psychology jobs

Career based on astrology (Part 7)

Click here for: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 |
Part 7 |

Psychiatrist / Psychologist


•Sun in Pisces, Aquarius, Gemini, Sagittarius, Scorpio, Capricorn 


•Moon in Pisces, Leo, Aries, Scorpio, Cancer, Gemini, Aquarius


•Mercury in Gemeni, Aquarius, Libra, Pisces, Scorpio, Gemini, Virgo 

•Venus in Capricorn, Aquarius, Scorpio, Virgo, Taurus, Leo 

•Mars in Gemini, Aquarius, Libra, Capricorn, Virgo, Pisces, Scorpio


•Jupiter in Pisces, Scorpio, Cancer, Virgo, Gemini, Aquarius, Libra


•Saturn in Scorpio, Cancer, Pisces, Gemini •Mars in positive aspect to Saturn 

•Moon / Neptune / Pluto in first, fourth, eighth, tenth or twelfth house
•Mercury in the twelfth house


•Moon / Neptune / Mercury in the seventh house

•Pallas in Pisces, Scorpio, Cancer, Gemini, Aquarius


•Virgo, Capricorn, Pisces, Cancer, Scorpio, Aquarius, Gemini, Sagittarius Rising


•Pisces, Scorpio, Gemeni, Aquarius Midheaven


•Neptune / Moon / Mercury / Saturn / Ascendant conjunct Pluto


•Pluto in positive aspect to Ascendant/ Sun / Moon / Mercury / Mars / Saturn


•Scorpio, Pisces, Gemini dominance


•Water or air dominance


•Dominant seventh, eighth, ninth, twelfth house


•Eighth or twelfth house stellium 

•Mercur/Neptun Midpoint conjunct MC

10 Popular Jobs in Psychology

1. Career or Vocational Counselor 

Average Salary: $46,000

Due to the rapidly changing job market, many people are searching for a new job in their chosen field or even changing careers. Career counselors help individuals make career decisions and utilize tools including personality assessments, interest inventories and other evaluation measures. They often start by looking at a client’s interests, job history, education, skills and personality characteristics in order to determine which careers are a good match. They also help clients work on building skills, practicing interviews, improving resumes and locating job openings. Assisting clients who are dealing with job loss or employment-related stress is also common.

Keep reading

Successful Interview Tips

1. Before applying for a job, find out as much as you can about it – and make sure it’s something you want to do!

2. Also, find out what you can about the interviewers. For example, what are their names and job titles? What other jobs have they done in the past? You can often uncover a lot of information by simply googling peoples’ names and positions.

3. Try and find out about the company’s normal interviewing style. For example, is it likely to be one-on-one interview, or will you be interviewed by a couple of people, or will there be an interview panel? Also, will you be required to sit any kinds of test (general knowledge, case studies, IQ tests etc.)?

4. If possible, connect with others who have undergone a similar interview. Ask them for tips and ideas – or things to watch out for, or how best to prepare.

5. Research the company. It’s important to know as much as possible about the company’s history, what is does now, it’s plans for the future – and the expectations associated with the job.

6. Be clear about what you have to offer the company. It’s important that you match their needs to your experience, abilities and personality. Practise selling yourself to them!

7. If possible, rehearse the interview with a friend.

8. Pay attention to your appearance. Dress appropriately (err on the side of dressing conservatively); make sure you look tidy and smart; brush your hair and teeth; wear perfume or aftershave (but not so much that it’s overpowering).

9. Check out the direction is advance (if necessary drive there the day before to ensure you don’t get lost). Arrive 5 minutes early for the interview.

10. Be confident, respectful, polite, truthful, positive and enthusiastic. Think carefully before you respond – use proper grammar, and don’t speak too quickly.

anonymous asked:

What are some jobs you could do with a degree In sociology or psychology?

Sociology  (Undergraduate Degree) 
Here is a HUGE & HELPFUL list of career options for sociology majors.

Psychology (Undergraduate Degree)
Advertising agent
Psychiatric technician
Career counselor
Probation and parole officer
Writer
Market researcher
Child care worker
Laboratory assistant
Social service specialist

For more info check out: 
How to find a job with an undergraduate degree in psychology


If you are going for a Graduate Degree check out this article:
The 5 Highest Paying Jobs You Can Get With A Psychology Degree

When you want to read Andromeda spoilers and use your hype to write pre-release fan fic, but you have to write a paper on how the stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle impacts rats’ lever pressing instead.

Originally posted by spacetool

anonymous asked:

Hi! I want to study clinical psychology in college and eventually become a psychologist or therapist. My parents are worried about me being able to find a job, but I have a passion for this field. Any advice?

hi anon,

There are lots of jobs in psychology and clinical work. however- many of those jobs are in less desirable places (I recently saw a listing for a job in North Dakota, for example), may not fit the picture of what you’re envisioning doing or where you’re envisioning working, and may not pay what you’re expecting. If your heart is set on working in private practice with a beautiful office and a great view in downtown LA, serving nice, smart people who get better in 8-10 weeks- you should have a rethink. There are jobs like that, but they are rare. It’s more likely you’ll work for a community mental health center in a dingy building that hasn’t been updated since the 70′s, with clients with chronic issues who often don’t like or trust you. This career can be wonderful, and I completely encourage you to pursue it if this is where your heart is, but I want you to have a clear understanding of what you’re pursuing. You don’t need to commit now- you can major in clinical psych in college and see if it’s really what you want. Good luck!  

Successful Interviewing Tips

1. Before applying for a job, find out as much as you can about it – and make sure it’s something you want to do!

2. Also, find out what you can about the interviewers. For example, what are their names and job titles? What other jobs have they done in the past? You can often uncover a lot of information by simply googling peoples’ names and positions.

3. Try and find out about the company’s normal interviewing style. For example, is it likely to be one-on-one interview, or will you be interviewed by a couple of people, or will there be an interview panel? Also, will you be required to sit any kinds of test (general knowledge, case studies, IQ tests etc.)?

4. If possible, connect with others who have undergone a similar interview. Ask them for tips and ideas – or things to watch out for, or how best to prepare.

5. Research the company. It’s important to know as much as possible about the company’s history, what it does now, it’s plans for the future – and the expectations associated with the job.

6. Be clear about what you have to offer the company. It’s important that you match their needs to your experience, abilities and personality. Practising selling yourself to them!

7. If possible, rehearse the interview with a friend.

8. Pay attention to your appearance. Dress appropriately (err on the side of dressing conservatively); make sure you look tidy and smart; brush your hair and teeth; wear perfume or aftershave (but not so much that it’s overpowering).

9. Check out the directions is advance (if necessary drive there the day before to make sure you don’t get lost). Arrive 5 minutes early for the interview.

10. Be confident, respectful, polite, truthful, positive and enthusiastic. Think carefully before you respond – use proper grammar, and don’t speak too quickly.

Successful Interview Tips

1. Before applying for a job, find out as much as you can about it – and make sure it’s something you want to do!

2. Also, find out what you can about the interviewers. For example, what are their names and job titles? What other jobs have they done in the past? You can often uncover a lot of information by simply googling peoples’ names and positions.

3. Try and find out about the company’s normal interviewing style. For example, is it likely to be one-on-one interview, or will you be interviewed by a couple of people, or will there be an interview panel? Also, will you be required to sit any kinds of test (general knowledge, case studies, IQ tests etc.)?

4. If possible, connect with others who have undergone a similar interview. Ask them for tips and ideas – or things to watch out for, or how best to prepare.

5. Research the company. It’s important to know as much as possible about the company’s history, what is does now, it’s plans for the future – and the expectations associated with the job.

6. Be clear about what you have to offer the company. It’s important that you match their needs to your experience, abilities and personality. Practise selling yourself to them!

7. If possible, rehearse the interview with a friend.

8. Pay attention to your appearance. Dress appropriately (err on the side of dressing conservatively); make sure you look tidy and smart; brush your hair and teeth; wear perfume or aftershave (but not so much that it’s overpowering).

9. Check out the direction is advance (if necessary drive there the day before to ensure you don’t get lost). Arrive 5 minutes early for the interview.

10. Be confident, respectful, polite, truthful, positive and enthusiastic. Think carefully before you respond – use proper grammar, and don’t speak too quickly.

youtube

Going through the pros and cons of being a therapist was actually a good exercise for me! It helped me make sure I am still doing what I love and that the pros outweigh the cons. Hooray I still love what I do and my pros really outweigh my cons!

Cons:
We don’t make a lot of money, we work odd hours in order to accommodate our clients, we have to take care of ourselves regularly! I know it isn’t a real con, but it’s definitely something we need to take into consideration prior to becoming a mental health professional.

Pros:
It is so incredibly rewarding to see your clients grow into the person you knew they could be, and being there during that time is just amazing. The second pro is that the work is actually fulfilling! I get to help people and ever after a long day of work, I feel good and like I have helped out in some way. The third is that the work always changes. Each week, each hour with people is different, so I don’t ever get bored or annoyed with what I do. The fourth and final pro I will talk about today is that it is always a challenge! Not only do my clients challenge me to learn more, figure out more about their issues or concerns, but each and every one of you challenges me to be a better therapist. I hope you found this helpful and please share! xox