provost marshal

Jordan Anderson or Jourdon Anderson (1825 – 1907) was an African-American former slave noted for a letter he dictated, known as “Letter from a Freedman to His Old Master”

It was addressed to his former master, Colonel P. H. Anderson, in response to the Colonel’s request that Jordan return to the plantation to help restore the farm after the disarray of the war. It has been described as a rare example of documented “slave humor” of the period and its deadpan style has been compared to the satire of Mark Twain.

Dayton, Ohio, August 7, 1865

To my Old Master, Colonel P.H. Anderson, Big Spring, Tennessee

Sir: I got your letter and was glad to find that you had not forgotten Jourdan, and that you wanted me to come back and live with you again, promising to do better for me than anybody else can. I have often felt uneasy about you. I thought the Yankees would have hung you long before this for harboring Rebs they found at your house. I suppose they never heard about your going to Col. Martin’s to kill the Union soldier that was left by his company in their stable. Although you shot at me twice before I left you, I did not want to hear of your being hurt, and am glad you are still living. It would do me good to go back to the dear old home again and see Miss Mary and Miss Martha and Allen, Esther, Green, and Lee. Give my love to them all, and tell them I hope we will meet in the better world, if not in this. I would have gone back to see you all when I was working in the Nashville Hospital, but one of the neighbors told me Henry intended to shoot me if he ever got a chance.

I want to know particularly what the good chance is you propose to give me. I am doing tolerably well here; I get $25 a month, with victuals and clothing; have a comfortable home for Mandy (the folks here call her Mrs. Anderson), and the children, Milly Jane and Grundy, go to school and are learning well; the teacher says Grundy has a head for a preacher. They go to Sunday-School, and Mandy and me attend church regularly. We are kindly treated; sometimes we overhear others saying, “Them colored people were slaves” down in Tennessee. The children feel hurt when they hear such remarks, but I tell them it was no disgrace in Tennessee to belong to Col. Anderson. Many darkies would have been proud, as I used to was, to call you master. Now, if you will write and say what wages you will give me, I will be better able to decide whether it would be to my advantage to move back again.

As to my freedom, which you say I can have, there is nothing to be gained on that score, as I got my free papers in 1864 from the Provost- Marshal- General of the Department of Nashville. Mandy says she would be afraid to go back without some proof that you are sincerely disposed to treat us justly and kindly; and we have concluded to test your sincerity by asking you to send us our wages for the time we served you. This will make us forget and forgive old scores, and rely on your justice and friendship in the future. I served you faithfully for thirty-two years and Mandy twenty years. At $25 a month for me, and $2 a week for Mandy, our earnings would amount to $11,680. Add to this the interest for the time our wages has been kept back and deduct what you paid for our clothing and three doctor’s visits to me, and pulling a tooth for Mandy, and the balance will show what we are in justice entitled to. Please send the money by Adams Express, in care of V. Winters, esq., Dayton, Ohio. If you fail to pay us for faithful labors in the past we can have little faith in your promises in the future. We trust the good Maker has opened your eyes to the wrongs which you and your fathers have done to me and my fathers, in making us toil for you for generations without recompense. Here I draw my wages every Saturday night, but in Tennessee there was never any pay-day for the Negroes any more than for the horses and cows. Surely there will be a day of reckoning for those who defraud the laborer of his hire.

In answering this letter please state if there would be any safety for my Milly and Jane, who are now grown up and both good-looking girls. You know how it was with poor Matilda and Catherine. I would rather stay here and starve, and die if it comes to that, than have my girls brought to shame by the violence and wickedness of their young masters. You will also please state if there has been any schools opened for the colored children in your neighborhood, the great desire of my life now is to give my children an education, and have them form virtuous habits.

P.S.—Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me.

From your old servant, Jourdan Anderson

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jordan_Anderson

4

Paige Turco in the trailer of Separated at Birth (2017 movie)
↳ as Elizabeth Marshall.
(also featuring: Dominique Provost-Chalkley and Brittany Allen)

2

TRUE RELIC OF THE CIVIL WAR IN INDIAN TERRITORY:
STAND WATIE’S CHEROKEE BRAVES FLAG

This flag was carried by Colonel Stand Watie’s Cherokee Mounted Rifles; the body of the flag is the First National pattern flag of the Confederate States; the canton is blue with eleven white stars in a circle, surrounding five red stars representing the Five Civilized Tribes (Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaw and Seminole); the large red star in the center represents the Cherokee Nation. “Cherokee Braves” is lettered in red in the center of the white stripe.

The 1st Cherokee Mounted Rifles was organized in July 1861, under the command of Colonel John Drew, and consisted of full-blood Cherokees. The 2nd Cherokee Mounted Rifles was organized under the command of Colonel Stand Waite, and consisted of Cherokees of mixed blood. A portion of Drew’s regiment deserted in late 1861; the majority of the remainder deserted following the Confederate defeat at the Battle of Fort Wayne in October 1862.

The remaining members of Drew’s regiment combined with Waite’s and were reorganized as the 1st Regiment Cherokee Mounted Rifles; during the Civil War Waite’s regiment participated in twenty-seven major engagements and numerous skirmishes. Most of his activities utilized guerilla warfare tactics.

The flag was one of two captured by Lieutenant David Whittaker of Company B, 10th Regiment Kansas Volunteer Infantry at Locust Grove, Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory, on July 3, 1862.

Following the Battle of Locust Grove, Lieutenant Whittaker continued his military career, serving as provost marshal for the 1st Division of the Army of the Frontier and in St. Louis, Missouri. While in St. Louis, he was a member of a Board of Officers that examined and reported upon the qualifications of applicants for appointment as commissioned officers of colored troops. He was mustered out of service on August 19, 1864 at the expiration of his enlistment.

Returning to Doniphan County, Kansas, Whittaker was elected to the Kansas legislature in 1869 and re-elected the following year. In March 1869 he was appointed one of the commissioners to audit civilian claims from the 1864 Price Raid. In 1870 Whittaker was appointed adjutant general of Kansas and confirmed by the Kansas Senate with the rank of colonel. He served in that capacity during Governor James Harvey’s term of office. David Whittaker died on September 6, 1904 at Topeka, Kansas.

Image Courtesy Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield; WICR 30118
info courtesy: Civil War Virtual Museum

1750-victory  asked:

Whos william cunnigham? What'd he do to hale?

According to General Howe’s provost marshal, William Cunningham, the British executed two hundred and seventy-five American prisoners as well as what Cunningham called “obnoxious persons,” in New York City alone during the years the British occupied. Executions were not public affair, but Cunningham, would stand at the gallows himself and admitted that there were twelve public executions during his tenure in New York–one of which was Nathan Hale. Cunningham was part of a cluster of provost marshals who starved to death “more than two thousand [American] prisoners”. Packed so tightly in on the prison ships, Cunningham and other British soldiers would intercept food–mainly uncooked, rotten pork, hardtack and spoiled meats meant for the prisoners and sell it on the black market. The water he served was laced with bacteria and muddy. 

Cunningham was known as a drunk and a “monster”, an enforced who “wasn’t affair to carry out any grisly duty bestowed upon him.” He was known as a scow banker, in the business of crating human beings and loading them on ships headed to America from England under the promise of “great adventure” and a fuller life, only to sell them into slavery and work camps under a debt of passage once they arrived in Boston and New York. For Cunningham, the worst American was a spy. Cunningham was a heavily-built, red-haired Irishman, with a red nose and was around sixty years old. 

After Nathan Hale was brought before General Howe and sentenced the next morning to death, he was given to Cunningham who placed him in his last nigh in a greenhouse as a prisoner. Hale, a religious man requested a minister and Cunningham denied him; Hale then asked for a bible and was denied this as well. The next day, Hale was given writing utensils in a last request secretly to bid his farewell by John, a British soldier he had befriended. Cunningham did not allow him to send the letters he had written; one of which was to his elder brother Enoch. 

During Nathan’s stand for he was pushed off to hand, several on lookers growing emotional shed tears and Cunningham cursed at them, warning that if they didn’t stop, one of them “would likely enough themselves come to the same fate.” It was Cunningham who burnt Nathan’s last letters to his family and commander. Cunningham later took Nathan’s Yale diploma which he had carried on his person and flaunted it in front of Nathan’s classmates from college who was in a British prisoner. 

A lot of people asked me why I hated William Cunningham, and now you know why. I hate Cunningham with such a burning passion that I cannot formulate into words how much I detest him. He burnt Nathan’s last words to his family, he flaunted his death in front of one of his friends. Cunningham took Nathan’s last loving words away from him. He will never be forgiven. 

Letter from a Freedman to His Old Master 

by Jourdan Anderson

Dayton, Ohio, August 7, 1865

To my Old Master, Colonel P.H. Anderson, Big Spring, Tennessee

Sir: I got your letter and was glad to find that you had not forgotten Jourdan, and that you wanted me to come back and live with you again, promising to do better for me than anybody else can. I have often felt uneasy about you. I thought the Yankees would have hung you long before this for harboring Rebs they found at your house. I suppose they never heard about your going to Col. Martin’s to kill the Union soldier that was left by his company in their stable. Although you shot at me twice before I left you, I did not want to hear of your being hurt, and am glad you are still living. It would do me good to go back to the dear old home again and see Miss Mary and Miss Martha and Allen, Esther, Green, and Lee. Give my love to them all, and tell them I hope we will meet in the better world, if not in this. I would have gone back to see you all when I was working in the Nashville Hospital, but one of the neighbors told me Henry intended to shoot me if he ever got a chance.

I want to know particularly what the good chance is you propose to give me. I am doing tolerably well here; I get $25 a month, with victuals and clothing; have a comfortable home for Mandy (the folks here call her Mrs. Anderson), and the children, Milly Jane and Grundy, go to school and are learning well; the teacher says Grundy has a head for a preacher. They go to Sunday-School, and Mandy and me attend church regularly. We are kindly treated; sometimes we overhear others saying, “Them colored people were slaves” down in Tennessee. The children feel hurt when they hear such remarks, but I tell them it was no disgrace in Tennessee to belong to Col. Anderson. Many darkies would have been proud, as I used to was, to call you master. Now, if you will write and say what wages you will give me, I will be better able to decide whether it would be to my advantage to move back again.

As to my freedom, which you say I can have, there is nothing to be gained on that score, as I got my free papers in 1864 from the Provost- Marshal- General of the Department of Nashville. Mandy says she would be afraid to go back without some proof that you are sincerely disposed to treat us justly and kindly; and we have concluded to test your sincerity by asking you to send us our wages for the time we served you. This will make us forget and forgive old scores, and rely on your justice and friendship in the future. I served you faithfully for thirty-two years and Mandy twenty years. At $25 a month for me, and $2 a week for Mandy, our earnings would amount to $11,680. Add to this the interest for the time our wages has been kept back and deduct what you paid for our clothing and three doctor’s visits to me, and pulling a tooth for Mandy, and the balance will show what we are in justice entitled to. Please send the money by Adams Express, in care of V. Winters, esq., Dayton, Ohio. If you fail to pay us for faithful labors in the past we can have little faith in your promises in the future. We trust the good Maker has opened your eyes to the wrongs which you and your fathers have done to me and my fathers, in making us toil for you for generations without recompense. Here I draw my wages every Saturday night, but in Tennessee there was never any pay-day for the Negroes any more than for the horses and cows. Surely there will be a day of reckoning for those who defraud the laborer of his hire.

In answering this letter please state if there would be any safety for my Milly and Jane, who are now grown up and both good-looking girls. You know how it was with poor Matilda and Catherine. I would rather stay here and starve, and die if it comes to that, than have my girls brought to shame by the violence and wickedness of their young masters. You will also please state if there has been any schools opened for the colored children in your neighborhood, the great desire of my life now is to give my children an education, and have them form virtuous habits.

P.S.—Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me.

From your old servant, Jourdan Anderson

A lot happen’s in just 13 minutes. 

If you go by Nedley and Dolls head to Shorty’s at four (That’s what Nedley implied anyway.) then in 13 minutes; 

  1. Gus sold Shorty’s
  2. Wynonna and Doc had an altercation with Bobo
  3. Wynonna and Doc interigated then buried the Stone Witch in the salt
  4. Dolls got Wynonna her job back and
  5. Nicole and Waverly made good use of Nedley’s office. 

Either all that happened in 13 minutes (which come on, seems a little much to happen in 13 minutes) or the timelines with this show are a little funky. 

"Hey, we're with the cast of Wynonna Earp! Could you guys introduce yourselves and tell us who you play?"

Which basically means:

“We don’t know how to pronounce Dominique’s last name… We should just let her do it herself! Let’s make everyone do it to cover it up and throw in their characters so it isn’t as awkward!”

Military law in the British Army during the Great War

Military law reinforces discipline

The maintenance of discipline in the army has always been considered a very serious affair. Whilst it is clear from statistics that there was much ill-discipline in the army throughout the war, most of it was of a non-serious nature. The instances of failure to obey orders are relatively few, and the number of men convicted and suffering from serious punishment was miniscule as a proportion of the whole. The acts of discipline outlined on this page were defined by the Army Act and the Field Service Regulations.

Small scale misdemeanours

These crimes included everything from matters of individual presentation such as being unshaven, untidy or losing kit; not saluting or addressing superiors correctly; dirty or incorrect equipment; being late on parade or after curfew, etc. They would be detected and dealt with by the NCOs and officers of a man’s own unit. NCOs often gave men extra fatigues or exercise as punishment for small matters. Being confined to barracks or losing a day’s pay was a torment too, for men who were eager for rest and amusement.

Moderately serious offences

For moderately serious crimes, a man could elect to be tried by a district court-martial, or be ‘convicted’ and sentenced by his Commanding Officer. The CO could sanction maximum punishments as follows: detention up to 28 days; field punishment up to 28 days; forfeit of all pay up to 28 days; for drunkenness, a fine up to 10 shillings. The CO could inflict minor punishments, with the offender having no right to a court-martial: confinement to camp for up to 14 days; extra guard duty; reprimand, severe reprimand or admonition.

Serious matters

These were tried by Courts-Martial. Some of these offences were ones that would have been tried by a civilian court if the man had not been on active service e.g. murder or rape. Other offences were purely military in nature, such as desertion.

Table of offences tried by Copurt Martial

Charge/Maximum penalty

Shamefully delivering up a garrison to the enemy/Death

Shamefully casting away arms in the presence of the enemy/Death

Misbehaving before the enemy in such a manner as to show cowardice/Death

Leaving the ranks on pretence of taking wounded men to the rear/Penal Servitude

Wilfully destroying property without orders/Penal Servitude

Leaving his CO to go in search of plunder/Death

Forcing a safeguard/Death

Forcing a soldier when acting as sentinel/Death

Doing violence to a person bringing provisions to the forces/Death

Committing an offence against the person of a resident in the country in which he was serving/Death

Breaking into a house in search of plunder/Death

By discharging firearms intentionally occasioning false alarms on the march/Death

When acting as a sentinel on active service sleeping at his post/Death

By discharging firearms negligently occasioning false alarms in camp/Cashiering or imprisonment

Causing a mutiny in the forces, or endeavouring to persuade persons in HM forces to join in a mutiny/Death

Striking his superior officer/Death

Offering violence or using threatening language to his superior officer/Penal servitude

Disobeying in such a manner as to show a wilful defiance of authority, a lawful command given personally by his superior officer/Death

Disobeying a lawful command given by his superior officer/Penal servitude

When concerned in a quarrel, refusing to obey an officer who ordered him into arrest/Cashiering

Striking a person in whose custody he was placed/Cashiering or imprisonment

Deserting HM service, or attempting to desert/Death

Fraudulent enlistment/First offence imprisonment; second penal servitude

Assisting a person subject to military law to desert/Imprisonment

Behaving in a scandalous manner unbecoming the character of an officer and a gentleman/Cashiering

When charged with the care of public money, embezzling the same/Penal servitude

When charged with the care of public goods, misapplying the same (applicable to Quartermasters)/Penal servitude

Wilfully maiming himself with intent to render himself unfit for service/Imprisonment

Drunkenness/Cashiering or imprisonment

Committing the offence of murder/Death

Notes to this table: (1) offences where cashiering is shown as maximum punishment applied to officers only; (2) in order to enable a court-martial to award a field punishment, it was essential to allege 'when on active service’.

Types of Court-Martial

The courts-martial process was meant to be thorough, well-documented and carried out in accordance with law expressed in the Army Act which was subject to annual re-consideration by Parliament. Men on trial were supposed to be represented, and much evidence gathered and considered. In practice, especially at times of stress due to action, both of these principles were ignored or only barely adhered to. Documentation was often scanty, the process quick; men were often not represented, and indeed were often tried by officers of their own regiment or corps.


The outcomes of Courts Martial

In all, 5,952 officers and 298,310 other ranks were court-martialled. This amounts to just over 3% of the total of men who joined the army. Of those tried, 89% were convicted; 8% acquitted; the rest were either convicted without the conviction being confirmed or with it being subsequently quashed. Of those convicted, 30% were for absence without leave; 15% for drunkenness;14% for desertion (although only 3% were actually in the field at the time); 11% for insubordination; 11% for loss of army property, and the remaining 19% for various other crimes. The main punishments applied were : 3 months detention in a military compound - 24%; Field Punishment Number 1 - 22%; Fines - 12%; 6 months detention - 10%; reduction in rank - 10%; Field Punishment Number 2 - 8%.

3.080 men (1.1% of those convicted) were sentenced to death. Of these, 89% were reprieved and the sentence converted to a different one. 346 men were executed. Their crimes included desertion - 266; murder - 37; cowardice in the face of the enemy - 18; quitting their post - 7; striking or showing violence to their superiors - 6; disobedience - 5; mutiny - 3; sleeping at post - 2; casting away arms - 2. Of the 346, 91 were already under a suspended sentence from an earlier conviction (40 of these a suspended death sentence).

Field punishments

Field Punishment Number 1 consisted of the convicted man being shackled in irons and secured to a fixed object, often a gun wheel or similar. He could only be thus fixed for up to 2 hours in 24, and not for more than 3 days in 4, or for more than 21 days in his sentence. This punishment was often known as 'crucifixion’ and due to its humiliating nature was viewed by many Tommies as unfair. Field Punishment Number 2 was similar except the man was shackled but not fixed to anything. Both forms were carried out by the office of the Provost-Marshal, unless his unit was officially on the move when it would be carried out regimentally i.e. by his own unit.

Military Police

Military Police matters came under the office of the Adjutant-General. On his behalf, the Provost-Marshal supervised military police duties of the army in the field. At each level of the army hierarchy, the AG and the PM were represented. Each infantry Division, for example, had an Assistant Provost-Marshal, who received orders from the Divisional Assistant Adjutant-General, and who was responsible for organising the police under his command. The military police ('redcaps’ from the red cover around their service cap) were responsible for arresting all persons found without passes, plundering, making unlawful requisitions, or committing offences of any kind. They were also responsible for collecting stragglers, and for guarding against spies. In case of emergency they could call upon any troops in the vicinity to supply guards, sentries or patrols. In the Indian Army, the Provost-Marshal could order corporal punishment without trial, of up to 30 lashes.

[Detail] Provost Marshal’s Office, Aquia Creek.
Winter of 1862-1863
Negative by Timothy H. O'Sullivan
Published in [Alexander] Gardner’s Sketch Book [sic] of the [Civil] War
Rare Book, Special Collections Department
Maryland Historical Society
E 468.7 .G22, Vol. 1

“One of the first operations of the war (upon the Potomac) was the destruction of the wharf and depot of the Fredericksburg and Richmond Railroad at Aquia Creek…
When the rebels gave up the blockade of the Potomac, quite a chain of works existed here. In the winter of 1862 it became the base of supplies for the army at Falmouth; the wharf was rebuilt, greatly enlarged and improved, and quite a town of hastily but well-constructed buildings put up; among them, and close upon the railroad track, the Provost Marshal’s office.” - Gardner’s Sketch Book of the War

Alexander Gardner (October 17, 1821 – December 10, 1882):
In 1866, Gardner published a two-volume work, Gardner’s Photographic Sketch Book of the War. Each volume contained 50 hand-mounted original prints.

World War I Draft Registration Card for Alphonse Capone.

Item From: Records of the Selective Service System (World War I). (1917-07/15/1919)

The Selective Service Act of May 18, 1917, allowed the President to temporarily increase the size of the U.S. military in times of war. During World War I, the Army’s Office of the Provost Marshall General oversaw the registration of about 24 million men. This draft card is interesting because it shows that Al Capone identified himself as a Paper Cutter from Brooklyn.

There were three sequential registrations that sought out male citizens according to their age : first on June 5, 1917; second on June 5, 1918 and on August 24, 1918, and third on September 12, 1918. The first registration sought young men aged from 21-30 years of age. The second registration was split between two days to first seek those who had turned 21 since June 5, 1917, and subsequently turned 21 since June 2, 1918.The third registration sought all men aged from 18 to 45 who had not previously registered.

Source: http://research.archives.gov/description/641747

Dayton, Ohio,

August 7, 1865

To My Old Master, Colonel P.H. Anderson, Big Spring, Tennessee

Sir: I got your letter, and was glad to find that you had not forgotten Jourdon, and that you wanted me to come back and live with you again, promising to do better for me than anybody else can. I have often felt uneasy about you. I thought the Yankees would have hung you long before this, for harboring Rebs they found at your house. I suppose they never heard about your going to Colonel Martin’s to kill the Union soldier that was left by his company in their stable. Although you shot at me twice before I left you, I did not want to hear of your being hurt, and am glad you are still living. It would do me good to go back to the dear old home again, and see Miss Mary and Miss Martha and Allen, Esther, Green, and Lee. Give my love to them all, and tell them I hope we will meet in the better world, if not in this. I would have gone back to see you all when I was working in the Nashville Hospital, but one of the neighbors told me that Henry intended to shoot me if he ever got a chance.

I want to know particularly what the good chance is you propose to give me. I am doing tolerably well here. I get twenty-five dollars a month, with victuals and clothing; have a comfortable home for Mandy,—the folks call her Mrs. Anderson,—and the children—Milly, Jane, and Grundy—go to school and are learning well. The teacher says Grundy has a head for a preacher. They go to Sunday school, and Mandy and me attend church regularly. We are kindly treated. Sometimes we overhear others saying, “Them colored people were slaves” down in Tennessee. The children feel hurt when they hear such remarks; but I tell them it was no disgrace in Tennessee to belong to Colonel Anderson. Many darkeys would have been proud, as I used to be, to call you master. Now if you will write and say what wages you will give me, I will be better able to decide whether it would be to my advantage to move back again.

As to my freedom, which you say I can have, there is nothing to be gained on that score, as I got my free papers in 1864 from the Provost-Marshal-General of the Department of Nashville. Mandy says she would be afraid to go back without some proof that you were disposed to treat us justly and kindly; and we have concluded to test your sincerity by asking you to send us our wages for the time we served you. This will make us forget and forgive old scores, and rely on your justice and friendship in the future. I served you faithfully for thirty-two years, and Mandy twenty years. At twenty-five dollars a month for me, and two dollars a week for Mandy, our earnings would amount to eleven thousand six hundred and eighty dollars. Add to this the interest for the time our wages have been kept back, and deduct what you paid for our clothing, and three doctor’s visits to me, and pulling a tooth for Mandy, and the balance will show what we are in justice entitled to. Please send the money by Adams’s Express, in care of V. Winters, Esq., Dayton, Ohio. If you fail to pay us for faithful labors in the past, we can have little faith in your promises in the future. We trust the good Maker has opened your eyes to the wrongs which you and your fathers have done to me and my fathers, in making us toil for you for generations without recompense. Here I draw my wages every Saturday night; but in Tennessee there was never any pay-day for the negroes any more than for the horses and cows. Surely there will be a day of reckoning for those who defraud the laborer of his hire.

In answering this letter, please state if there would be any safety for my Milly and Jane, who are now grown up, and both good-looking girls. You know how it was with poor Matilda and Catherine. I would rather stay here and starve—and die, if it come to that—than have my girls brought to shame by the violence and wickedness of their young masters. You will also please state if there has been any schools opened for the colored children in your neighborhood. The great desire of my life now is to give my children an education, and have them form virtuous habits.

Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me.

From your old servant,

Jourdon Anderson.

— 

In August of 1865, a Colonel P.H. Anderson of Big Spring, Tennessee, wrote to his former slave, Jourdon Anderson, and requested that he come back to work on his farm. Jourdon — who, since being emancipated, had moved to Ohio, found paid work, and was now supporting his family — responded with this.

woke woke woke

abridged version: “oh you want me back? THEN FUCKIN PAY ME WHAT YOU OWE PIGNIGGA!!! and don’t think i forgot that you’re fuckin evil. you can suck this dick.”