public broadcasting funding

Anyway, on a more serious note, it worries me sincerely that a large number of you seem to not know much about Canada and Canadian politics. Here’s a summary of some Canadian news outlets and Tumblr blogs that you might want to follow so that you can avoid having to send asks like these ones, as well as avoid other commonly held but blatantly false stereotypes abt Canada:

- @allthecanadianpolitics
- @fycanadianpolitics
- @canadavotes

Some news outlets include:

- CBC (Canada’s publically funded broadcaster)
- The Globe and Mail (just stay as far away as possible from anything written by Margaret Wente)
- ricochet.media
- rabble.ca
- The Montreal Gazette
- The Toronto Star

Approach the National Post with caution, and stay as far away from Rebel media as you possibly can.

And before any of you say anything: yes, there is racism in Canada. There is anti-blackness. There’s a fairly upbeat neo-Nazi movement that’s been making strides ever since the election in America. The RCMP is garbage. Police brutality is very real, and has killed people, mostly POC, most of whom are black or First Nations. Justin Trudeau is not your bro, nor is he the person who you can trust to stand up to Trump. The Conservatives are a flaming pile of garbage. The health care is free, but it needs a shitton of overhaul (and has its fair share of detractors who want to stop federal funding for it entirely–fucking looking at you Maxime Bernier). Just because abortion is legal in all of the provinces doesn’t mean the quality of care provided is equal. Also Justin Trudeau sucks. And yes, we have antifa too.

- Mod A

latimes.com
'There is no Plan B' for public broadcasting without federal funding, PBS president says
PBS president and CEO Paula Kerger wasn't pulling any punches Sunday at the Television Critics Assn. summer press tour in Beverly Hills...
By Libby Hill

Libby Hill at LA Times:

PBS president and CEO Paula Kerger wasn’t pulling any punches Sunday at the Television Critics Assn. summer press tour in Beverly Hills.

“When people say, ‘What is the Plan B for [loss of federal funding]?’ There is no Plan B for that,” Kerger said of the potential budget crisis public broadcasting faces under the Trump administration.

The Corporation for Public Broadcasting has been under fire for months, with President Trump’s proposed budget axing the institution’s $450 million budget.

Though it’s easy to suggest that budget cuts would threaten Big Bird’s livelihood, the true victims of defunding would be far more human.

Kerger explained that of PBS’ $450 million budget, one-third goes to radio. Of the television budget, most goes to community service grants, that local stations use for up to 50% of their operating budget.

“PBS itself will not go away. But a number of our stations will. If you are a station for whom 30 or 40 or 50% of your funding is suddenly pulled away, there’s no way you can make up that money,” Kerger said. “You will find big parts of the country that will suddenly be without public broadcasting.”

The fate of public broadcasting is currently in flux, waiting for the end of Congress’ August recess for resolution. Currently, the House Appropriations Committee has approved the bulk of the PBS budget, while the House Budget Committee recommended doing away with funding altogether.

ATTENTION US SHERLOCK FANS

By now, news has broke that Sherlock is showing in theaters in the U.S. on January 5th and 6th. (If you haven’t heard, I’m on mobile so I can’t link it, but just google “Big Sherlock announcement by PBS” and it will come up).

BUT

Even if you plan on going to a showing, and/or

Even if you plan on watching Sherlock online through the BBC (however that might happen)

BE SURE TO STILL WATCH IT WHEN IT AIRS ON PBS ON JANUARY 1.

Seriously, I don’t care if you have it on for background noise, just have it on

Public broadcasting is funded in part by the government, and a really good reason to cut funds to a governmentally funded program is if no one is using it.

It’s great that it’s in theaters, but if that means no one watches it when it airs, there’s a chance that 1) nothing PBS co-produces will ever be shown in theaters again and 2) if PBS can’t convert a large audience into decent numbers, it could have a detrimental effect to its budget (part of which goes to producing Sherlock).

It’s important to support PBS, so PBS can keep making this and other great things (a world without Sherlock or Antiques Roadshow is not one I want to live in).

This has been a PSA

anonymous asked:

Hello, I have a quick question about GBBO, if you don't mind answering it! I'm an American, and I don't really understand the significance of the channel switch from BBC1 to Channel 4, can you explain? I saw the news break, but thought nothing of it until Mel and Sue announced they were leaving! (SO sad about it)

Hi, not at all! Basically, the BBC is a public service broadcaster funded by the television license fee, whereas Channel 4 is a commercial broadcaster so it gets money from adverts etc. (Which is why the BBC can’t show a specific brand of flour or sugar or whatever, and explains that lovely lovely lovely post about Mel and Sue placing things with obvious logos in the shot when the bakers get really upset.) GBBO is produced by Love Productions, who asked the BBC for way more money for the rights to it than they could afford - I think the final figures were something like a £15 million offer from the BBC, but Love Productions said that they wouldn’t settle for less than £25 million. The BBC just couldn’t afford that, Channel 4 could, so Love Productions went with them, which has annoyed a lot of people because it just comes across that Love Productions are being a bit greedy and are only in it for the money. Mel and Sue basically said as much when they said in their statement that they wouldn’t “follow the dough” and pointed out that the BBC took the risk by first starting out with the show not knowing if it would fail, but now it’s become massively popular, the makers are willing to sell out to the highest bidder with no regard for that initial risk. 

It’s all a bit of a disaster really, but the one good thing to come from the whole situation is that you can love Mel and Sue EVEN MORE because they have shown loyalty and integrity and whatnot and are not prepared to have their mouths stuffed with cash. Holding out hope that Paul and Mary do the same…