  

Please vote to protect our public lands! 

Public lands for our use and what agency manages them can be seen in the map below: 


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I am withdrawing HR 621. I’m a proud gun owner, hunter and love our public lands. The bill would have disposed of small parcels of lands Pres. Clinton identified as serving no public purpose but groups I support and care about fear it sends the wrong message. The bill was originally introduced several years ago. I look forward to working with you. I hear you and HR 621 dies tomorrow. 

In case anyone was worried about the 3+ million acres of public land the government wanted to sell off. This would have impacted archaeological sites if the sale went through

You never know what you are going to see on America’s public lands. Case in point: This photo from Big Bend National Park in Texas. A mother bobcat perches in a mesquite tree with her large juvenile kittens, teaching them the ropes of feline life in the wilderness. An employee captured this shot not too far from a park road. This family group was likely hunting from the tree where they would have a good view of passing rodents. But maybe they were just enjoying the view! Photo by Big Bend Natural History Association. 😺😺😺

4

Public Lands/ Exploration/ Night Sky/ 

Searching for a meteor burst last night in the Bald Hills above Redwood creek in Redwood National Park.  

I had visions of a Meteor burst behind this fire tower, if you zoom in a few images have a faint line or two, but overall every time I would place and focus the lens the meteors would then show up in a different part of the sky.

*note on editing:
I find it difficult to edit night photos. It’s a tough call between taking all of the amazing colors the long exposure captures, and trying to portray the scene more closely to the way I experienced it. I always find that to my eyes it looks more silvery blue, but the camera often finds many colors. Last nights photos out of camera had amazing greens, purple and blue which to people viewing the photos might be more interesting. But that’s not how it felt to be there alone in the dark walking in starlight.  Maybe I’ll share an alternate edit at another time.

2

Park officials speak out against promposal graffiti in Santa Monica national park

  • In a Thursday post on the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area’s Facebook page, a park official wrote that park rangers had found a prom invitation — or “promposal” — graffitied on the public lands.
  • “We love hearing about creative promposals, but damaging public lands is not the way to do it,” “Ranger Zach” wrote in the post.
  • Not only is the graffiti an eye sore for guests, the spray paint can potentially harm nearby ecosystems. Read more (5/26/17)

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Canyonlands National Park sits under the desert sun nearly every day, but in the early morning hours when the air is cool and the sun is rising, a majestic glow of indigo filled this Utah valley with mist. The iconic Airport Tower can be seen in the distance, standing just behind the Washer Woman Arch. Photo courtesy of Sam Koerbel. 

Sequoia National Park is the land of giants with huge mountains, deep canyons and the world’s largest trees. It can be hard to appreciate the size of the giant sequoias – the largest are as tall as an average 26-story building, and their diameters at the base exceed the width of many city streets. Explore this special place and all other public lands with free entrance on Monday for Presidents’ Day. Photo by Volunteer-in-Parks Hal Gamble.

Located in northern California, Lassen Volcanic National Park is a true winter wonderland. Silent, snow-covered volcanoes hide magma beneath their calm surfaces – clues to the area’s three million years of volcanic activity show up in steam vents, boiling springs and bubbling mudpots. Even in winter, these hydrothermal (“hot water”) features melt nearby snow and ice. Photo by Mike Matiasek, National Park Service.

Many Glacier is considered the heart of Glacier National Park in Montana. Massive mountains, active glaciers, sparkling lakes, hiking trails and abundant wildlife make this a favorite of visitors and locals alike. Photo from last summer at Swiftcurrent Lake courtesy of Tiffany Nguyen.