psittacosaurids

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Carnegie Museum - Part 3

The first thing to greet one’s arrival to the Cretaceous hall is one of the famous quilled specimens of Psittacosaurus. Across the way are some other Jehol Biota animals, complete with models (like this Sinornithosaurus). They look fairly well, so far as museum models of feathered dinosaurs go—that is to say, they don’t look quite like naked dinosaurs with feathers just glued on. Beside the models are a couple specimens, including this Caudipteryx with feathers and its last meal, preserved in its stomach.

A step ahead is Protoceratops, doing what it does best, whatever that may be, and across from that, Corythosaurus. Just ahead are the heavy-hitters of the Cretaceous exhibit, a pair of Tyrannosaurus rex feuding over a corpse. It’s that of Edmontosaurus, being snarled over by tyrannosaurs because this is all edmontosaurs ever did.

Just around the corner is a rare site in most dinosaur halls, a mounted Pachycephalosaurus at full charge. Next to him are a rogue’s gallery of his marginocephalian buddies, the ceratopsians. From the left clockwise, they're Pachyrhinosaurus, Zuniceratops, Diabloceratops, and Torosaurus. Their more famous cousin, Triceratops, stands a bit further down.

Last on the way out of the dinosaur hall is the recently-named caenagnathid Anzu wileyi. The fossil was discovered 15 years ago, and the holotype at this point was presumably sitting just under my feet. Spooky.

Past here, some Cenozoic skeletons and another photoset.