psychology fact

fun fact: procrastination happens to animals too. it’s a naturall thing.

animal equivalents for scrolling tumblr include:
 - hamsters starting to wash their faces in inaproppriate situations
 - hyenas stopping everything and starting to dig holes in the ground.
 - seagulls starting to ruffle their feathers instead of doing important things

this happens for two reasons: 

1) an animal is in the situation where none of the standard scenarious it has are fitting, so it does the next best thing 
(example: hamsters were put in a vibrating bowl, they couldn’t run or attack, so in about a minute they stopped everything and started washing their faces.)

2) an animal has two conflicting instincts fighting for dominance, so the third one, usualy suppressed by them, kicks in.
(example: when two hyenas meet at the border of their territories, they have an instinct to protect their own territory conflict with an instinct not to cross someone else’s. they don’t know if they need to attack or leave, so both start digging holes in the ground.
example: a seagull sitting on the nest needs to protect her children, but also has to go get some food. instead a seagull settles for ruffling her feathers for two hours.)

with humans it’s usually the second reason.
(example: I’m tired and I want to go to sleep, but I should write an essay for tomorrow. both these things are important, so I’m procrastinating them by writing this post.)

nature is beautiful.
I’m gonna go to sleep now.

One thing that really gets me about today’s society is how emotional/psychological child abuse is normalized and even celebrated.

I’ve noticed a phenomenon of parents getting together and talking about how they’re such a Mean Mom or Mean Dad and how they’re raising their children to be respectful. They talk about destroying their children’s possessions, isolating them, humiliating them, and/or publicly shaming them.

And when these people hear about, say, a parent smashing a kid’s phone for not cleaning their room or burning their possessions or filming a punishment or embarrassing moment and putting it up on social media, they commend the parents for “teaching the kids a lesson”.

Why the fuck do we, as a society, think this is okay?

It doesn’t teach kids valuable life lessons, it teaches them to be scared of repercussions. It’s bullying and child abuse and for some reason, people think that’s commendable.

Whenever I hear people saying “haha I bet that 14 year old learned a lesson”, it instantly makes me suspicious of them. I will instantly think of you as either a potential child abuser or a child abuse enabler.

As a survivor of psychological abuse, people dismissing this behavior as “harmless life lessons” makes me wonder if it really was abuse. If I deserved it. If I really deserved to have my pet’s life threatened because I was a liar.

It’s not cute. It’s not “good parenting”. It’s intimidating, shaming, and traumatizing your child into compliance.

‘Ambivert’

I’m both: introvert and extrovert .

I like people, but I need to be alone.
I’ll go out, vibe and meet new people
but it has an expiration because I have to recharge. If I don’t find the
valuable alone time I need to
recharge I cannot be my highest self.

Are You Dissociating?

“Dissociating is one of the most common responses to abuse and trauma. It involves feeling numb, detached or unreal and (while it happens to everyone once in a while) is experienced more frequently and severely in survivors. Dissociating people vary widely in symptoms and may experience any or all of the things from the following list.

You may be dissociating if you:

• find yourself staring at one spot, not thinking anything
• feel completely numb
• feel like you’re not really in your body, like you’re watching yourself in a movie.
• feel suddenly lightheaded or dizzy
• lose the plot of the show or conversation you were focused on
• feel as if you’re not quite real, like you’re in a dream
• feel like you’re floating
• suddenly feel like you’re not a part of the world around you
• feel detached and far away from other people, who may seem mechanical or unreal to you
• are very startled when someone/something gets your attention
completely forget what you were thinking just a moment ago
• suddenly cover your face or react as if you’re about to be hurt for no reason
• can’t remember important information about yourself, like your age or where you live
• find yourself rocking back and forth
• become very focused on a small or trivial object or event
• find that voices, sounds or writing seem far away and you sometimes have trouble understanding them.
• feel as if you’ve just experienced a flashback (perhaps rapidly) but you can’t remember anything about it.
• perceive your body as foreign or not belonging to you”

A Collection Of Books By Neurologist Oliver Sacks

If you’re interested in neuroscience or psychology, I’d highly reccomend any book by Oliver Sacks! I get asked a lot about books to read so you can also check out this video I made with my top 7 and this masterpost which includes websites where you can learn more!

1. Migrane

For centuries, physicians have been fascinated by the many manifestations of migraine, and especially by the visual hallucinations or auras- similar in some ways to those induced by hallucinogenic drugs or deliria–which often precede a migraine. Dr. Sacks describes these hallucinatory constants, and what they reveal about the working of the brain. 

2. Awakenings

Awakenings is the remarkable account of a group of patients who contracted sleeping-sickness during the great epidemic just after World War I. Frozen in a decades-long sleep, these men and women were given up as hopeless until 1969, when Dr. Sacks gave them the then-new drug L-DOPA, which had an astonishing, explosive, “awakening” effect. Dr. Sacks recounts the moving case histories of these individuals, the stories of their lives, and the extraordinary transformations they underwent with treatment.

3. The Island of The Color Blind

Oliver Sacks has always been fascinated by islands, and this book is an account of his work with an isolated community of islanders born totally colorblind.  He listens to these achromatopic islanders describe their colorless world in rich terms of pattern and tone, luminance and shadow.

4. Uncle Tungsten

A book about Sacks’ childood;  his discovery of biology, his departure from his childhood love of chemistry and, at age 14, a new understanding that he would become a doctor.

5. An Anthropologist on Mars

This book talks about 7 seemingly paradoxical neurological conditions: including a surgeon consumed by the compulsive tics of Tourette’s Syndrome except when he is operating; an artist who loses all sense of color in a car accident, but finds a new sensibility and creative power in black and white; and an autistic professor who has great difficulty deciphering the simplest social exchange between humans, but has built a career out of her intuitive understanding of animal behavior. 

6.  Seeing Voices

 A journey into the world of deaf culture, and the neurological and social underpinnings of the remarkable visual language of the congenitally deaf. Sacks writes “The existence of a visual language, Sign, and the visual intelligence that goes with its acquisition, shows us that the brain is rich in potentials we would scarcely have guessed of, shows us the almost unlimited resource of the human organism when it is faced with the new and must adapt.”

I’ve noticed something about people who make a difference in the world: They hold the unshakable conviction that individuals are extremely important, that every life matters. They get excited over one smile. They are willing to feed one stomach, educate one mind, and treat one wound. They aren’t determined to revolutionize the world all at once; they’re satisfied with small changes. Over time, though, the small changes add up. Sometimes they even transform cities and nations, and yes, the world.
—  Beth Clark

It turns out that there’s actually a scientific reason behind why people don’t sleep soundly in an unfamiliar place. 

 According to a study conducted by Brown University, the first night that you sleep in a new environment the left hemisphere of the brain stays alert while the right hemisphere rests. The biological trait is thought to have allowed early humans to respond to nighttime threats. “When we’re sleeping in a new environment and we don’t know how many predators are around, it would make sense to keep half the brain more alert and more responsive to bumps in the night,” said Niels Rattenborg, who led the study. 

The evolutionary advantage this brain traits provides is probably less useful to modern humans — making us experience less restful sleep when we spend the night at a hotel or friend’s house, for example — but in the animal kingdom, this trait still helps marine mammals such as dolphins, whales, and seals respond to threats during their slumber.