promised-ones

If You Gave Me A Promise

If you gave me a promise

I would keep it.

Not only I would keep it

but I would make sure it never gets out.

I’ll keep locked in my mind.

I would never break it.

I would never even talk about it.

I’m not crossing my fingers.

I’m not telling lies.

I’m telling the whole truth.


I promise.

8

When I was a boy, discovering my powers, I had no one. I had to figure out the Downworld all on my own. It was awful. So I vowed to myself that if I ever found someone in a similar situation, I’d try to make sure they didn’t have to go at it alone.

6

Can you believe I actually sat down and lined this personally I can’t

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On lists of “words to replace ‘said’”

stop. 

Replacing “said” is this trend apparently, either Snobby Writers or misled schoolteachers are telling you that using this word is bad. Using it improperly is bad, i.e.: 


“I’m going to work,” John said. 

“Okay,” Maria said. “See you later.” 

“Bye,” John said.

That is bad writing, But it’s bad writing for a number of reasons, and if you replace every instance of “said” with “hopped angrily”, it’s still bad writing. Using the word said, or any replacement thereof, is supposed to be done sparingly, i.e.: 

“I’m going to work,” John said, reaching for his coat.

Maria didn’t look at him. Instead, she kept her eyes focused on her bowl of cereal, shifting the spoon aimlessly. “Okay.” 

He sighed, shaking his head, shrugging the coat on and opening the door. He paused, turning his head over his shoulder. 

“Bye.” 

Silence. 

Relying on said, or any other verb, is bad writing when you’re relying on it to tell the story happening around it. But I argue that when you must use an descriptive verb like that, 75% of the time you should use ‘said’. Do you know why? 

When it isn’t every other word, you don’t even notice ‘said’. 

I find that most of the time, a ‘more creative’ synonym for that word jars the reader and breaks suspension of disbelief. Instead of thinking about what’s happening ,they’re thinking “oh, that’s different”. 

And while it might be novel for a second, I don’t care about being novel. I care about suspension of disbelief. 

So there, that’s why the endless river of tumblr posts decrying the use of the word said really irritate me, because high school English teachers and snotty English students have decided to tell the unwashed masses that using a perfectly useful tool in your writing arsenal is bad just because They Say So.