protect the oceans

The gods are among us.

Zeus drinks himself half to death at the bar. He makes bedroom eyes at every pretty girl to walk in the room. They will clutch their cans of mace a little tighter as they walk home tonight.

Aphrodite helps a beaten girl to her feet, holding her tight as her young body is racked with sobs. Artemis stands nearby, preparing to hunt the thief of this young girl’s innocence. These are the only hunts she participates in anymore.

Athena glares at Ares as bloody knuckles and booted feet connect with battered bodies between them. The fight clubs are their temples now.

Dionysus stands behind a bar, serving drinks to rowdy men and pretty girls. Later, he will be found holding back the hair of girls, too young for the drinks they swallowed, as they vomit the concoctions they drank to forget the pain in the world. Dionysus understands and so he drinks more than anyone, if only to forget the suffering that has filled his immortal life.

Hestia mourns the numerous broken homes. She puts extra effort in protecting the scant few happy families left. So Hestia has created a home for those lost and abandoned, for she too knows how it feels to be cast out by the family who should have loved you unconditionally. She understands what it feels like to be adrift and homeless.

Apollo sits on a busy, crowded street, strumming his guitar and singing a song of loss and pain. He uses poetry and music to mourn the pain in the world. He berates himself constantly, because for every life he saves, ten more are extinguished. He has stopped visiting hospitals because he can’t help but feel his efforts are futile. He hasn’t seen his sister in years, and he misses her most at night, when he can see her beloved stars and moon.

Hermes slumps in a chair, exhausted from the horror gracing the human news. He decides he is no longer deserving of the title “messenger of the gods,” since he hasn’t delivered a message in centuries. Not when the gods no longer keep in touch. So he reverts to his favorite pastime: stealing. But what use is mortal money to a god?

Hera sits in the shadows of a bar and struggles to summon the dredges of the vindictive, jealous anger that used to come so easily to her when she saw her husband with another woman. Hera thinks that perhaps in this modern world, she would do better as the goddess of divorce. Because, really, how can she profess that marriage is the best gift the world has to offer when she can’t even keep her husband in her bed? When he doesn’t even bother pretending that he loves her? Yes, goddess of failed marriages has such a lovely, miserable ring to it.

Poseidon wanders the beach, picking up the scattered trash that poisons his domain. His tears mix with the salt water on his cheeks and he weeps for the suffering of his oceans. He feels the pollution like a phantom pain, and he scoffs at himself, full of loathing for the god of the sea who could not protect his oceans from mortals.

Hades lounges in his extravagant mansion, smiling at his lovely wife curled at his side. Blessed is he, for there will always be death, and mortals will always worship his riches. Of all his siblings, Hades, the scorned brother, cursed to rule the underworld, is the only one to still enjoy immortality.

Persephone is as beautiful as ever and she is happy with her loving husband who always joins her in her protests, right alongside her as she weeps for for the dying of this earth, as she cries herself to sleep at night when she thinks of all the loss of nature’s beauty and life. This world is suffering and she is the only one to hear its cries. They haunt her dreams.

Hecate flips the sign on the window to say closed. She longs for days gone by when people knew the truth. Magic is very real. Instead, she has to smile politely while customers come to her store to purchase items they know not how to use and religious men preach about how witchcraft is a sin, and she will burn in hell. Hecate does not care. She is as immortal as magic.

Cupid narrows his eyes with scorn every time he hears the word love fly from the lips of people who do not understand the meaning of the word. Though who is he to judge them when all his matchmaking attempts end in failure. Perhaps the mortals simple do not want him to decide who they love. Perhaps it is their turn to choose.

Athena prowls through college campuses, holding signs high in protect with the students around her. These fearless children are her people. She scoffs at the professors who are simply going through the motions, who fail to appreciate the brilliant minds all around them. She never fails to notice.

Ares picks his way across a battlefield and finds himself at the ruins of what used to be an elementary school. He no longer understands war, hasn’t for centuries. This was not brave, this was not heroic. This was senseless bloodshed. He sees nothing holy in this ruined world.

Aphrodite swallows the bile in her throat as she hears another rapist has been left free. She glares daggers at boys yelling obscene things at women. She’s long stopped romanticizing love. However, sometimes she sees a young girl handing over her baby to an older couple who tried for years, and she remembers what she once represented. Sometimes she sees Ares across the room of soldiers returning from the horrors of war, and as they embrace the loved ones they left behind, she smiles at him.

Artemis takes her role as protector of young women seriously. There’s a gun tucked into her waistband and a switchblade in her pocket. She can’t save them all, so she has also become an avenging goddess. She can be found in the streets or at battered women’s shelters, preparing for the next hunt.

The gods are dying. The gods wish they were dead. Is immortality a blessing or a curse?

—  The gods were always too human for their divinity (inspired by the writings of @crossroadsbela )
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Trump announces National Oceans Month — but not for the purpose of protecting the oceans

  • On Wednesday, President Donald Trump, keeping with tradition, proclaimed June to be National Ocean Month.
  • Like his predecessors Barack Obama and George W. Bush, Trump acknowledged the vital importance the world’s oceans play in our lives.
  • “National Ocean Month celebrates the mighty oceans and their extraordinary resources,” Trump’s proclamation begins. But it’s after this very first line that he wildly diverts from proclamations past.
  • Trump, in his proclamation, goes on to say that the United States has just begun to “tap the potential of our oceans’ oil and gas, wind, wave, and tidal resources to power the Nation.” Read more (6/1/17)

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A new tarot spread inspired by…. @tarotprose

This one is a shield because they are always stepping in when things get bad and cover us in light and love. They shield us with their words from ourselves and other things.

So due to their actions this spread came about.

This spread is simple. It lets one see how amazing they are, where they get their strength and why others love them and care for them too.

I hope you enjoy

Disclaimer

Mother-of-Pearl

Energy: receptive

Planets: Moon, Neptune

Associated metal: silver

Powers: Protection, wealth

Magical/ritual lore: Mother-of-pearl is the lustrous, opalescent interior of various sea mollusks. Though not a stone, it has been included here because of its long use in magic. Mother-of-pearl has been used in ritual jewelry throughout the ages. Seashells were the medium of exchange (money) in many parts of the world where metals were scarce or lacking, such as Polynesia. 

Since the substance is the product of a living creature- the exterior skeleton, or shell- it is related to the fifth element, Akasha. 

Mystically, it relates to the ocean, to depth, and movement. 

Magical uses: Mother-of-pearl is placed on newborn babies to protect them from the perils of their new existence. It is also a fine substance to use in wealth, money, and riches spells. Empower a bit of mother-of-pearl with your magical needs for money. Anoint it with seawater (which contains gold) or a money drawing oil, such as patchouly or ceder. Place on a silver coin or any piece of silver next to the shell. Wrap a dollar bill or green paper tightly around the mother-of-pearl and silver object, and secure with green string. 

Place this talisman on your alter between two green candles. Let them flame for ten to fifteen minutes while visualizing. Then carry the charm with you. 

(Source: Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Crystal, Gem, and Metal Magic)

The oceans — their sea levels, temperatures and acidity all on the rise — do not read Breitbart News in the United States or the Daily Mail in the United Kingdom, which by spreading science denial put the most vulnerable at risk.
—  Cynthia Barnett’s Op-Ed in the LA Times, read here. 

chrishemsworth: I’ve spent a large part of my life in and around the ocean, it’s where a lot of my happiest memories came from. If I had anxieties or worries I’d head to the ocean and it was always the place where I could reset and be 100% present. My experience in the Maldives made it obvious how our short-term use of plastic has a long-term damaging effect on our oceans. I’m thrilled to be a part of this program, because I want to inspire people to find a solution and protect the world’s oceans so future generations can enjoy them like I do. #100Islandsprotected #Sponsored

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Important message from Mermaid Kelly: Ariel is swimming by to encourage you to help protect her home. Even though she collects human “treasures”, other sea creatures and marine life become injured or even die because of human trash, including thousands of sea turtles, whales, and over one million seabirds each year. All of this trash can harm & entangle fish, sharks, and damages coral reefs. In the Pacific Ocean there is even a huge area called the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch.” This is a large area filled with debris, approximately the size of Texas. The debris extend down 20 feet & contains 3.5 million tons of garbage. It is estimated to double size in the next 5 years. A marine biologist & ocean activist, Sylvia A. Earle once stated “If the ocean dies, we die.” Without the ocean, we can’t survive. Around 50% of the oxygen we breath comes from phytoplankton in the ocean. Many Ocean Activists have already taken action to preserve these creatures and our home, now it’s your turn! You can start taking the steps to helping all of the life in the ocean by using fewer plastic products, recycling, doing local beach/ river clean ups, support local organizations working to protect the ocean, influence change in your local community, but most importantly, educate yourself on the ocean & how to protect it.
This video is also up on my Mermaid Kelly YouTube channel as well! Feel free to share the message and video~
YouTube link: https://youtu.be/PY5tR8E8sZk

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A couple of days ago I had the great luck to swim with a Dugong in the Red Sea, Egypt. The dugong is a medium-sized marine mammal. It is one of four living species of the order Sirenia, which also includes three species of manatees. The dugong is the only strictly marine herbivorous mammal. The dugong is easily distinguished from the manatees by its fluked, dolphin-like tail, but also possesses a unique skull and teeth. Its snout is sharply downturned, an adaptation for feeding in benthic seagrass communities. The molar teeth are simple and peg-like unlike the more elaborate molar dentition of manatees.
Dugongs are found in warm coastal waters from the western Pacific Ocean to the eastern coast of Africa, they are generally found in warm waters around the coast with large numbers concentrated in wide and shallow protected bays.

7 Underwater Facts for World Oceans Day

Today is World Oceans Day, a global day of ocean celebration and collaboration for a better future. A healthy world ocean is critical to our survival. Together, let’s honor, help protect, and conserve the world’s oceans!

1. While the Earth’s oceans are known as five separate entities, there is really only one ocean.

2. The ocean contains upwards of 99% of the world’s biosphere, that is, the spaces and places where life exists.

Both above GIFs are from the TED-Ed Lesson How big is the ocean? - Scott Gass

Animation by 20 steps

3. Jellyfish are soft because they are 95% water and are mostly made of a translucent gel-like substance called mesoglea. With such delicate bodies, jellyfish rely on thousands of venom-containing stinging cells called cnidocytes for protection and prey capture.

From the TED-Ed Lesson How does a jellyfish sting? - Neosha S Kashef

Animation by Cinematic

4. Plastics & litter that make their way into our oceans are swiftly carried by currents, ultimately winding up in huge circulating ocean systems called gyres. The earth has five gyres that act as gathering points, but the largest of all is known as the ‘Great Pacific Garbage Patch’ and has grown so immense that the oceanic garbage patch can shift from around the size of Texas, to something the size of the United States. 

From the TED-Ed Lesson The nurdles’ quest for ocean domination - Kim Preshoff

Animation by Reflective Films

5. The 200 or so species of octopuses are mollusks belonging to the order Cephalopoda, Greek for ‘head-feet’. Those heads contain impressively large brains, with a brain to body ratio similar to that of other intelligent animals, and a complex nervous system with about as many neurons as that of a dog.

From the TED-Ed Lesson Why the octopus brain is so extraordinary - Cláudio L. Guerra

Animation by Cinematic

6. Some lucky animals are naturally endowed with bioluminescence, or the ability to create light. The firefly, the anglerfish, and a few more surprising creatures use this ability in many ways, including survival, hunting, and mating.

From the TED-Ed Lesson The brilliance of bioluminescence - Leslie Kenna

Animation by Cinematic

7. Sea turtles ultimately grow from the size of a dinner plate to that of a dinner table. In the case of the leatherback sea turtle, this can take up to a decade. Happy World Turtle Day!

From the TED-Ed Lesson The survival of the sea turtle - Scott Gass

Animation by Cinematic Sweden

Rogue Scientists Race to Save Climate Data from Trump

  AT 10 AM the Saturday before inauguration day, on the sixth floor of the Van Pelt Library at the University of Pennsylvania, roughly 60 hackers, scientists, archivists, and librarians were hunched over laptops, drawing flow charts on whiteboards, and shouting opinions on computer scripts across the room. They had hundreds of government web pages and data sets to get through before the end of the day—all strategically chosen from the pages of the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration—any of which, they felt, might be deleted, altered, or removed from the public domain by the incoming Trump administration.

  By the end of the day, the group had collectively loaded 3,692 NOAA web pages onto the Internet Archive, and found ways to download 17 particularly hard-to-crack data sets from the EPA, NOAA, and the Department of Energy. Organizers have already laid plans for several more data rescue events in the coming weeks, and a professor from NYU was talking hopefully about hosting one at his university in February. But suddenly, their timeline became more urgent.
  On the day that the Inside EPA report came out, an email from O’Brien popped up on my phone with “Red Fucking Alert” in the subject line.“We’re archiving everything we can.”