ptsbrushes

2

here’s part two of my brush settings list!!! (part one here)

Note for marker tool for the drawr brushes, i sometimes use it for coloring too, but feel free to experiment with them however you like!

Also guys I recently posted my first full coloring speed paint video here ;v; check it out if you’re interested in seeing how i color things lol// subs and likes would greatly appreciated <3 (i still don’t know how to enable comments OTL)

anonymous asked:

do you have any tips for painting textures? all of the things i paint look rubbery, even when i try to make them look like steel or plastic

Well, assuming you’re working digitally that will partially be down to it being digital.

Digital art is naturally very smooth, which can cause problems when trying to paint texture. I’d look into natural media brushsets, digitalbrushes​ and ptsbrushes​ are a good place to look.


But most importantly - it’s down to how light affects different textures!

I would highly recommend reading androidart’s tutorial, here’s a couple bits from it:

There’s really just one kind of light. It bounces. You can only see the light (photon) if it enters your eye.

Light does two important things when it hits a surface.

First, a part of it is absorbed. This is how colors are made. A red apple reflects mostly red wavelengths, the rest are absorbed and turned into heat or something. That’s why black stuff get so hot in the sun.

Anyways, the reflected light bounce away differently depending on the surface. If the surface is bumpy it will bounce away sort of randomly, like a tennis ball that hits rocky terrain.

If the surface is smooth it will bounce away in a predictable path. A mirror is very smooth so the light comes back undistorted, so we can see our reflection.

Note that all surfaces have speculars, because speculars is just reflected light. It’s just more broken up/diluted on dull surfaces.

Here’s an example of various materials and how i render them.

  • Cloth - Hardly any speculars, just shadow and light. Sometimes strong light can penetrate thin cloth and cause some sort of subsurface scattering.
  • Leather - Can be a little gloss and thus have a few speculars. Also, don’t make it too saturated.
  • Trees and wood - Dull. Not very saturated either (sort of grey-brown-sienna).
  • Stone - A bit like cloth. The surface is often to rugged (both at micro and macro levels) to have any serious speculars.
  • Plastic - It seems like the speculars and reflections are colorized in the color of the plastic. Plastic can also be a bit transparent.
  • Gold - Gold isn’t orange. I use black - desaturated orange sometims with hints of green, then up to yellow and white.
  • Silver - More or less like a mirror.
  • Metal - In the case of armours I often push the values a little more, not as much midtones.
  • Brushed metal - It’s sort of like an inbetween of a grey surface and a silver surface.
  • Glass - Often just transparent with distortion. The speculars come suddenly and are often white. In the case of car windows you might have noticed that it’s easier ot see what’s behind if there’s a shadow over the window. The brighter reflections obscure.
  • Wet stuff - more speculars, can become transparent in the case of cloth, and stones get more saturated and pronounced details.