psychological-projection

Wilson aired a series of stereotypes that pluralized Michael Brown. In the Renisha McBride case, Theodore Wafer, who was convicted in her killing, kept saying “them,” kept talking about “them.” It was them versus me, and I was terrified.

There was that stereotyped plural in everything he said. He was describing not even a human being, he was describing a terrifying shape onto which all kinds of historical fear [about the black body] were projected.

Dehumanizing. Beastializing. Cartooning. That’s precisely the danger of prejudice and stereotypes. That you don’t see the human being in front of you, you see a template, a projection, a hallucination of your worst fears that makes the fear greater than the situation that you’re actually in.

1) You won’t be in love with the boy who takes your first kiss.
That’s okay.
2) Your mom might not approve of the boy you want to be with.
Listen to her. She’s probably right.
3) Your stomach will flip and your heart will skip when his tongue traces your lips.
Nothing will ever replicate that.
4) Don’t cry after kissing your first girl.
She was probably scared too.
5) Your first time probably won’t be your wedding night.
You’re still a good person.
6) Being single is okay, really.
Your partner should enhance your personality, not define your character.
7) At times, more often than not, you will feel unloved and unwanted.
Remember that you’re important. No one determines your worth but you.
8) Learn to sleep on both sides of the bed.
The first night without them by your side will be 1% easier.
9) If he hits you, leave him.
Even if you love him. Especially if you love him.
10) Women abuse men, too.
Hitting him is not okay.
11) A lot of your friends are probably in the closet right now.
When they tell you they’re gay, be surprised and be supportive.
12) No one ‘stole’ your partner.
They wouldn’t have left if they didn’t want to.
13) Friends usually won’t last forever.
Sorry.
14) If your friends don’t approve of him, it’s okay.
They’ll still love you anyway.
15) People in high school don’t seem to understand value.
You’re worth it, whether they see it or not.
16) Not everyone deserves a second chance.
Don’t give it to them.
17) Liquor won’t help.
It will only make the absence burn more.
18) She will tell her friends the details of big and little things.
The story of your first kiss together will not be private.
19) Always assume her girlfriends know everything, and expect them to share their opinions.
Don’t get angry at her.
20) Contrary to popular belief, he probably won’t tell his friends everything.
Expect it anyway.
21) Never let a crush ruin a fantastic friendship.
The relationship probably won’t end well and you will lose your best friend.
22) Have separate interests to escape into but always have something in common.
Things get boring otherwise.
23) If he loves you, he has to love your friends too.
They’re a part of you.
24) Trust each other around your preferred gender.
They probably aren’t cheating.
25) Sex is not shameful.
It’s not something everyone should hear about, either.
26) Know the difference between flirting and blatantly provoking.
Stay classy.
27) He won’t answer every 2am phone call.
Forgive him. He still loves you.
28) When he says he loves you,
believe him.
29) Don’t come to school in sweats the day after he leaves you.
Show him you’re better off without him.
30) It won’t always hurt.
Life DOES go on.
— 

30 Things My Mother Should Have Taught Me Before High School ((10.19.14 - 9:35pm))

thesoulpages // (c.n.p)

reason.com
Study Finds: Studies Are Wrong
A major project to reproduce study results from psychology journals found that more than half could not be replicated.

One of the bedrock assumptions of science is that for a study’s results to be valid, other researchers should be able to reproduce the study and reach the same conclusions. The ability to successfully reproduce a study and find the same results is, as much as anything, how we know that its findings are true, rather than a one-off result.

This seems obvious, but in practice, a lot more work goes into original studies designed to create interesting conclusions than into the rather less interesting work of reproducing studies that have already been done to see whether their results hold up.

That’s why efforts like the Reproducibility Project, which attempted to retest findings from 100 studies in three top-tier psychology journals, are so important. As it turns out, findings from the majority of the studies the project attempted to redo could not be reproduced. The New York Times reports on the new study’s findings:

Now, a painstaking yearslong effort to reproduce 100 studies published in three leading psychology journals has found that more than half of the findings did not hold up when retested. The analysis was done by research psychologists, many of whom volunteered their time to double-check what they considered important work. Their conclusions, reported Thursday in the journal Science, have confirmed the worst fears of scientists who have long worried that the field needed a strong correction.

This is a serious problem for psychology, and for social science more broadly. And it’s one that, as the Times points out, observers in and around the field have been increasingly worried about for some time.

For My Psychology Project

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The signs as 2015 boy groups debuts

Aries: Road Boyz

Taurus: Monsta X

Gemini: Seventeen

Cancer: Romeo

Leo: Up10tion

Virgo: HeartB

Libra: Snuper

Scorpio: M.A.P6

Sagittarius: iKON

Capricorn: DAY6

Aquarius: A6P

Pisces: N.Flying