proving nothing

anonymous asked:

Good morning!!!! Y'all ready for today's excuses and lame ass scenarios? I'm in such a good mood lol T and Z are obviously celebrating Thanksgiving again this year. It might be their favorite holiday lol 🤗🤗🤗 stay pressed haters we're out here living as T and Z do nothing but prove us right 👏👏

🙌🙌

anonymous asked:

Yo you've got 200 updoots on /r/tumblrinaction

holy shit lol

the comments are all so embarrassing

how do people miss a joke so badly holy shit. arent these the kind of ppl who always talk about “taking things too seriously” ??

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i just like drawing jimin (photo cred)

I posted this on instagram and some people lost their minds, so to clarify, this is about our president working with/for Putin to undermine the US, while at the same time insulting our allies.Trump is a compulsive liar and has done nothing to prove that he is someone who can be trusted (no tax returns, didn’t divest his business, etc) and his actions in the last two weeks undermine our country’s security, both physically and economically.

I have a breadth of criticism for the man, but I would implore any and all to do their own research on sites without bias (avoid Breitbart/Huffpo/etc, read NYT). 

“I cut my hair the other day. It used to be down to my waist. It’s a personal experiment. I’m trying to prove to myself that I can have short hair and still be feminine. It can be hard when I step out on the street and all the other women have long hair. I think a lot of people see short hair, and form an idea that I hate men, or that I only think about business. But I still feel feminine inside. I guess I want to prove that feeling has nothing to do with the type of attention I’m getting.”

(Moscow, Russia)

Why Wonder Woman was so Important to Me

I had the opportunity to see Wonder Woman recently, and I was left awestruck.  Wonder Woman is such a timeless character, and I feel this story and the way the film was made really captured the heart of the original character.  With DC’s track record, it had a high chance of being lazy and bad.  But it wasn’t.  It was original. Refreshing. I cried a lot, and here’s why.

1. Women Are Strong 

I’m not one to loudly complain about the misrepresentation of women in media (though we often are).  We’ve had some really awesome and strong female characters over the past couple years.  But somehow, Wonder Woman took this in a completely new direction.  Watching the Amazons fight the invaders on the beach nearly brought me to tears.  It was so special for me to see women take on roles we rarely see them in.  They were the fighters, the protectors, the providers.  There are many women out in the world right now who are fighting their own battles, much like the Amazons.  They’re providing for their families or serving their countries through the military.  It was a pleasant reminder that while men and women have differences, they are equally strong and skilled.

(Also yay for a female director!)

2. Actions Speak Louder

Many times, Wonder Woman is questioned.  She’s scoffed at for being a women (which would have been very common during that time).  She’s underestimated.  But what’s so amazing here is that she never has to prove herself to the men.  It would’ve been so easy for the movie to fall into that common trope.  She never argues with a man and she focuses her attention on others instead of herself.  She wants to kill Ares and stop the war. And in the end, her actions speak louder then her words ever could.  What I took from this is to rise to action.  Stop talking and start doing.  Ignore what others say, because you know what you can do.  Hold your head high and rise above.

3. Mutual Respect Brings the Most Success

As I said before, it would have been easy for the film to fall into certain tropes.  A trope we often see nowadays is a woman proving that she (or all women) are better then men.  That’s never a point of conflict in this film.  Her love interest, Steve, fights as her equal.  He isn’t clumsy or weak to make Wonder Woman look stronger.  He believes in her and helps her to the best of his ability. When they become interested in each other romantically, they both hold their own.  They love each other but are not dependent on one another.  We see the rest of the men in their gang react the same way later on.  They all eventually come to love and respect Diana.  It’s a great reminder that feminism is about collaboration and equality, not one gender being better then the other.  We each have something to bring to the table and our differences are what makes us stronger. 

4. It’s Okay to not be Okay

There’s a really interesting character in Wonder Woman’s gang named Charlie.  He’s supposed to be the world’s top shooter, but time and time again he fails.  He seen some things that have damaged him pretty heavily.  What’s really interesting about this character is that we never see this issue resolved.  He doesn’t have his big “hero moment” where he is suddenly able to shoot and save the day.  This is so much like real life.  We’ve all been hurt, and it’s ok to be damaged.  You have nothing to prove, but your great efforts will help everything to turn out right in the end.  At one point, Charlie even says to Diana “You don’t need me, you’re better of without me.” To this she replies “No, Charlie, if you’re not here, who will sing?” This implies that Charlie is still a valued member of the group, despite his shortcomings.  His friends are able to recognize his other strengths when he cannot.  


5. There is Much Darkness in the World, But Love Will Save the Day

Not much to say here, as Diana said it all in her own monologue:

“I used to want to save the world, to end war and bring peace to mankind. But then I glimpsed the darkness that lives within their light. I learnt that inside every one of them there will always be both. The choice each must make for themselves - something no hero will ever defeat. And now I know… that only love can truly save the world. So now I stay, I fight, and I give - for the world I know can be. This is my mission now, for ever.”

Often times love is portrayed as a great weakness. But it isn’t.  To love is to truly see beauty in the world.  To love is to be brave and strong.  Love is the greatest power of all.  

Additional Notes:

We must learn to forgive.  Diana had the opportunity to kill the chemist responsible for Steve’s death.  And she chose not too, instead focusing on the larger problem at hand and in turn leaving the past in the past.

There were not gratuitous or sexualized shots of the women in the film.  The framing was based around the action.  The women were all beautiful, but the film relied on it’s story and the strength of it’s lead rather then her beauty. 

There will always be hardship. There isn’t always one bad guy to fight.  We all will have to continue to fight our demons and endure through our trials.  But it’s the light and the love, those precious moments, that we fight for.

Thanks Wonder Woman.  You inspired me, and I’m so grateful.  I don’t think I’ve seen a superhero movie with more heart.  There will be many days ahead where I think “What would Wonder Woman do?” 

*I may edit and add on to more of this at a later time, but I wanted to get my initial thoughts out!

stuck on you. (m) | 01

“I want you to take my virginity.”
“What the fuck did you just ask me, Kim Taehyung?”

or, alternatively:

you’re not actually supposed to take your bestfriend’s virginity when he asks, right?

pairing: kim taehyung x reader 
genre: attempt at crack, eventual smut, college au
warnings: sexual jokes (like a cringe-worthy amount)
words: 9,582k
part: 01/03

out of context quote:
[9:52 am] Taehyung:  ___\o/___ me drowning in ur pussy lol 




“I want you to take my virginity.”



You’ve just taken a gulp of your pulp-included orange juice when Taehyung says this. He’s sitting across from you in the cafeteria of the University you both attend - have attended for the past two years.



His brown coffee coated eyes are staring directly into yours - a serious expression written across his features that tells you what he’s just spoken was said in nothing but pure seriousness.



And he says it so nonchalantly - so earnestly, that you do the only thing you can think of.



A perfectly reasonable reaction after hearing that your best friend, the boy you’ve been in love with for over two years - wants you to take his virginity.



You spit your orange juice out all over him.


Keep reading

Hey everyone!

As a first post I decided to share with you some inspirational quotes that you could use in your bullet journals, planners, and studyblrs!

I personally believe the more you look at these the more motivated you can get. It works with me and I hope it works with you guys. If you have any requests feel free to message me J

·        “Do something today that your future self will thank you for.” -Sean Patrick Flanery

·        “Let your smile change the world but don’t let the world change your smile.”

·        “She remembered who she was and the game changed.” -Lalah Deliah

·        “The best project you’ll ever work on is you.”

·        “No one is you and that is your super power.”

·        “Make it happen. Shock everyone.”

·        “Life is tough but so are you.”

·        “Be a voice not an echo.”

·        “Just because my path is different doesn’t mean I’m lost.”

·        “Happiness looks gorgeous on you.”

·        “Rule your mind or it will rule you.” –Buddha

·        “Do good for others. It will come back in unexpected ways.” –Buddha

·        “Difficult roads often lead to beautiful destinations”

·        “You alone are enough. You have nothing to prove to anyone.” –Maya Angelou

·        “Drive for progress no perfection.”

·        “You never fail until you stop trying.” –Albert Einstein

·        “Stop being afraid of what could go wrong and think about what could go right.”

·        “If it makes you happy no one else’s opinion should matter.”

·        “You are amazing. Remember that.”

·        “You can.”

·        “Mistakes are proof that you’re trying.”

·        “1 year = 365 opportunities”

·        “It’s the little things in life.”

·        “Don’t stop until you’re proud.”

·        “I can and I will.”

·        “Never stop looking up.”

·        “Better an oops than a what if.”

·        “If you stumble make it part of the dance.”

·        “You can totally do this.”

·        “Be happy, it drives people crazy.”

·        “Don’t look back you’re not going that way.”

·        “Chin up princess or the crown slips.”

·        “Be the girl who decided to go for it.”

·        “Inhale confidence. Exhale doubt.”

·        “You have to be odd to be number one.” –Dr. Seuss

·        “Believe in yourself and you will be unstoppable.”

·        “A grateful heart is a magnet for miracles.”

·        “Actually, I can.”

·        “Be silly. Be honest. Be kind.”

·        “Do what they think you can’t do.”

·        “You’re mad. Bonkers. Off your head…but I’ll tell you a secret…all the best people are.” –Alice in wonderland

·        “Your speed doesn’t matter. Forward is forward.”

·        “Just breathe.”

·        “Be happy with your beautiful life.”

·        “Smile more worry less.”

·        “Positive mind. Positive vibes. Positive life.”

·        “the best way to get things done is to simply begin.”

·        “If you don’t like where you are move. You are not a tree.”

·        “What feels like the end is often the begging.”

Well that’s it for today. I’ll be back soon with some more quotes and maybe some lyrics.

See you then! *Waves*

i don’t understand how some of you can sit here and try to force this mind set on people to believe that harry is doing this whole big solo thing when actually hes been doing nothing extra so far & doing a normal single release (just a little more dramatic and artsy) and that hes trying to erase himself from the band or trying to move on and forget the past / the boys and trying to convince everyone that hes the one ending the band when

1.) the band has been on hiatus since the end of 2015
2.) harry could’ve been a solo artist since like 2013 but never left the band
3.) its been over a year since the band went on break and hes just now releasing music, if he wanted to be the next jt he would’ve did it like a month after the break
4.) he explained in his magazine how they are on break and doing their own things
5.) he also explained in his magazine how this band was the best thing that ever happened to him
6.) just because hes being over hyped by his friends and the media doesnt mean harry asked / wanted them too, they have been over hyping everything he does for attention since xfactor tbh why is everyone acting surprised now ???
7.) he supported niall on his single, he supported louis at the xfactor with his new single
8.) the team (jeff & co) you are saying are encouraging the harry + ot3 hate were also the ones tweeting for 1d to win a brit rmbr ??? like ???

also did everyone forget that the boys all just wished him happy birthday publicly, even louis, louis !!! who hasnt tweeted harry publicly since like what 2013 or 14 i think like ??? if harry was this hot shot who wanted nothing to do with them they would’ve ignored him and not posted anything like they do on zayns birthday :) sooo i think that until harry says himself that hes over 1D (like zayn did when he went solo) im going to ignore this negativity around him because he doesnt deserve it, its not his fault that they put this image on him, he deserves a chance like niall and louis to be listened to and supported like we havent even heard him fucking speak yet and everyone is already turning on him relax, breathe, jesus christ.

Top Misconceptions People Have about Pulp-Era Science Fiction

A lot of people I run into have all kinds of misconceptions about what pulp-era scifi, from the 1920s-1950s, was actually like. 


“Pulp-Era Science Fiction was about optimistic futures.”

Optimistic futures were always, always vastly outnumbered by end of the world stories with mutants, Frankenstein creations that turn against us, murderous robot rebellions, terrifying alien invasions, and atomic horror. People don’t change. Then as now, we were more interested in hearing about how it could all go wrong. 

To quote H.L. Gold, editor of Galaxy Science Fiction, in 1952: 

“Over 90% of stories submitted to Galaxy Science Fiction still nag away at atomic, hydrogen and bacteriological war, the post atomic world, reversion to barbarism, mutant children killed because they have only ten toes and fingers instead of twelve….the temptation is strong to write, ‘look, fellers, the end isn’t here yet.’”

The movie Tomorrowland is a particulary egregious example of this tremendous misconception (and I can’t believe Brad Bird passed on making Force Awakens to make a movie that was 90 minutes of driving through the Florida swamps). In reality, pre-1960s scifi novels trafficked in dread, dystopian futures, and fear. There was simply never a time when optimistic scifi was overrepresented, even the boyish Jules Verne became skeptical of the possibilities of technology all the way at the turn of the century. One of the most famous pulp scifi yarns was Jack Williamson’s The Humanoids, about a race of Borg-like robots who so totally micromanage humans “for our own protection” that they leave us with nothing to do but wait “with folded hands.”


“Pulp scifi often featured muscular, large-chinned, womanizing main characters.”

Here’s the image often used in parodies of pulp scifi: the main character is a big-chinned, ultra-muscular dope in tights who is a compulsive womanizer and talks like Adam West in Batman. Whenever I see this, I think to myself…what exactly is it they’re making fun of?

It’s more normal than you think to find parodies of things that never actually existed. Mystery buffs and historians, for example, can’t find a single straight example of “the Butler did it.” It’s a thing people think is a thing that was never a thing, and another example would be the idea of the “silent film villain” in a mustache and top hat (which there are no straight examples of, either). There are no non-parody examples of Superman changing in a phone booth; he just never did this.

In reality, my favorite description of pulp mag era science fiction heroes is that they are “wisecracking Anglo-Saxon engineers addicted to alcohol and tobacco who like nothing better than to explain things to others that they already know.” The average pulp scifi hero had speech patterns best described as “Mid-Century American Wiseass” than like Adam West or the Lone Ranger. 

The nearest the Spaceman Spiff stereotype came to hitting the mark was with the magazine heroes of the Lensmen and Captain Future, and they’re both nowhere near close. Captain Future was a muscular hero with a chin, but he also had a Captain Picard level desire to use diplomacy first, and believed that most encounters with aliens were only hostile due to misunderstandings and lack of communication (and the story makes him right). He also didn’t seem interested in women, mostly because he had better things to do for the solar system and didn’t have the time for love. The Lensmen, on the other hand, had a ruthless, bloodthirsty streak, and were very much like the “murder machine” Brock Sampson (an attitude somewhat justified by the stakes in their struggle). 


“Pulp Era Scifi were mainly action/adventure stories with good vs. evil.” 

This is a half-truth, since, like so much other genre fiction, scifi has always been sugared up with fight scenes and chases. And there was a period, early in the century, when most scifi followed the Edgar Rice Burroughs model and were basically just Westerns or swashbucklers with different props, ray guns instead of six-shooters. But the key thing to remember is how weird so much of this scifi was, and that science fiction, starting in the mid-1930s, eventually became something other than just adventure stories with different trappings. 

One of my favorite examples of this is A. Bertram Chandler’s story, “Giant-Killer.” The story is about rats on a starship who acquire intelligence due to proximity to the star drive’s radiation, and who set about killing the human crew one by one. Another great example is Eando Binder’s Adam Link stories, told from the point of view of a robot who is held responsible for the death of his creator.

What’s more, one of the best writers to come out of this era is best known for never having truly evil bad guys: Isaac Asimov. His “Caves of Steel,” published in 1953, had no true villains. The Spacers, who we assumed were snobs, only isolated themselves because they had no immunities to the germs of earth.


“Racism was endemic to the pulps.”

It is absolutely true that the pulps reflected the unconscious views of society as a whole at the time, but as typical of history, the reality was usually much more complex than our mental image of the era. For instance, overt racism was usually shown as villainous: in most exploration magazines like Adventure, you can typically play “spot the evil asshole we’re not supposed to like” by seeing who calls the people of India “dirty monkeys” (as in Harold Lamb). 

Street & Smith, the largest of all of the pulp publishers, had a standing rule in the 1920s-1930s to never to use villains who were ethnic minorities because of the fear of spreading race hate by negative portrayals. In fact, in one known case, the villain of Resurrection Day was going to be a Japanese General, but the publisher demanded a revision and he was changed to an American criminal. Try to imagine if a modern-day TV network made a rule that minority groups were not to be depicted as gang bangers or drug dealers, for fear that this would create prejudice when people interact with minority groups in everyday life, and you can see how revolutionary this policy was. It’s a mistake to call this era very enlightened, but it’s also a mistake to say everyone born before 1970 was evil.


“Pulp scifi writers in the early days were indifferent to scientific reality and played fast and loose with science.”

 FALSE.

 This is, by an order of magnitude, the most false item on this list.

In fact, you might say that early science fiction fandom were obsessed with scientific accuracy to the point it was borderline anal retentive. Nearly every single one of the lettercols in Astounding Science Fiction were nitpickers fussing about scientific details. In fact, modern scifi fandom’s grudging tolerance for storytelling necessities like sound in space at the movies, or novels that use “hyperspace” are actually something of a step down from what the culture around scifi was in the 1920s-1950s. Part of it was due to the fact that organized scifi fandom came out of science clubs; Hugo Gernsback created the first scifi pulp magazine as a way to sell electronics and radio equipment to hobbyists, and the “First Fandom” of the 1930s were science enthusiasts who talked science first and the fiction that speculated about it second.

In retrospect, a lot of it was just plain obvious insecurity: in a new medium considered “kid’s stuff,” they wanted to show scifi was plausible, relevant, and something different from “fairy tales.” It’s the same insecure mentality that leads video gamers to repeatedly ask if games are art. You’ve got nothing to prove there, guys, calm down (and take it from a pulp scifi aficionado, the most interesting things are always done in the period when a medium is considered disposable trash). 

One of the best examples was the famous Howard P. Lovecraft, who published “The Shadow out of Time” in the 1936 issue of Astounding. Even though it might be the only thing from that issue that is even remotely reprinted today, the letters page from this issue practically rose up in revolt against this story as not being based on accurate science. Lovecraft was never published in Astounding ever again.

If you ever wanted to find out what Star Wars would be like if they were bigger hardasses about scientific plausibility, check out E.E. Smith’s Lensman series. People expect a big, bold, brassy space opera series with heroes and villains to play fast and loose, but it was shockingly scientifically grounded.

To be fair, science fiction was not a monolith on this. One of the earliest division in science fiction was between the Astounding Science Fiction writers based in New York, who often had engineering and scientific backgrounds and had left-wing (in some cases, literally Communist) politics, and the Amazing Stories writers based in the Midwest, who were usually self taught, and had right-wing, heartland politics. Because the Midwestern writers in Amazing Stories were often self-taught, they had a huge authority problem with science and played as fast and loose as you could get. While this is true, it’s worth noting science fiction fandom absolutely turned on Amazing Stories for this, especially when the writers started dabbling with spiritualism and other weirdness like the Shaver Mystery. And to this day, it’s impossible to find many Amazing Stories tales published elsewhere.

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