For people who suffer with physical disabilities, wishing to be able-bodied is often a huge desire. However, there is a rare and controversial mental disorder called Body Integrity Identity Disorder (BIID) where the sufferer strongly desires to become disabled, in one way or another. One such case involves a woman called Jewel Schuping, who claims she had a lifelong dream of becoming blind.

“When I was five my mom would find me walking around the halls with my eyes closed. I have just always felt comfortable without any real vision”. It didn’t stop there: When her mother gave her the usual warning that staring at the sun would make her go blind, Jewel said she would spend hours doing so. As a teenager, Jewel would walk around with blacked out sunglasses and a white cane in order to fully immerse herself into her bizarre fantasy. By the age of 20, she had become fluent in braille after studying it for 2 years. 

In 2006, she met with a psychologist who agreed to help her fulfil her lifelong dream. Over the course of six months, he began inserting eyedrops laced with drain-cleaner into his patients’ eyes. Eventually, her eyesight diminished to nothing, with her left eye suffering a “corneal meltdown” by collapsing on itself and having to be removed - while her right eye developed glaucoma and cataracts, and a webbing of scars.Her furious family have disowned her after she initially told them it was an accident - but she insists she has no regrets.

Falling in Love!!

Hello, brain people!

Love!! What on earth happens to your brain as you fall in love? There are three stages that we all go through as we fall in love with that special somebody: Lust, Attraction, Attachment

During Lust, sex hormones are released - this being oestrogen and testosterone in women and men respectively.

Throughout Attraction, you feel all wonderful and love-stricken! You can’t think of anything other than that special somebody. There are three main neurotransmitters that are involved in this stage, with each type acting within a specific pathway in the brain. These neurotransmitters are: Adrenaline (Epinephrine), Dopamine, and Serotonin.

Epinephrine is released during your body’s “stress response”, making your blood levels of adrenaline and cortisol increase. This means that even meeting with that somebody can make your heart race, as you also start to sweat. How lovely!

Dopamine is closely related to our brain’s “appetite system”, the system that is active whilst we are craving something. Dopamine stimulates “desire and reward”, and does this by triggering a rush of pleasure! This has a very similar affect to cocaine on the brain! Love is a drug!

Serotonin is an anti-depressant, and may also explain why, when falling in love, your love stays on your mind.

Finally, we have attachment! This is the tight bond that keeps couples together long enough for them to raise children. Yet again, we have chemicals to thank for this! These are: oxytocin and vasopressin.

Oxytocin, the cuddle hormone :), is a very powerful hormone released by men and women during orgasm, and is said to deepen the feelings of attachment between the couple, making them feel much closer to each other. As the theory goes, the more sex that the couple has, the deeper the connection they feel for one another. Sounds good to me! :) 

Vasopressin is an anti-diuretic hormone that works with your kidneys to control thirst. Although little is known about the affects of this hormone, when male prairie voles were given a drug that suppresses the effect of vasopressin, the bond with their partner fell apart immediately, as he then would fail to protect his partner.

So go out there! Bump into a complete stranger, tell them about yourself, and fall in love! :)

OCD things:
  • you never know if an intrusive thought will pass for just a minute or it will have a 4-month stay in your head.
  • you know your fears are irrational but yet you don’t because they just feel too real.
  • feeling guilty when you get a disgusting thought even though you know it’s out of your control but you feel like you’ll be an awful person if you don’t feel guilt over letting something so awful in your head.
  • being scared of being scared.
  • feeling like you won’t be able to go on with your life normally after a certain thought.
  • wanting to speak to someone but yet feeling too ashamed to speak up or you know that the fear is too idiotic.
  • when people think that OCD is just being tidy and washing your hands often.
  • feeling scared when you don’t feel scared over something you’re usually supposed to be horrified by.
  • every episode usually has one main thought that bothers you but other thoughts might occur too.
  • being told that you’re too smart to have such irrational fears. like, i know but i can’t help it.
  • it can be triggered by something most people would just pass by.
  • feeling like you’re sharing a body with something/someone that’s not you.
  • wishing you could just delete those thoughts from your head.

Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity (NGRI)

Less than 1 in 500 defendants enter a plea of NGRI, and over 90% of defendants that do enter this plea are found guilty. When a defendant is found NGRI they are not released back into society. Rather, he or she is sent to a specialised forensic hospital for a designated period of time. Depending on the offence, this can actually be longer than the sentence would have been if the person was found guilty and incarcerated. As with competency, being unable to understand the nature and consequences of the offence is not an easy threshold to reach. The defendant must be unduly impaired. In most cases these individuals are so out of contact with reality that they were not aware that they had committed a crime or that what they were doing was wrong. Those found NGRI, for this reason, usually have extensive histories of mental illness.

Career based on astrology (Part 7)

Click here for: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 |
Part 7 |

Psychiatrist / Psychologist


•Sun in Pisces, Aquarius, Gemini, Sagittarius, Scorpio, Capricorn 


•Moon in Pisces, Leo, Aries, Scorpio, Cancer, Gemini, Aquarius


•Mercury in Gemeni, Aquarius, Libra, Pisces, Scorpio, Gemini, Virgo 

•Venus in Capricorn, Aquarius, Scorpio, Virgo, Taurus, Leo 

•Mars in Gemini, Aquarius, Libra, Capricorn, Virgo, Pisces, Scorpio


•Jupiter in Pisces, Scorpio, Cancer, Virgo, Gemini, Aquarius, Libra


•Saturn in Scorpio, Cancer, Pisces, Gemini •Mars in positive aspect to Saturn 

•Moon / Neptune / Pluto in first, fourth, eighth, tenth or twelfth house
•Mercury in the twelfth house


•Moon / Neptune / Mercury in the seventh house

•Pallas in Pisces, Scorpio, Cancer, Gemini, Aquarius


•Virgo, Capricorn, Pisces, Cancer, Scorpio, Aquarius, Gemini, Sagittarius Rising


•Pisces, Scorpio, Gemeni, Aquarius Midheaven


•Neptune / Moon / Mercury / Saturn / Ascendant conjunct Pluto


•Pluto in positive aspect to Ascendant/ Sun / Moon / Mercury / Mars / Saturn


•Scorpio, Pisces, Gemini dominance


•Water or air dominance


•Dominant seventh, eighth, ninth, twelfth house


•Eighth or twelfth house stellium 

•Mercur/Neptun Midpoint conjunct MC

PSA about PMDD

I just had to post this. I had to get the word out about something that needs to be more widely known and understood.

First of all,

PMS is not a joke. It is horrible and shitty to have to go through.

Second of all,

PMDD is different and is also not a joke.

Now let me explain for those who don’t know. PMDD stands for Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder. Let’s look at those words more closely. 

Premenstrual: Roughly speaking the two-week period leading up to a woman’s menstruation every month.

Dysphoric: Dysphoria is described as being “a profound state of unease or dissatisfaction. In a psychiatric context, dysphoria may accompany depression, anxiety, or agitation.” And can often indicate an increased risk for suicide.

Disorder:  many clinicians will describe psychiatric disorders as deviant, distressful, and dysfunctional patterns of thoughts, feelings and behaviors

NOW, lets break down disorder into those 3 parts

        Deviant: thoughts or behaviors that are different from most of the rest of a given cultural context

        Distress: a subjective feeling that something is really very wrong

        Dysfunction: when a person’s ability to work, and live is clearly and often measurably impaired.

These 3 things are what the field of psychology would like to call the criteria for diagnosing someone with a mental or behavioral illness. That last one in particular. Now that was a lot of info so how about I make this all a little bit more visual…

So now that you understand what PMDD means and that it is a real diagnosable illness, lets take a look at what it means to live with it.

PMDD was added to the DSM in its most recent addition in 2013, the DSM5 lists the following 11 symptoms as characteristic of PMDD

·      Marked lability (e.g., mood swings)

·      Marked irritability or anger

·      Markedly depressed mood

·      Marked anxiety and tension

·      Decreased interest in usual activities

·      Difficulty in concentration

·      Lethargy and marked lack of energy

·      Marked change in appetite (e.g., overeating or specific food cravings)

·      Hypersomnia or insomnia

·      Feeling overwhelmed or out of control

·       Physical symptoms (e.g., breast tenderness or swelling, joint or muscle pain, a sensation of ‘bloating’ and weight gain)

Speaking as someone who has been diagnosed with this by an actual doctor, I can say that PMDD is the hardest thing I have ever had to deal with, when I am not in the premenstrual period I am constantly thinking about how far away from it I am. I plan things around it because I can, because it comes every month like clockwork. All I can do is try and enjoy my self for the two weeks every month when I am not in absolute hell. And when it comes, everything is a struggle. I have to force myself to go to class, force myself to talk to people, force myself to shower, brush my teeth and do anything other than pull myself out of crying fits and into numbness, out of anxiety attacks and into the temptation to self harm. 

After it is all over I try and move on and recover and live my life to the fullest until it comes back but that is all I can hope for. A half life.

So let me reiterate, PMDD is not ajoke. If those symptoms or my testament hit a little too close to home, please share your concerns with a doctor and get a formal diagnosis and treatment. And for everyone else, all I ask is that you spread awareness and try to think twice the next time you think about accusing a girl of PMSing because ever since 2013 this has been a bona fide mental illness. We as a society can not claim that we are working towards reducing the stigma on mental illnesses if we are only doing so for a select few on a list of many.

Please reblog and spread awareness.

When we are no longer able to change a situation, we are challenged to change ourselves.
—  from Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl, Holocaust survivor and psychiatrist