prophet muhammad (saws

Masterpost: Islamic Concepts, Words & Phrases!

So, as promised, here’s the masterpost of the different, most common, types of concepts, words and phrases that we, as Muslims, use in our day to day speak, and perform on the daily. The reason for this masterpost is so that, if and when Season 4 airs, and if it is about Sana, then most likely, these words and phrases, or concepts, may be commonly used/addressed, so it’s always nice to just, have a reference, I guess, of their meaning, so that you can understand the context and definition a little better! 

CONCEPTS.

Islam: The word “Islam” in itself means to submit, to surrender - to give yourself over to Allah, to feel the peace that giving yourself over to Allah brings to you.

Allah: The Arabic word for God.

Muhammad (sal’lalaahu alayhi wasalam): The final prophet sent down by Allah to mankind, with the religion of Islam. (sal’lalaahu alayhi wasalam), or sometimes seen as Muhammad (SAW) means ‘peace be upon him’, which you’ll sometimes see as Muhammad (PBUH). It is an extension we add on to the name Muhammad, whenever the prophet Muhammad (SAW) is being referred to, out of respect.

“The 5 Pillars of Islam”: These are, in essence, the 5 core aspects of Islam, that every Muslim must believe in, and do to their full potential, unless it is detrimental to their health, or they are unable to do so due to a lack of wealth:

  • Shahaadah - This is the very core belief of a Muslim. They “must testify and bear witness that there is no deity but Allah, and that Muhammad (SAW) is his worshipper and messenger.”
  • Salah - The 5 daily prayers, which must be read. These are Fajr (the prayer we read before sunrise), Zauhar (the midday prayer), Asr (the late afternoon prayer), Maghrib (the prayer we read before sunset) and Isha (the night prayer). Each of these prayers are signalled when the Adhaan (the call to prayer) is heard, and before performing these prayers, Wudhu (ablution) must be made.
  • Zakah - Alms, charity. Every year, we must take a portion of money out from our combined wealth that we own to give to charity to the poor and needy. Of course, to do that, Islam sets certain rules on how much wealth you must have in order to classify if whether you are in a position where you can give charity or not.
  • Sawm -  Fasting in the month of Ramadhan. Ramadhan is the 9th month of the Islamic calendar, whereby the start and the end of it is marked by the sighting of the crescent moon. During Ramadhan, Muslims all over the world must fast from sunrise to sunset, abstaining from food, water, sex and sin. They must instead increase their worshipping of Allah, by performing Salah and increasing their Tilaawat (reading of the Qur’aan), Tasbeeh (praising of Allah) and indulge themselves as much as they can within Islam. Suhoor (morning meal) is the meal we eat before sunrise happens, kind of like a breakfast, before we begin our fast for the day, and Iftaar (evening meal) is the meal we eat to break our fast, just as sunset is about to occur. Taraweeh is an additional compulsory Salah that Muslims must pray in Ramadhan (since this Salah is only read during Ramadhan, and in no other month beside it) after the Isha Salah. The end of Ramadhan is marked with Eid ul Fitr, the first of our 2 Eids that we have within the year, a celebration! The fasts in Ramadhan are only compulsory on people that are physically and mentally healthy enough to do them. 
  • Hajj - The 5 day sacred pilgrimage that takes place in the final month of the Islamic calendar, once a year. Muslims all over the world travel to Saudi Arabia, more specifically, Makkah and the surrounding cities near it, to perform their Hajj. Only those that are physically and mentally healthy, and that can afford the Hajj, will find it compulsory on them to do so. Our 2nd Eid, Eid ul Adha is celebrated on the 3rd day of Hajj, by remembering the sacrifice that the Prophets Ibrahim (Abraham) and his son, Ismail (Ishmael) were to make. 

Qur’aan: The Holy Book of Islam. It is considered to be Allah’s final word, and the final, unchanged Holy Book that was sent down via Angel Jibra’eel (Angel Gabriel) to the Prophet Muhammad (SAW). 

Hadeeth: The teachings and sayings of the Prophet Muhammad (SAW) that were reported by his close family and friends.

Sunnah: The beloved actions of the Prophet Muhammad (SAW) that were reported by his close family and friends.

Shari’ah Law: The Islamic ruling. Any Muslim country will most likely be governed by the Shari’ah Law. However, its not just people living in a Muslim state that must abide by the Shari’ah Law. Muslims all over the world must try their best to abide by it too. The Shari’ah Law is based upon the teachings of the Qur’aan, which hold the most weight in Islam, with a little understanding from the Hadeeth and Sunnah, in terms of how to apply these Laws.

Jihad: The word itself means to struggle, to battle. There are 2 types:

  • Jihad Kabeera: The Greater Struggle/Battle - this is the one we as Muslims face on a daily basis, within ourselves, to better ourselves as believers of Allah, to always do the right thing by Islam, which is something that affects us on a daily basis, especially if we live in the West, since we face the battle of living in the Western society, as well as being Muslims, and choosing to do the right thing. 
  • Jihad Sagheera: The Lesser Struggle/Battle - this is the one where we proactively, as Muslims, must fight against anyone who wrongfully says ill about Islam. In it, we must take care that we are not hurting those, who have not hurt us, but rather, that we fight against the common prejudices, stigmas and stereotypes that are placed on Islam and Muslims. 

Hijaab: The headpiece the women of Islam are recognised by. However, hijaab is not just that. Hijaab is also in the way we dress modestly, the way we must act modestly, the way we must speak modestly, because the woman’s modesty in Islam is very, very highly valued and respected. Men are told lower their gazes in front of women. 

Niqaab: The face veil that some, not all, but some Muslim women choose to wear, if they want to.

Burqa: The long material that covers the head and reaches thigh length, that some women, again, choose to wear, if they don’t want to wear the Hijaab, but something a bit more looser and covering.

Abayah: The long “dress” the women wear, on top of their usual clothes. Most of the times, these are black, with several printed or embroidered designs on them for more fancier wear, or sometimes they are simple, for more everyday wear. Not all women wear an abayah, and not every abayah is black in colour.

Thobe/Jubbah: Kind of like an abayah, but for men? I guess? It’s a long stitched garment, that comes in many different colours, mostly neautrals, like white, gray, beige, black, blues, greens etc, that men wear. Muslim men in the East wear this more frequently than Muslim men in the West, but Muslim men in the West would most likely wear this on Friday, Ramadhan, and Eid - on sacred occasions.

Dua: Prayers. So, when you raise your hands and pray to Allah, and ask anything of him and remember the people who you want to remember in your prayers to Allah.

Jummah: It means Friday, which is the holy day for Muslims. Kind of like Sabbath, I guess. On Fridays, instead of the Zauhar prayer, men normally go to the Masjid (the mosque) to offer Jummah Salah (The Friday Prayer), where the Imam (the person leading the prayer) will give a Kutbah (a short sermon) regarding a specific topic to do with Islam.

Masjid: The Mosque. This is where Muslims gather to pray Salah 5 times a day.

Madressah: Islamic schooling - so, Islamic classes that, most often, take place inside the Masjid, i.e, the mosque, when it is not being used by the general Muslim public to offer Salah.

WORDS & PHRASES.

As-salaamu’alaikum Warahmatullahi Wabarakaatuhu: This is a greeting, both used as a hello and a goodbye between Muslims. As-salaamu’alaikum - May peace be upon you, Warahmatullahi - And Allah’s mercy, Wabarakaatuhu - And his blessings. Usually though, most people will only say/use As-salaamu’alaikum.

Allah Hafiz: May Allah protect you. This is another greeting we have that Muslims use as a goodbye.

Bismillah hirahmaa niraheem: In the name of Allah, the most Merciful, the Most Kind. It’s a phrase we use/say when we’re about to start something, we start whatever we do in the name of Allah, by remembering him so that whatever we’re doing will have a successful outcome. Somtimes, we just say Bismillah, in short, which just means, In the Name of Allah.

Subhanallah: Glory be to Allah. This is a Tasbeeh (a praise of Allah) that is said when something overwhelms you, so much so, that you literally have to take a moment and glorify Allah for having that thing overwhelm you, whether it be someone’s beauty, something’s beauty, or something that’s happened that’s overwhelmed you in a really positive way.

Alhamdulillah: All praises be to Allah. This is a Tasbeeh that’s said when you’re thankful for something. Thankful for anything or anyone, for food, for good health, after we sneeze we say Alhamdulillah, or if someone is asking you how you are, you can simply reply back by saying Alhamdulillah, and they’ll understand that you are in good health, or if someone is offering you something extra, like food, for example, then you can simply say Alhamdulillah, and they’ll understand that you’re content with the amount you have.

Allahu Akbar: Allah is the Greatest. This is another Tasbeeh, but it’s used in quite versatile ways. It’s the first and last phrases of the Adhaan, it’s said in Salah, but it’s also used in daily speak too, most often when we want to reaffirm our belief in Allah, to remind ourselves that, Allah is our sole keeper of destiny, and that, sometimes, things we don’t anticipate can happen too. It’s a resounding statement of faith, that can invoke feelings of strength when it is needed, telling you to reevaluate where your faith is at. Or if something that you can’t believe is happening, you’ll say Allahu Akbar, to express your disbelief in it.

Insha’allah: If Allah wills. This is something we say when we’re thinking about the future, and we hope that the way we think about the future is something Allah is willing to offer us. Kind of like a “I don’t wanna jinx it”.

Mash’allah: Allah has willed. This is something we say out of respect for a situation, if it’s gone in favour of someone else we’re speaking to, or if we’re appreciating someone, whether it be their beauty or their character. It’s a way of showing someone that you’re extremely happy that Allah has willed for something to go their way. 

Wallah: I swear by Allah. It’s something you say when you’re absolutely serious about something, because you are swearing to Allah about it, you are keeping Allah as your witness about it.

Astagfirullah: I seek forgiveness from Allah. This is said when you’re repenting to Allah, or someone else may say this to you if they’re reminding you of something wrong that you did/are doing, not as a way to patronise, but to remind you that you have a choice in not doing that wrong thing either.

Jazakallah Khair: May Allah reward you with the best (of rewards). This is said in place of thank you, when you’re thanking someone for something, Most people sometimes just say Jazakallah, or either Baarakallah (May Allah’s blessings be upon you.)

Ameen: Amen. Something you say when you’re agreeing with something, or accepting something from someone.

Mubarak: Glad tidings/Congratulations. Usually you’ll hear people say this in Ramadhan or Eid, to each other, or if someone tells someone else they’re going for Hajj/have come back from Hajj, you’ll hear the phrases:  Ramadhan Mubarak, Eid Mubarak, Hajj Mubarak etc, but generally, it’s just used as way of saying congrats.

Nikah: Wedding.The actual wedding ceremony.

Ammi: Mum.

Abba: Dad.

Habibi/Habibti: The Most Beloved. Where Habibi is the masculine term, and Habibti is the feminine term. It’s not just said to the person you love romantically, it can be said platonically too, and quite often, is.

i’m gonna try and explain this situation, from my point of view. let me reiterate: i am not speaking for all muslims here. i am not speaking for all muslims here. but i, as a girl who is muslim, am speaking from my knowledge and point of view. there will be muslims who will disagree with me, just like how there will be non muslims who will too. i already know this.

but … i’m just putting what my beliefs are about this whole situation, as a muslim girl, out there:

yousef isn’t muslim. sana is muslim. sana clearly likes yousef. for some muslims, the fact that yousef isn’t a muslim, wouldn’t be a huge issue. they’d still be okay to date/marry their non muslim partner.

however, for some muslims (and i’m saying this with my point of view put into this too), dating/marrying a non muslim, is a huge issue. a huge, huge, huge issue, both religiously speaking, because there is a clash of faith/no faith, and also culturally speaking too, where in which, people will point fingers. but hey, people point fingers all the time anyway. so, let’s remove the culture factor.

religiously speaking, practising muslims find it extremely important that their partner is muslim too. for some muslims, this isn’t even something that is negotiable. we can’t compromise on that. faith comes first for us. 

the prophet muhammad (saw) said once, “when Allah’s servant marries, he has completed one half of the religion. thereafter, let him fear Allah regarding the remaining half.”

let me explain what that above hadeeth means. if our partner is muslim too, it makes life a whole lot more easier, a lot less simple, but also, because with our partner, the 2 of us can motivate each other, and help each other, and support each other when our imaan (faith) and deen (religion) isn’t as strong as we would like it to be. we become each other’s motivation. we become each other’s rock. we become each other’s inspiration. 

and that’s the whole essence, and beauty, for a muslim having a partner who is muslim too, that we may wish to marry, and further deepen our bond with.

sana, according to her beliefs, needs for her partner to be muslim too. that is something she doesn’t wish to compromise on.

yousef, isn’t muslim. he doesn’t believe in Allah. 

so where does that leave sana, who is really starting to like yousef?

yousef could revert back into islam, if he was muslim before, or he could convert, and things could work out for them 2. some people though, may not feel that that is an adequate enough reason to accept islam back into your life again - just for the sake of someone else. if you’re wanting to come into islam, then it should be because you want to, for the sake of Allah, for the sake of worshipping Allah, not for anybody else. because your islam is between you and Allah to have, that should be the reason, not any other, for wanting to convert/revert. so, yousef reverting/converting, would have to be something that’s not just solely because of sana, but because he WANTS to accept islam, for the sake of himself and Allah, and strengthening that bond again. 

of course, some people will say that yousef converting/reverting to islam for sana could be a good thing too, if, say, after he does accept islam, he fully accepts islam into his life, and believes in Allah too, and practices islam as much or as little as he wants, but that he believes in Allah, that is the main thing. 

otherwise? i’m not too sure how this is going to work for sana and yousef, if neither sana wants to change her stance on compromising (which, personally, i can’t see her doing), and neither does yousef want to become muslim (again) and believe in allah. 

but yeah, let’s see what happens.

Kutipan-kutipan Buku Aisyah: Wanita yang Hadir dalam Mimpi Rasulullah

“Jangan buat Aisyah sedih,” katanya.
Itulah… sekali lagi dia memanggil ku dengan namaku. Sebenarnya, saat itu kepalaku tertunduk, keningku dipenuhi banyak pikiran. Aku tak memandang wajah seseorang pun, tapi kalimat pendek itu… “Jangan buat Aisyah sedih,” membuatku tertegun. (Pg. 75)

“Kau… telah diperlihatkan kepadaku dalam mimpiku.” Rasulullah berkata seperti ini kepadaku. (Pg. 88)

Tidur nyenyak Rasulullah lebih manis daripada madu, selalu terlihat menyenangkan hati. Aku takut melepaskan tangannya ketika tertidur. Bila terbangun tengah malam, aku mencari-cari dengan tanganku yang gemetaran. Kedua mataku terbakar seperti orang buta bila tak menemukannya. Aku menangis seperti orang buta. Setiap kali ketika ujung jariku menyentuhnya, ah… di waktu tanganku tak bisa memegang tangannya untuk menemukan dirinya di gelap malam. (Pg. 94)

Kerinduan… aku tahu apa itu kerinduan di hari-hari hijrah. Aku bersyukur kepada Allah yang telah memberikan kerinduan ini kepadaku, yang mengubahnya sebagai sekolah diri. Kedewasaan, tumbuh besar untuk orang lain tak hanya di masa-masa awal kanak-kanak. Berapa pun umur kita, musibah-musibah yang menimpa diri kita merupakan petualangan kedewasaan sebagai jalan pengajaran.

“Perpisahan ini menjadi tabir bagi Aisyah,” ucap ibuku.

“Perpisahan ini adalah mahkota pengantin, mahar bagi Aisyah,” ujar ibuku untuk meringankan bebanku. (Pg. 121)

Kebenaran itu seperti berkah yang terpancar dari niat tulus seindah gunung-gunung, tanpa menanti balasan apapun. Kebenaran ialah ketulusan di dalam senyap-senyap burung yang kelelahan terbang, keledai-keledai yang menyimpan susu, seluruh sayap dan hewan berkaki empat, sampai kepada para pengembara dan orang-orang lemah.

Kebenaran merupakan balasan yang bersih.

Kebenaran… sebuah pernikahan. Mahar. Kebenaran kata-kata.
(Pg. 142)

Rasulullah tersenyum. Setiap senyum Rasulullah bagiku adalah hari pernikahanku. (Pg. 142)

Kakakku bertanya kepada Rasulullah, “Jika seseorang menolak karena rasa sopan santun meskipun sebenarnya menginginkannya, kemudian mengucapkan terima kasih, apakah itu juga dihitung dan dicatat sebagai kebohongan, ya Rasulullah?”

Rasulullah sekali lagi menjawab pertanyaan itu dengan senyum. “Kebohongan tetap akan tercatat sebagai kebohongan.”
(Pg. 146)

Dia memanggil ku “Uwais!” ketika dirinya bahagia. Beliau suka memainkan hidungku sambil memanggil, “Aisyahku.” Saat dirinya lelah, beliau berkata, “Bicaralah wahai Humaira.” Begitu aku berbicara ke sana-kemari seperti arus air, raut-raut sedih di wajahnya hilang satu per satu.

Ketika menatap, dia seakan-akan melihat darah yang mengalir di pembuluh darahku. Luar dan dalamku satu bagi Rasulullah. Seluruh kewanitaanku, kecemburuanku, kemanjaanku, keingintahuanku, dan ketidaksabaranku terlihat jelas.

Bila berusaha menarik perhatian ku, dia akan berkata, “Wahai putri Abu Bakar, bukankah ini seperti ini…” atau “Wahai putri Ash-Shidiq, bukan seperti itu, tapi seperti ini.” Ketika membicarakan diriku pada orang lain dan Rasulullah berkata begini, “Ibu kalian hari ini berkata seperti ini…” itu berarti ada sesuatu hal yang aku perlu ubah.

Rasulullah menjelaskan satu per satu kepadaku, sabar mendengarkan ku, berbagi kebahagiaan ku. Tanpa kusadari, Rasulullah mengajari diriku seperti seorang murid. Sementara itu, aku selalu rindu kepada Rasulullah meskipun berada di sisinya. Aku tak bisa melewati hidup tanpa Rasulullah ketika aku tidur di sampingnya. Bahkan ketika kedua mataku tertutup pun aku menghitung satu per satu hela napasnya. (Pg. 148)

Aku tak pernah makan melebihi apa yang dimakan Rasulullah. Aku takut dan menjauhi hal-hal duniawi. Apa yang kami dapatkan dari hal duniawi, apa yang bisa kami lakukan dengan api. Rasulullah sudah merupakan sumber kehangatan dan sinar bagi kami.” (Pg. 152)

Tanpa Rasulullah, aku seperti seorang anak kecil yang menggigil kedinginan dalam kegelapan. Kadang-kadang bila malam hari ketika harus berpisah dengan Rasulullah, aku ingin pergi dari dunia ini. Tanpa Rasulullah, udara tak berembus. Pagi tak kunjung tiba di hari-hari tanpa dirinya. Cinta Rasulullah adalah oase di tengah-tengah padang pasir. Sebuah oase yang terpancar dari surga. Bayangkan sendiri apa yang terjadi jika terjadi perpisahan. (Pg. 152)

“Aisyahku, aku tahu kapan kau marah kepadaku.”

“Bagaimana mungkin aku marah kepadamu, ya Rasulullah?”

Dia menyentuh lembut daguku dan menatap dalam-dalam kedua mataku sambil tersenyum.

“Ketika kau benar-benar marah kepadaku, kau berkata, ya Tuhannya Ibrahim, sementara kalau kau baik kepadaku, kau akan berkata, ya Tuhannya Muhammad. (Pg. 156)

Rasulullah tersenyum sambil memainkan hidungku.
“Bicaralah wahai Humaira…”

Dan aku sering bertanya kepada Rasulullah, “Apakah engkau mencintaiku?”

“Iya…”

Aku terdiam sebentar, tapi terasa lama seperti beribu-ribu tahun. Dia menggelengkan kepalanya, mengajak aku berbicara.

“Seberapa besar engkau mencintaiku?”
“Seperti titik-titik yang terlempar ke kain sutra…”
“Maksudnya…”
“Seperti titik-titik yang tak terlihat…”

Jawaban ini seperti sebuah bintang yang dalam seribu tahun sekali turun ke dalam hatiku, penuh dengan cinta.
Kadang-kadang bintangku jatuh. Aku ingin memperbaharui cintaku dengan kata-kata. Dalam bentuk isyarat aku bertanya kepada Rasulullah yang berada dalam kerajaan cinta, “Bagaimana dengan titik kita yang tak terlihat?”

Sambil tersenyum dia menjawab: “Seperti hari pertama…” (Pg. 194)

Para pemuda suka bertanya kepadaku mengenai diri Rasulullah. Aku malah balik bertanya begini kepada mereka, “Apa kalian tak pernah membaca Alquran? Rasulullah itu adalah Alquran yang berjalan.”

Perkataan Rasulullah itu seperti penerang yang terang-benderang. Ia membuka cakrawala. (Pg. 202)

Aku selalu merasakan bahwa hujan itu bermaksud menghapus seluruh kesedihan manusia. Ia memadamkan kobara api kesedihan, rasa letih peperangan, dan rasa asing… (Pg. 251)

Lantas Rasulullah balik bertanya lagi kepada para sahabat: “Menurut kalian dari sisi keimanan siapakah yang paling kuat?”

“Para malaikat ya Rasulullah…”

“Malaikat memang diciptakan untuk beribadah kepada Allah.”

“Para nabi ya Rasulullah…”

“Wahyu turun kepada para nabi dari Allah…”

“Kalau begitu para sahabat…”

“Kalian adalah para sahabat yang bertemu dan berbicara secara langsung dengan nabi kalian…”

“Kalau begitu siapakah itu orang-orang yang beriman kuat ya Rasulullah?”

“Umatku di akhir zaman yang beriman kepadaku dan mencintaiku tanpa mengenalku dan melihatku.”

Mencintai Rasulullah segenap hati, beriman kepadanya, berusaha berjalan di jalannya, merupakan martabat iman yang paling tinggi.
(Pg. 255)

Sering kami berdua bekerja bersama-sama. Misalnya, ketika aku memintal kain wol, dia memperbaiki sandal-sandal kulit. Ketika aku memasak, Rasulullah mengambilkan kantung air yang tergantung di tembok dan mengisinya dengan air. Masakan kami tak pernah lepas dari tanaman-tanaman beraroma. Aku membaca Alquran dari hapalanku, sementara Rasulullah mendengarkan aku. (Pg. 264)

Suatu hari mendadak seorang Badui datang menemui Rasulullah di masjid. Ternyata dia telah menempuh perjalanan panjang untuk sampai ke sini. Entah siapa yang tahu persis bagaimana mereka menceritakan mengenai diri Rasulullah kepadanya. Dia masuk ke masjid dan setelah beberapa saat menatap Rasulullah badannya mulai bergemetar. Aku mendengarkan seluruh kejadian itu dari kamarku.

“Jangan takut,” ucap Rasulullah kepada orang Badui itu. “Aku bukan raja. Aku putra seorang perempuan Quraish yang makan daging dikeringkan di bawah sinar matahari.” (Pg. 277)

“Apakah kau mencintai Aisyah?”

“Iya, aku mencintai Aisyah…”

“Bolehkah aku bertanya satu pertanyaan lagi?”

Sekali lagi dia menganggukkan kepala sambil tersenyum. Seakan-akan bintang-bintang bertaburan di kepalanya ingin mendengarkan pembicaraan kami.

“Bagaimana engkau mencintai Aisyah?”

Beliau malah terdiam seperti malu. Beban hidup dirinya sudah sangat berat. Dia adalah seorang jendral. Hatiku sesak ketika dia malah mempercepat langkah untanya maju untuk pergi. Sungguh terlalu banyak pertanyaan yang aku utarakan.

Mengapa aku melakukan hal ini? Mungkin mati lebih baik bagiku…

Kemudian dia menunduk seakan-akan tahu bahwa aku menatapnya. Entah bagaimana mendadak dia memutar balik untanya dan memacu cepat-cepat dan berkata kepadaku, “Seperti hari pertama…”

Kemudian dia mengangkat tangannya tinggi-tinggi ke udara memberikan salam kepadaku dengan pesona seorang pejuang yang mendapatkan kemenangan
, lantas berputar cepat menuju ke arah pasukan yang berada di barisan paling depan. (Pg. 287-288)

“Sungguh! Aku tak akan berterima kasih kepada kalian maupun kepadanya. Aku hanya bersyukur dan berterima kasih kepada Allah yang telah menurunkan ayat mengenai diriku dan telah menjauhkan diriku dari fitnah-fitnah itu.” (Pg. 316, setelah akhirnya turun ayat dari Allah kepada Rasulullah yang membuktikan kesucian Aisyah dari fitnah karena “Kalung”.)

Dunia selalu membuat pusing dan tak pernah berhenti bagi orang Mukmin. Bagaimana mungkin bisa berhenti? Dunia merupakan penjara, gelanggang tempat ujian, bagi orang beriman. (Pg. 333)

“Jika kalian memang benar-benar seperti yang kalian katakan, aku akan mengajarkan lima hal lagi sehingga perilaku baik kalian menjadi dua puluh.”

“Silahkan ya Rasulullah!”

“Jangan kau kumpulkan apa yang tidak kalian makan. Jangan dirikan bangunan yang tidak kalian tinggali. Jangan berselisih satu sama lain karena perbedaan. Jauhilah hal-hal yang tak diperintahkan oleh Allah. Berlombalah dalam kebaikan.”

Rasulullah juga sering menasihati kami seperti yang dia lakukan kepada para utusan.

“Dunia adalah tempat ujian yang melelahkan,” ucapnya.
“Selain dari orang yang menjauhi larangan Allah, mereka takkan selamat dari tangan-tangan dunia.” (Pg. 346)

‘Ya Umar!’ ucapnya. ‘Kau bertanya soal bekas anyaman dalam tubuhku, padahal kelembutan setelah sesuatu yang keras itu sangat nyaman. Kau sedih karena atap ruangan ini pendek, padahal atap kuburan akan lebih pendek daripada ini. Kita meninggalkan hal duniawi ini kepada ahli dunia, sementara itu mereka menyerahkan akhirat kepada kita. Aku dan dunia itu seperti tentara berkuda yang melakukan perjalanan di tengah musim panas. Tentara berkuda yang letih karena terik panas matahari itu berteduh di bawah pohon, kemudian melanjutkan perjalanan dan meninggalkan tempat itu. Kisra dan Kaisar adalah seorang raja, sementara aku seorang nabi. Aku hanyalah hamba Allah. Aku duduk seperti seorang hamba, makan seperti seorang hamba…’ (Pg. 393)

“Ada berapa emas, Aisyah? Di mana kau menaruhnya?”

Aku lari membawa emas itu kepadanya. Aku seperti juru tulisnya. Rasulullah mengambil emas dari tanganku kemudian mulai menghitung.

“Lima… enam… tujuh…”

Rasulullah menaruh emas-emas itu di telapak tanganku kemudian menutupi dengan jemarinya. “Selama emas ini berada di sini…” katanya.

Kedua mataku terbuka, menatap kedua mata Rasulullah.

“Selama emas ini berada di sini… bagaimana Muhammad bisa pergi ke hadapan Allah?”

Anak panah terlepas dari busurnya, tertancap tepat di tengah-tengah dadaku. Tubuhku membeku. Lidahku tertelan sambil bersandar. Tubuhku mulai bergerak mundur. Seakan-akan dunia berada di tanganku dan tanganku seakan-akan hilang karena beratnya.

“Ambillah ini semua, segera infakkan emas ini…” ucap Rasulullah.
(Pg. 425)

Aku adalah Aisyah di masa-masa sulit.

Aku tak pernah merasakan pernikahan lagi selama masa-masa hijrah.

Hari pernikahanku yang sebenarnya adalah hari wafatku, hari ketika aku bertemu dengan rahmat seluruh alam, Rasulullah, orang yang aku cintai.

Aku bersaksi pada perintah Allah, kenangan Rasulullah, wasiat dan amanah Alquran, tidak ada Tuhan melainkan Allah, dan Muhammad adalah hamba dan utusan-Nya.

Aku adalah Aisyah.

Aku adalah Aisyahnya Muhammad.
(Last page)




Membaca kisah Rasulullah dari sudut pandang dan kacamata Aisyah, seperti membaca sebuah diary dan surat cinta dari seorang istri untuk mengenang sosok suami tercintanya :)

MENA people really seem to not give a crap about ethnic and religious minorities within their region tbh. A lot of them cry about Islamophobia in the West (and rightfully so) but don’t really care that many Muslim majority countries pretty much treat non-Muslim minorities as second-class citizens. How Coptic Christians get treated in Egypt, for example, is awful. There is growing religious intolerance and a rise of sectarian violence. Many moved to the west as a result. Armenians and Kurdish minorities face persecution in Turkey, and there are still many political prisoners. In Iraq, the Shia prime minister pretty much only cares about protecting his own sect and disregards everyone else. Many Iraqis are also really racist against Kurdish people and see them as inferior, and often uphold the stereotype that they have low IQ and are not intelligent enough to be able to even run their own country, so that is often used to say that the Kurdish shouldn’t have their own sovereignty. In Saudi Arabia, they literally do not allow churches there, even though it’s the land of Prophet Muhammad (SAW) - he clearly taught that Christians and their places of worship should be respected. Lets not even get started on the anti-Semitism, and how under the ba'ath Saddamist regime in Iraq, so many Iraqi Jews were displaced and forced to move to Isr**l. Today there are only four Iraqi Jews living in Iraq.

When all of this is said, MENA people tend to scream “This is Western propaganda!” No it isn’t, sit down.

(Points from Ibn Al Qayyim’s book ‘Removing of Mental blocks’) 

1.    It is a direct order by Allah Subhanahu wata'ala 

2.    Allah will in return give you more than what you expected 

3.    Allah will raise you in status to angelic levels

4.    You add 10 Hasanat to your good deeds

5.    Allah Subhanahu wata'ala will raise you 10 levels higher

6.    You will get 10 Mercies from Allah Subhanahu wata'ala

7.    10 of your sins are forgiven by Allah Subhanahu wata'ala

8.    The likelihood of the dua that you make for yourself being accepted increases

9.    It is a means to receive intercession by the Prophet Muhammad (saw)

10.  Salawat is like making Istighfar

11.  Sending Salawat will satisfy your worldly needs in this duniya

12.  It compensates for charity if you are financially unable to give charity

13.  It is a means of angels sending Salaam on your behalf

14.  It is a purifier of your intentions

15.  It is a means of receiving glad tidings, that you have a place reserved for you in Jannah

16.  It is a means of protection from terror on the day of judgement

17.  It is a means of being greeted by the Prophet Muhammad (saw) himself

18.  In a gathering, it is a means of purifying that meeting / gathering and a means of preventing any evil talk

19.  It helps you remember what you forgot

20.  It is a means of safe guarding you from poverty

21.  It removes stinginess from your heart

22.  It protects you from the evil of others

23.  It keeps you firm on the Sirat Ul Mustiqeem

24.  Sending Salawat daily will keep you firm on the straight path

25.  It perfects any speech

26.  It is a means of light in the darkness of the day of judgement

27.  It gives you better character, refines your akhlaq and softens the heart

28.  It is a means of earning the love of Allah Subhanahu wata'ala

29.  It is a protection from the Wrath of Allah SWT

30.  It increases your barakah

31.  It brings Rahmah into your heart

32.  It increases the Prophet’s love to you

33.  It increases your love to RasuluAllah SAW

34.  It lengthen ones life

35.  Your name will be mentioned to RasuluAllah SAW

36.  It is RasuluAllah SAW’s right upon you

37.  It assists in being brought out of Jahannam

38.  It mentioned the Dhikr of Allah.. (Allahumma…)

39.  According to your level of sincerity, it will measure our distance to the Prophet salallahu ‘alaihi wassalam in Jannah.

come on julie, pull through and deliver the goods. my door is open. i’m all ears, have been since 16th december 2016.

tell me about even and islam.

his past with it. his current, present stance on it. would he like to revisit it and go back to it now, with sana/the balloon squad? what are his thoughts about islam right now? where does he place himself alongside it? is he at peace? does he feel shame and like his last attempts to connect with islam are invalid? does he want someone to talk to about it with in the form of long deep discussions? does he have questions? is he still curious? what does he remember? the drawings and the sketches? “not all muslims are terrorists”? learning the qur'aan in arabic? what are his thoughts on converting? would he ever? would he never? what did islam mean to him then? what does islam mean to him now? if he was to hear the qur'aan be recited in front of him, or see someone pray salah in front of him, or mention Allah or ramadhan or the Prophet Muhammad (SAW) or mention about a masjid … what would his reaction be? a smile showing a feeling of familiarity, or eyes wide in an overwhelming feeling of appreciation?

there’s so … many … questions i have.

and i’m ready. pen and paper in my hand ready to note it all down and analyse the hell out of it. i /need/ answers.

Nobody abuses people verbally that doesn’t get it back from Allah. I can’t tell you how many times i’ve observed people with sharp tongues end up getting humbled by Allah. We need to be very careful about humiliating each other.

 “A Muslim is the one who avoids harming Muslims with his tongue and hands.”-Prophet Muhammad SAW

Ways to grow your soul

Recitation of the Quran is the first thing you need to do to grow your soul. Within the sunnah you see a strong emphasis on recitation. Any human being who wants to attain closeness to Allah needs to open the Quran and read it. If you don’t do it, you have lost the most powerfool tool to grow ur soul. For every letter that’s recited you receive ten rewards. If you read the translation and commentary only, perhaps you should make an effort to learn to read the Arabic because the reward that is mentioned in the Quran and the hadith has nothing to do with translation, it has to do with articulation.

Salawat on the Prophet (saw) is the second thing that would help your soul grow. It fulfills the mandate of the Quran: 

إِنَّ اللَّهَ وَمَلَائِكَتَهُ يُصَلُّونَ عَلَى النَّبِيِّ يَا أَيُّهَا الَّذِينَ آمَنُوا صَلُّوا عَلَيْهِ وَسَلِّمُوا تَسْلِيمًا 
 "Verily Allah and His angels send blessings on the Prophet, O you who believe! Send you also blessings on him, and salute him with submission”. [33:56]

This is the only act of worship that Allah says that I do, my angels do it so you should also do it. By doing so, you don’t benefit rasoolAllah (saw) in anyway. It is a reflexive act: you send salawat on rasoolAllah, it reflects back with ten salawat on you. You bring blessings upon yourself and it gets presented to rasoolAllah. It connects you to the Prophet (saw) and its barakah will connect your hearts. If you can’t do it abundantly, even once in the morning and once in the evening would be sufficient for ur soul to grow.

It’tibah-e-sunnah is the third thing that causes your soul to grow. It’tibah-e-sunnah means internalizing the following of rasoolAllah (saw). Following his sunnah is the magnet that draws Allah’s love, and Allah’s love is the most tasty food for our souls. By following him, what we are doing is turning on our magnet so that it attracts Allah’s love.
For every sunnah that you follow you end up making yourself that much more beautiful to Allah. Prophet Muhammad (saw) said: “Allah is beautiful and He loves beauty.” [Muslim :911]
Therefore, what attracts the attention of Allah is the sunnah. When you put on makeup and dress all pretty, you might be attracting the attention of others around you but to attract the love of Allah, we require the sunnah, and ecstasy lies in finding in every tiny sunnah of rasoolAllah and following that sunnah from head to toe, from heart to soul.

Notes from a lecture by Shaykh Dr Hussain.

anonymous asked:

Hey, I am a gay girl born into a Muslim family. The only time I was ever "religious" was as a kid when I was first learning about Islam. Growing up, I went through a lot and started losing faith. Now I feel like I cannot go back to the religion even if I wanted to because of my sexuality. I will never be accepted. I also feel like Islam prioritizes men and as a feminist that goes against what I believe in. Is there still room for me in this religion or should I start searching for another faith?

Hey so I crowdsourced a lot of this answer: [updating as I get more suggestions and resources]

Personally, I couldn’t be a Muslim and follow Islam if I didn’t find it feminist, full of social justice and intersectional. Unfortunately patriarchy and self interest tries to pass itself off as moralistic and religious —this is universal. Also it’s helpful to keep in mind that if any authority tries to tell you to hate and discriminate know that it isn’t from God or any moral compass—but fear. 

O you who have attained to faith! Be ever steadfast in upholding equity, bearing witness to the truth for the sake of God, even though it be against your own selves or your parents and kinsfolk. Whether the person concerned be rich or poor, God’s claim takes precedence over [the claims of] either of them. Do not, then, follow your own desires, lest you swerve from justice: for if you distort [the truth], behold, God is indeed aware of all that you do!

- The Holy Qur’an [4:135]

I believe the Prophet Muhammad [saw] was a radical-feminist-environmental anti-racist community organizer, activist and freedom fighter that believed in freeing people from the status quo and freeing them from oppression through Islam and Allah [swt]. And I believe in following that tradition.

“Truly, God does not change the condition of a people until they change what is in themselves.” (Quran 13:11)

———————————————————————————

About Lot/Lut:

Omar Pitras Waqar is working on a mechanical translation of the Qur’an without the diacriticals/vowels [which were added years after Muhammad’s death and during Uthman’s reign] says:

“…possibilities of this being reference to djinn/human interbreeding… or that it may have had to do with getting DNA, from angles/extraterrestrials which is still vile in a non consensual sense. Quran says the “sin” was something no creature had done before in all of the worlds (plural) so that rules out homosexual and gender variance which can be easily observed on earth in plants and animals let alone any number of beings from other planets or dimensions.”

More to support this: "Indeed, homosexuality was outside the mainstream of early rabbinic thought. It wasn’t until the New Testament and Palestinian reinterpretation of Genesis 19 that it became a significant theme. Some scholars explain this shift by citing intervening events. One was the apocryphal Book of Jubilees. In this book, it was alleged that the Sodomites had created a race of giants by having sexual relations with a group of gods, the “Watchers,” who lusted after mortal women. For this, the Sodomites were punished. The notion of “crime against nature” is a vestigial remnant of this legend, but also has scriptural roots.“ [from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/georgette-bennett-phd/sodom-and-gomorrah-revisited_b_2624684.html] Our Ethiopian Christian family has been maintaining this and other apocryphal texts many of which are repeated in the Quran like the story of Jesus turning clay birds into real living birds.

I am going to give an example of how much diacriticals/vowels make a difference.

1. From Quran.com
Surat Ash-Shu'ara [verse 165 - “Do you approach males among the worlds.“

2. Notice: “Worlds” possibly referring that’s some unseen/alien/jinn

3. Also the arabic word used for “males” could also be translated into “mates” or “rods”

4. “Do you approach mates among the worlds.” or “Do you approach rods among the worlds.” are possible translations

———————————————————————————-

I believe it was Aisha [ra] that had a close friend that was a hijra and didn’t wear a hijab, or covering around them. There was plenty of queer people in and around the Prophet Muhammad’s [s] life time.

I could name-drop Sufi saints [ahem, Rumi loved a man Shams] and poets from various times and places who violated norms of gender and sexuality on one level or another. Ali ibn Hamzah al-Asadi, more widely known as al-Kisa’i al-Kufi (d.804). As the transmitter of one of the Qur’an’s seven harfs (“readings”) in Sunni tradition, he’s an immeasurably important figure in the history of the Qur’an as a text. As such, his knowledge and character were both under close examination. In one assessment, al-Marzubani, speaking on the authority Ibn al-Arabi (the jurist, not the mystic), described al-Kisa’i as “one of the most learned persons” while adding that al-Kisa’i openly confessed to engaging in acts that included same-sex relations. “Yet,” he adds, al-Kisa’i remained “an accurate reader, knowledgeable in the Arabic language, and honest.” 

This does not answer all questions, but it offers something. In Sunni Islam, there are seven canonical ways of reading the Qur’an. Al-Kisa’i al-Kufi is the man who gave us one of them. He devoted his life to knowing and teaching the Qur’an. It should go without saying that al-Kisa’i al-Kufi memorized the entire scripture by heart and recited it every day of his life. Along the way, he apparently fucked dudes. The lips that he used to recite divine scripture also touched men.

““O people, we created you all from a male and female
And made you into different communities and different tribes
So that you should come to know one another
Acknowledging that the most noble among you 
Is the one most aware of God
Qur’an 49:13


The most noble is the one most aware of God. This is not just incitement for all Muslims to increase their awareness of God – it is also a warning to pursue a policy of social tolerance. The implication of this verse is that no Muslim is better than another because of any of the social categories that we use to classify ourselves, such as race, ethnicity, economic class, or gender. Or even sexual orientation. A gay or lesbian Muslim is no less than a heterosexual Muslim, except by the intangible criterion of pious awareness of God (taqwa). A transgender

Muslim is no less than other Muslims who have not struggled with their own gender identity and faced the stigma of changing gender classification, except by awareness of God. 

Most Muslims cherish reciting this verse to oppose the evils of racial superiority, ethnic chauvinism, and class arrogance. Yet some see this verse as a call to justice that rings far beyond its terse words.”
— Scott Siraj al-Haqq Kugle, HOMOSEXUALITY IN ISLAM

El-Farouk Khaki, the founder of Salaam [a queer Muslim organization in Canada] says:  you can connect her w me, or with Daayiee Abdullah. my email is elfin925@rogers.com she can also join https://www.facebook.com/groups/99769188589/  el-Tawhid Juma Circle: Toronto Unity Mosque & learn that there is no singular, monolith Islam, and that for some, Islam is liberationary.

EFK and the rest of the leaders at el-Tawhid Juma Circle: Toronto Unity Mosque page make a point of emphasising the spiritual aspects of Islam and reducing focus on external elements. el-Tawhid Juma Circle: Toronto Unity Mosque group - wholly affirming and inclusive, with a focus on the spiritual and not so much the ritual.

Imam Daayiee Abdullah contact [the gay Imam in DC] (daayiee@aol.com). 

There’s also an Imam in Canada, TO who I know is pro-feminist, cool with gay Muslims and he asked me to give you his number if you would like it.

Some points

1) If you believe that God created you the way are, you can’t possible believe that God would reject you 2) The community you grew up in does not necessarily represent Islam 3) The beauty of Islam is that there is no intercession between you and God. You has every right and ability to pick up the Quran and find out what it means to you.  4) If you find things you can’t reconcile, you should speak to others who have found themselves in a similar situation. 5) 

thefatalfeminist.com

is a great starting point and introduction to feminism, Islam and social justice. 6) Islam does not prioritize men over women, the patriarchal actualization of Islam as seen through socially constructed norms prioritizes men over women, but that is a product of kyriarchy more than anything. If you want your faith to prioritize women, then do it.  7) Hit up Scott Kugle at Emory who could give you some nice readings and independent studies for Lesbianism or Queer identities and Islam. 

 From strawberreli [amazing Queer Muslim] !! http://strawberreli.tumblr.com/post/30642167690/queer-muslim-masterpost

queer muslim masterpost

This post pretty much came about because I was asked if I had resources for Muslims who were discovering or newly coming to terms with their sexuality. I didn’t, and the poor advice I had to offer was … poor. So, I pulled up a few of the blogs I followed that are targeted towards queer Muslims, and put together this little post for you!
Last updated: 06.14.16 (outdated info italicised)

Queer Muslim Blogs:

  • QueerMuslims
  • IamNotHaraam
  • Ace-Muslim
  • Trans Muslims
  • Ahwaa: An open space to debate LGBTQ-related issues in the Middle East
  • AllahMademeQueer
  • ComingOutMuslim
  • YouKnow-You'reaQueermuslim-When
  • InQueeries channel with Yusef Woof (contact inqueeriesshow@gmail.com)
  • Salaam Canada
  • TheBisexualBangladeshi
  • Muslims Against Homophobia and LGBT Hate facebook group
  • Queer Palestinian Empowerment Network (QPEN) facebook page
  • Queer Muslims of Boston facebook page
  • Totally Radical Muslim Zine

Queer Muslim 101:

  • A quick gender/sexuality 101 (An in-depth gender/sexuality/identity 201)
  • But what does a queer Muslim even look like? (hint: they look like people)
  • Defining homonationalism and pinkwashing. [A little bit more on pinkwashing.]
  • PDF:Homosexuality In Islam, by Scott Siraj al-Haqq Kugle (Intro + 1st Chap) Buy your own copy!
  • A good read-along-with the above book, Desiring Arabs by Joseph Massad and an online article here.
  • PDF:Muslim LGBT Inclusion Project, by Intersections International
  • More reading (a list w.some repeats): [x]
  • Why Safe Spaces are Important [looking for a replacement link]
  • “I’m confused about my sexuality.”
  • “I need proof from Qur'an and Sunnah that I’m not Haraam.”
  • “What about the Qur'an and Hadith that chastise LGBTQ Muslims?”
  • “You cherry pick your hadith!/You cherry pick from your religion!”
  • Some hadiths can be read in different ways, so it’s best to look at the outcome.
  • “Islam and LGBT are not mutually exclusive.”
  • “But I was taught Islam was the most heterosexist religion.“  [tw: continuously moving background at the link]
  • ”But all Muslims are homophobic!“ (spoiler alert: you’re wrong.)
  • ”But Muslims hate sex - it’s ~dirty~ to them!“ (I would recommend this class for basic 101 on marriage and love [sex] in Islam. Take it with Basyouni.) (See also: x and x)
  • ”Love the sinner, hate the sin, and why that’s bullshit.“
  • ”Should I come out?“ (spoiler alert: that’s up to you!)
  • ”Is there a place for LGBTQ Muslims?“ (Or ”There’s no place for LGBTQ Muslims/no organisations/no hope.“)
  • ”Will LGBTQ Muslims go to hell?“ (spoiler alert: I’m not God, how would I know?)
  • ”But it’s unnatural!“ (lolk)
  • ”There aren’t any gay Imams or Sheikhs, so you’re just making things up!“ (Also here.) (And here.)
  • “But scholars don’t condone it!”
  • ”But no fatwa was made!“ (It’s Wahabi.)
  • Egyptian fatwa
  • Indonesian fatwa [link broken, seeking replacement]
  • A post about other Sheikhs’ opinions.
  • ”But there are no inclusive mosques for LGBT Muslims!“ (Just stop. x)
  • There is no place for homophobia in Islam.
  • Let’s repeat that: There is no place for homophobia in Islam.
  • Ayahs that talk about Prophet Lut.
  • A closer reading of ayahs re: homosexuality (prev here).
  • See also: You decide how you interpret your religion.
  • Homosexuality in Sharia
  • Homosexuality in Predominately Muslim Countries (and some more on homosexuality inPakistan)
  • Pride Parade in Bangladesh (Please remember “hijra” is a slur depending on where in South Asia a person is from – please ask before using it as a catchall!)
  • Predominately Muslim Countries who are taking steps toward equality. [x] [x, x] [x] [x] [x]
  • Same-sex marriage
  • MASGD Statement on SCOTUS Marriage Equality Ruling
  • Queer Muslim Cinema: Azizah, Illuminations, Coming Out Muslim, A Jihad For Love, I Exist, Al-Nisa [BONUS: Show Al-Nisa and Red Summer (the producer) some love!], Circumstance, Naz + Maalik, Gay Muslims (a documentary produced by Channel 4 in the U.K), City of Borders, The Bubble, Out in the Dark (Palestinian and Israeli fall in love. facebook page), Facing Mirrors (2011; ft. an FtM Iranian), I Accept Me! (2011), Hir Poem, My Child. Sexualities and Queer Imaginaries. Oriented. [Article about Oriented, A Gay Girl in Damascus, and A Sinner in Mecca] [Muslim Drag Queens][Color of Water is trying to get funded]
  • Queer Muslim Music: Tum Hi Ho (by a drag artist in Lahore).
  • Queer Muslim Literature: [x] [x] [Four Gay Arabs Break the Silence] [Embracing Ramadhan in the LGBT Muslim Community] [Gaylaxy magazine] [Queer Beirut] [Sex and Desperate Hearts] [Bareed Mista3jil] [Totally Radical Muslims Zine] [5 Queer Magazines] [Not Your Tragic Queer Muslim Story/How to De-Queer Your Apartment] [Brown and Queer in America] [Queer South Asians and the Politics of Family] [A Thing of the West] [Coming Out in the Muslim Community] [Queer and Muslim At the Same Time] [9 articles on being LGBTQ in MENA] [Queering the Middle East] [Seeking Home: The Lives of Gay and Transgender Asylum Seekers of the Middle East] [Trans Muslim Honours His Faith] [Under the Gay Skin of Tehran] [Syrian and Iraqi Members of the LGBT Community Find Safe Haven in Istanbul] [Queer and Muslim] [On Community Spaces and Being A Trans Muslim] [‘Yousef and Farhad’ has been crafted by Algerian-American political cartoonist, Khalil Bendib, and Iranian-American author, Amir Soltani.] [Artist Mohammed Fayaz Draws Queer Muslims of Colour] [Xukia]
  • Desi LGBTQ Hotline
  • Queer Pakistan LGBTQ Voice and Support Group [and here is a news article]
  • Resources

A good thing to remember is to avoid the self-hatred phase, if you can. Focus on loving yourself, and realising that Allah made you just the way you are, and that you are loved, and that none of this is permanent. If this phase is unavoidable, here are some helpful sites:

  • Help! I’m losing my Islam
  • Counseling and Prevention Resources
  • Feeling suicidal?
  • Suicide prevention
  • Supporting someone who self-harms
  • Suicide and Crisis Hotlines
  • Online Crisis Network (for those with anxiety which prevents them from talking on the phone)
  • Online Chat (Arabic) for Queer Arabs

If you are a student and would like to get Faisal Alam to speak at your uni, or to see if he is coming to your uni soon, click here.

If you would like to attend Faisal Alam’s Retreat for Queer Muslims and their partners, here is more info.

If you would like to book Irshad Manji for an event click here.

If you are a PoC LGBTQ identified Muslim, QWOC is looking for submissions.

If you are from Indonesia, Pakistan, Bangladesh, or India and want to share your experiences (anonymously), please click here.

If you are South Asian and queer, consider submitting to Dayaar-e-Yaar! And if you are South Asian, queer, and between 18-25, consider attending this SoCal retreat (deadline for 2015 registration is Dec. 8th, 2014).

If you are a young activist, an independent researcher, a graduate student, or a fresh graduate, consider submitting a paper to the second issue of Kohl,  a journal for body and gender in the MENA region that wishes to explore the ways in which the erotic has been used as a means of economic and political exploitation in the MENA, within the region and outside it. Deadline to submit is Aug 2, 2015.

If you can spare some funds, help navigatethestream, a queer Muslim, become an Imam to help the Muslim LGBT community!

Lastly, here is a link if you are NOT a queer Muslim, but want to be a good ALLY! (And here is another on how NOT to be a saviour!) (And here is another on how to support a queer Muslim you happen to be dating!)

Muslim-Queer-Friendly Blogs:

(

If you’d like to be added to or taken off this list, please

send me an ask

.

)

  • occupidemuslim
  • hijabandboijeans
  • khalvatdaranjuman
  • navigatethestream
  • life-via-fo-eyes
  • living-in-technicolor
  • misandryad
  • mizjtoz
  • thalamtnafsee
  • alscientist
  • shootmethenleave
  • dyemelikeasunset
  • faineemae
  • seppin
  • gschwarzkopf
  • sllw
  • linzthenerd
  • vaginashavefeelingstoo
  • anartinsorcery
  • treatquestion
  • themadmanwithapen
  • ancientrune
  • sura93
  • insecurity-killed-the-cat
  • thehakawati
  • qalbesaleem
  • the-best-medicine
  • thesoundofthelifeofthemind
  • findingmotherland
  • shegufta
  • agileduck
  • zahhaked
  • megavelraptor
  • eibmorb
  • maesio
  • pyar-kiya-to-darna-kiya
  • postmodernveil
  • kuroenigma
  • safawi
  • casketofpearls
  • theyhelitsian
  • nofasciststate
  • chirikli
  • cokehabitsdiehard
  • decimaldot
  • madeast
  • lesbehalaaal
  • 4th-world
  • themindislimitless
  • brassmanticore
  • humjinsiyat
  • Freedom2Be
  • i-dare-to-dream
  • babyairnymph
  • twelvewhispersandbooks
  • whatamievensaying
  • whimslcott
  • haramdaddy
  • hiraethghost
  • larriefthalsey
  • t-pizzazz-a
  • young-flowerchild
  • zhangyixings
  • hairyjamespottery

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More papers/books not previously mentioned: 

BEYOND BINARY BARZAKHS: USING THE THEME OF LIMINALITY IN ISLAMIC THOUGHT TO QUESTION THE GENDER BINARY by Sara Haq Hussaini

The Quilt & Other Stories [translated from Urdu]

American Muslim Women, Religious Authority, and Activism: More Than a Prayer (Louann Atkins Temple Women & Culture Series)

Muslim Girl Article Did Homosexuality Exist Among Islamic Scholars? http://muslimgirl.com/25788/homosexuality-islam-academic-analysis/

FB Page: Muslims Against Homophobia and LGBT Hate

“Mukhannathun – and singular mukhannath – has been translated as “gay,” “queer,” even “third gender,” and none of these are wrong, per se. However, there’s a history behind the word that’s much richer. It all starts with hadith.“  

from” A Muslim RuPaul At The Dawn Of Islam: Tuwais and the Mukhannathun”: http://www.autostraddle.com/a-muslim-rupaul-at-the-dawn-of-islam-tuwais-and-the-mukhannathun-198612/

The Roots of Homophobia and Anti-Gay Sentiment in the Muslim World (by Ali Olomi)

Sublime Quran [a feminist translation] pdf by Laleh Bakhtiar

QURAN A Reformist Translation pdf Translated and Annotated by Edip Yuksel Layth Saleh al-Shaiban Martha Schulte-Nafeh 

Extensive, long but great read: Islamic Law, Homosexuality and the ‘Pulse’ Massacre by Shaykh Atabek

Aljazeera Article on Indonesia’s Trans Imams: http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2015/5/12/indonesias-transgender-priests-face-uncertain-future.html

Same-Sex Relationships & the Fluidity of Marriage in Islamic History (by Ali A. Olomi)