protests washington

I channeled some of my rage and despair into this piece today, it helped a little. To all my sisters marching tomorrow, stay safe, be aware of your surroundings but most importantly, show them that we will not be stopped, we will not conform. This battle rages on. Stay Angry, my friends.



EDIT: by popular demand, I made this illustration available as a print and other merchandise, if you’re interested please visit my soc6 page right over >>>> here <<<< thank you for all the love and support. And to all of you that are marching today with me, say it loud sisters, stay strong and stay safe!! <3

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The Native Nations March is currently taking place through D.C. and at the White House, capping off a four-day protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline. As indigenous groups from all over the country continue to call for a meeting with Donald Trump, news outlets need make sure the voices of water protectors and environmental activists are heard.

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Charleena Lyles was a “powerful lady” — until she faced Seattle’s flawed criminal justice system

  • Charleena Lyles’ younger brother, Domico Jones, has an endearing nickname for his sister: “String bean Leen.”
  • The 30-year-old mother’s physical build and her documented history of mental illness made the circumstances of her shooting death by Seattle police on Sunday all the more confusing to the family. 
  • How could the officers who killed Lyles see her as a threat after she’d called 911 to report a burglary at her apartment, the family wondered. 
  • The petite and reportedly pregnant woman, whose mental illness was known to Seattle police, experienced homelessness and was a victim of domestic violence during her short life.
  • In Seattle, Lyles’ death puts her at the intersection of several social justice issues. Excessive uses of force by officers, the over-reliance on prisons and jails to deal with women who experience mental health instabilities and a lack of adequate treatment are among the most persistent problems, advocates say. 
  • For nearly five years, Seattle has tried to address some of these issues — the city is under a federal order to retrain its police force and address a pattern of brutality against subjects who exhibit serious psychological distress. 
  • But Lyles’ case suggests these efforts are falling short, as have similar efforts in criminal justice systems around the country. Read more. (6/24/17, 8:41 AM)

Finally decided to do a Character Design Challenge. This months theme is Hippie. Her name is Eleanor and her cat is called Rigby. She has been woke since the 60s. Greatly inspired by recent events

also on my Instagram @ annawardart

You can purchase a print on my society6 storehttps://society6.com/product/still-protesting-womans-march_print#s6-6700603p4a1v45

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Attendees from across the country descended on the nation’s capital to speak up for science.

The March for Science unfolded on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, and in multiple cities around the world. Coinciding with Earth Day, the event drew researchers, educators and scientifically-minded people.

The event kicked off with open teaching sessions on the Mall, followed by a rally near the Washington Monument, and then a march that traveled to the U.S. Capitol building.

NPR spoke to some of the participants about why they decided to attend the March for Science.

PHOTOS: Scientists Take To Washington To Stress A Nonpartisan Agenda

Photos: Meredith Rizzo/NPR

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Powerful images show the #NativeNationsRise protests happening in Washington, DC

  • President Donald Trump and his allies may have ordered the removal of Native American demonstrators from their protest camp at Standing Rock in February, but it was far from a knockout blow.
  • On Friday, hundreds of indigenous protesters and their supporters rallied in cities across the United States to oppose Trump’s policies on Native lands, and to demand he stop prioritizing corporate interests over their own. Read more (3/10/17 3:14 PM)

follow @the-movemnt

A Day Without a Woman: What you need to know

The Women’s March on Washington galvanized women across the globe and gave voice to a rising political force on a history-making day. More than 2 million people took to the streets in Washington, D.C., and cities small and large on Jan. 21 to protest a new administration they fear will roll back civil, human and reproductive rights.

Will that voice thunder again?

On Wednesday, International Women’s Day, the organizers behind the January march are planning a showing of economic solidarity in walkouts, rallies and marches dubbed A Day Without a Woman.

Read more. 

(Photo: Kyle Grantham, The News Journal)