protect marine animals

…I am sorry, yet also not sorry. The crack ship has reached its opus.

Seeing as I’ve received no less than five (five!) fanfoal designs for the Bruce/Aerostorm ship (Sharknado shipping), I thought hey, why don’t I do a little design of my own? Just one doodle can’t hurt…And then it exploded into a mini character study sorry

ANYHOO. From top to bottom, moving from left to right:

1.) Just how did Bruce and Stormy have a kid anyway? Magic, of course! Although the spell was supposed to turn Stormy into the mare. Bruce is not fond of his time spent as a lady and doesn’t like to talk about it. Ever. Just one word of advice-never trust a pink and purple haired she-draconequus.
I’m not a big fan of the gender bender trope where even the ugliest dude becomes beautiful when turned female. So Bruce doesn’t look a whole lot different, just smaller and rounder (and angrier and pregnant). In the humanverse, I’d imagine he’d bitch about not being allowed to drink beer and never shave his legs and walk around without a shirt on sometimes (Stormy doesn’t mind that at all)

2.) Lil Wave Rider demonstrates her passion for adventuring, and also wrestling dangerous animals. Bruce is caught somewhere between pride and absolute terror

3-4.) Character studies for the (hypothetical?) daughter of Bruce and Aerostorm, Wave Rider.
Female/Pegasus
Nickname(s): Wave, Wavey, Rider
Special talent: Surfing, treasure hunting
Personality: Wave Rider (or Wave Ridah, as she and Bruce pronounce it) is a mare of adventure. She is bold and fearless, nonchalantly surfing in hurricane weather, deep sea diving for giant pearls, and tracking and studying dangerous beasts, all for the thrill of adventure. She’s a little rough around the edges, as you’re just as likely to find her belching and crushing a soda can on her head as you are of finding her making pretty seashell necklaces with Stormy. Like Bruce, she calls herself a wildlife conservationist and loves and protects all animals (especially marine life, and especially dolphins). Wave can play the ukelele, sing beautifully, eat like a goddamn elephant, and drink a stallion twice her size under the table. She is a good flyer (what would you expect from the granddaughter of Rainbow Dash), but her passion lies in surfing. For Wave, a day out on the water beats a day up in the sky, any day.

5.) I imagine of the two, Stormy would be the super chill parent. He trusts that his daughter can take care of herself. Bruce on the other hand is such a fretting mother hen you don’t even know. It’s sort of justified when you have a daughter that regularly goes treasure hunting in underwater caves and swims with sharks. He often sends Pearlie out to make sure she won’t get into trouble, but Wave resents being treated like a baby and insists she can handle herself.


Whew. Ha. I have obviously put way too much thought into what was supposed to be a one-off , what-if character. Oh well. I had to give my otp a babbu, i just had to
wave rider is only as canon as you’d like her to be
feel free to ship whatever you want

Large, well-established and isolated Marine Protected Areas boost shark numbers

The concept itself probably doesn’t come as a big surprise to a lot of us, but a recent comprehensive study has shown that large, established and well-enforced no take zones show 14 times more more sharks and other sea life than commercial fishing areas.

87 marine protected areas (MPAs) were examined over 40 countries, allowing researchers to determine factors contributing to a successful MPA. Successful MPAs typically had five features: no-take zone, well-enforced, over 10 years old, over 100km-sq, and isolated by sand or deep water

Of course, most of us also know that the majority of MPAs are not successful, and are in fact only token protected areas - they're paper parks, meaning they’re only MPAs on paper. And the sea life in these areas is about on the same level as the sea life in the nearby fishing areas. Which is to say, not great; the study shows a 90% decrease in sharks, and 83% decrease in large fish (with a 63% decrease in fish overall). And that’s pretty scary, because it means a lot of MPAs aren’t achieving their conservation goals, if they have them at all.

But it’s not all bad news. Hopefully, this means the study and ones similar to it could be used in the near future to improve current MPAs, increase the number of successful MPAs and reduce the number of paper parks and MPAs like them. Fingers crossed.

(Also, you can read the paper, published in Nature, here.)