projective tests

2

Animation tests with different lighting.

 I am currently writing and developing the story for a short. I have every main beat figured out, and so far the story has way more heart than any previous film I’ve done. I’m doing all I can to make the story strong, and I can say it’s sort of a spiritual successor to the previous three films I’ve done (Crayon Dragon, Woflsong and Tiny Nomad) Here are some visual explorations

3

I did a couple of passes for this same shot. This one is a very short yet hard shot for me to do. 

My 1st pass is a very old take, and the early design of the character didn’t really have a focused direction - so it needed to be redone for sure. I realize he’s probably doing a bit too much for this scene; it being borderline over-acted.


The 2nd pass was definitely a lot more controlled, but I felt it lacked the intensity from the 1st pass. It was not dynamic enough, and the character felt like he wasn’t emotionally in the scene. It felt like he was just gliding to the poses, so it didn’t really have enough character to it. (Also, it’s evenly timed…)

The 3rd pass, I actually got advice and feedback from my friend Rune - who helped me figure out the poses. Draftsmanship and clear drawing are some of my wain weaknesses, so its always great to have someone else point out what causes the issues. Its pushed, yet more controlled and simplified. The gun leaving the screen as he swings adds a dynamism to the animation. It’s much snappier, for this being part of an action segment; it makes sense. I’ll have to come back and fix the drawing a bit so its a bit closer to the model of the 2nd, but I definitely learned a lot from re doing this shot a bunch. 

sammysamsammy  asked:

help me I'm desperate for a good klance fanfic. got anything recommended?

There’s always the fic rec list I have, unfortunately, I’ve been too busy to update it lately but it’s all quite good!

And a few fics I don’t think are on the list but are currently in my email updates from A03 are:

The Arch Project by @seliphra : Alien/Test Subject Keith and super top secret researcher Lance. I’m actually really loving this fic cause I’m a SUCKER for sci-fi so give this some love.

Of Lions and House Cats by @mstowa : "Keith is a superhero who’s been pining after the cute boy who works at the music shop across the street from HQ. He also doesn’t know that the cute boy is the same vigilante he wants to bring to justice.“

The Real Enemy by @writterwithin : “AU where Keith was raised by the Blade of Marmora and hasn’t yet met the other Paladins.”

BUZZFEED UNSOLVED AU
  • So basically,,, Lance is loosely based off Shane and Keith is loosely based off Ryan
    • Tbh Shiro and Lance being in Shane’s role is interchangeable, sometimes Shiro will do an ep and sometimes Lance will do an ep (it’s mostly Lance tho)
    • Shiro will usually fill in if Lance has like, a project or big test and can’t do an episode
    • [Shiro voice] hey there, demons, its me ya boy
  • Pidge handles the camera/techie stuff and Hunk helps out with editing and such
  • Keith and Pidge are Big Conspiracy Theorists and they start a YouTube channel called “Voltron Unsolved”
    • Lance: What the fucks a Voltron
    • Keith: do you want in or not?
    • Lance: of fucking course I do
  • At first it was mostly them just fucking around in a forest or allegedly haunted hotel trying to find demons and stuff but it got really popular after, like, a year
    • people loved the dynamic between Lance, Keith, Pidge, and Hunk and Shiro and Matt, when they joined in sometimes 
  • there’s 5 different Mothman episodes bc Keith is this close to catching him
  • Lance, in a panicked voice: something just grabbed my ass
  • One time they couldn’t find Shiro so theres just like 20 hours of footage of Pidge, Hunk, Keith, and Lance going around town looking for him and speculating on where he could be
    • Lance: thE COCO GOT HIM 
    • Keith: mothman is real and he abducted my brother behind a Denny’s
    • Pidge: what’s up gamers Shiro was fuckin possesed by a ghost
    • Hunk: oh my god Shiro died and we have to learn necromancy to resurrect him
      • turns out he was just hanging out with Matt lol
      • Matt: and I would’ve gotten away with it if it weren’t for you meddling kids!
      • Pidge: Matthew you are twenty eight, stop acting like a child
  • Keith: so apparently the spirits in this hotel are excessively violent and aggressive
  • Lance, from the shadows, lobbing a vase at Keith: YEET, BITCH
  • Pidge’s running gag in the show is that she says some variation of “I’m gonna call a fucking exorcist” whenever Lance fucks around in a haunted building or something
    • the funny thing is though she never actually does until they’re reviewing footage from when they visited the Lizzie Boren house and as Keith is talking to the picture of Lizze, they hear Keith’s name repeated many times in a voice not belonging to any of their’s
      • Pidge deadass calls an exorcist
  • Keith, turning around when a chair falls over: what was that?
  • Pidge: dunno. some bullshit
  • [Lance voice] Hey ghouls! The boys are here!
  • Hunk gets scared easily but he’s also really curious so tbh he’s probably the first to go poking around at some spooky shit
    • Pidge: what’s that red stain on the dresser huNK NO-
  • Lance: If you slit my throat tonight I’m gonna have a hard time forgiving you for that 
  • Keith, wheezing: okay are you going to haunt me in the afterlife then?
  • Lance: what? No ghosts aren’t real 
  • Pidge, zooming in on Lance’s distressed face: Local man very anxious, tune in at 11 for more
  • Shiro tries, really, really hard not to get any of them killed
    • not by like, the ghosts or demons or whatever. He lets Pidge, Lance, Hunk and Keith deal with that spooky stuff. He just doesn’t want the landlady of the haunted motel to murder Lance for banging on the walls and yelling “hey demons come out come out wherever the fuck you are!”
  • Lance: where the hell are we gonna get a Bigfoot costume in the middle of June?
  • Hunk: Target is having a five for one sale on brown rugs and I have a bunch of duct tape left over from band night?
  • Lance: Hunk you are a GENIUS
  • Keith loves investigating the paranormal and all but he gets freaked out when Lance starts fucking around with the demons or ghosts
    • Lance: ayyyy I’m getting a selfie with this ghost, this is going on the snap
    • Lance: there could be a ghost aggressively breakdancing behind you and you wouldn’t even know it
    • Lance: hey Keith the demons want you to blaze it lol
  • Lance likes to tease about Keith believing in ghosts but he will never let anyone know that something brushed up against his foot while it was hanging off the bed when he was lying down and now he keeps a bag of salt in his pocket at all times
    • Hunk: oh my god we don’t have any salt to make a salt circle we’re all going to die a painful and excruciating
    • Keith: Hunk calm down-
    • Lance, screaming and grabbing handfuls of salt from his pockets: NOT TODAY GHOSTS NOT T O D A Y
  • [while on the Queen Mary] Lance: Keith what if we’re in the same spot one of the scenes in titanic was filmed?! What if I’m standing where Kate Winslet stood?!
    • Lance: those lucky ghost bastards, getting to hang out when Titanic was being filmed here
    • Keith: … the people who died here did so in a horrific and unimaginable way
    • Lance: yeah but they probably got to stare at Leonardo DiCaprio when he was soaking wet so who’s the real winner here?
  • Pidge, zooming in on Keith and Lance sitting in the tub: two bros sittin in a hot tub… five feet apart cause they’re not gay
  • Pidge: ya aint shit ghost!
  • Lance, banging on the windows: ya aint SHIT
  • Pidge: ya just. like. ya FATHER.
Advice for Incoming College Freshman

When I first started college a year ago, I had a very little idea of the year to come.  I knew it would be nothing like the movies and if anything I was hoping to make some new friends.  In nearly a months thousands upon thousands of others like me will be taking their first step into college feeling the same as I did.  So I am here to give my five pieces of advice that will be good to know during your first week of school.

Let’s begin:

1. Don’t panic on move in day.

I was rare among my friends where instead of going to a college close to home, I went somewhere two hours away from my house.  It had always been a dream of mine to get out there and try and become someone new.  But when move in day came I was a mess.  I cried when I said goodbye to my cat, when we left my street, and when the signs came up that we were getting closer to the college.  But I learned that it’s okay to cry.  It’s okay to feel emotion when you leave a home you’ve been at most of your life.  But unlike me, I had many friends who did not cry on move in day.  It’s okay if you do or your don’t, neither makes you better than the other.

Nothing is going to go smoothly on move in day.  Someone will get lost or something may break.  You may unpack your things in the wrong room.  You may realize you left something vitally important at home that you can’t go a day without.  It’s okay.  Forgetting something is normal.  I know my mother was mailing little things I had forgotten at home the day after I left.  Just because you don’t have those things now doesn’t mean the world is going to end.  Your college dream will not be crushed.

Basically my advice is: take deep breaths throughout the day.  Someone is going to drive you crazy or make you upset.  Don’t let that get to you.  This is the beginning to something awesome.

2. Don’t be afraid to eat alone.

At the college I attend, I knew no one there.  A few kids from my high school went but I didn’t know them well enough to become friends with them.  I was put into a suite which meant that I lived with seven other girls(not as terrifying as you would think.)  So when dinner time came around I found myself lost.  My roommate had gone off with some girls she had met and I knew no one else in my suite.  So I went by myself to the dining hall and ate alone.  Of course I was texting and snapchating my friends so I wasn’t completely alone.  But as I looked around the hall, I realized there were a lot of other kids there too, eating alone and looking nervous. 

Eating alone turned out to be a good thing because as I left, a girl in my building stopped me on the way out.  She remembered me from the hall meeting and worked for Housing.  She said “I saw you eating alone and I was wondering if you wanted to come with me and a few of my friends to go see a movie on the lawn.”  I was surprised she asked me but I gladly excepted.  I didn’t really talk to that girl again but it was a nice start to a great semester.

Advice: Do what’s comfortable for you.  I decided to eat alone because I wanted to face my fears.  I knew people who stayed in their rooms all night because that was comfortable for them.  Whatever works for you do it.

3. There is a 50% chance you will become friends with your roommate

This is always a complicated because there are so many people who have so many different situations.  My roommate and I were good friends during the first semester but by the time the second semester ended we barely spoke.  A lot of our problems were miscommunication and both of us were too stubborn to try and fix things after a long semester of fighting.

This may not be your situation.  I know many people who have kept in touch with their old roommates and are still good friends.  I also know people who can barely speak their name without wanting to throw up.  Don’t let this get you down.  Everyone is different in their way of communicating and discovering who they are.

Advice: Keep communication open.  If you aren’t comfortable with what your roommate is doing, say something.  Bring a mutual friend that can help if that makes you more comfortable.  But also vice versa.  If your roommate comes to you with a problem she/he has, listen and try to compromise.  Communication is key.

4. Leave your room

It is very tempting to hide in your room all weekend and watch videos on Netflix or Youtube.  But hiding in your room is something your shouldn’t do.  Try to look up events that are happening on campus.  If you’re an Introvert like me, the thought of socializing makes you tense.  But try and build the courage to go to at least one event.  This will make you so much more comfortable with the people around you and get you use to the flow of the college.

Many clubs try their advertising during the first week of school.  Get yourself out there and try to find something that suits your eye.  Most colleges have a huge variety when it comes to the clubs and organizations they have.  Maybe you’ll find the one that suits you best.

Advice: Leave your room.  You won’t regret it.

5. The first year is the hardest

My first year of college was a lot of ups and downs.  I like to focus on the ups but also remembering how I got to the downs.  No one’s first year is going to be perfect.  There are so many tests, projects, and speeches that seem so far in the future but come so fast.  If you can, try to make at least one friend in every class.  That way you have someone that can give you advice or even help you along the way.

I was lucky enough that my close friend at college now had the exact same schedule as me during our first semester.  We have become so close since and I don’t regret the day we started talking. 

Finally I would like to say that college isn’t for everyone.  It’s okay if after your first semester you say “This isn’t right for me.” or even after your first year.  The first year is a trial period to figure out who you are and who you want to become.  I hope this helps anyone out there who may be stressing over college right now.

Till we meet again :)

The Road To Good Grades

[Warning - A Very Lengthy Post]

A fellow student of mine wrote this when for my batch when we entered high school, and I thought I should share it with you ❤️ it’s been edited to make it more universal to you guys :D

Intro: Having the Courage to Study.
When we fail academically, we tend to point to two causes: stupidity and laziness. It’s so easy to say that we’re not smart enough, or that we just don’t want to try because it doesn’t really matter. But there’s another factor involved: fear. So many students have the strategy of not studying or not studying properly for an exam. Why? Because if you put low effort into something, then you should expect a low result. So many of us are afraid of trying and failing that we don’t even try. “What if my best isn’t good enough?” We’re afraid of giving our best because once we know our limits, we feel that much weaker. But life in school isn’t about not trying, it’s about accepting those limits and breaking them.To survive and ultimately thrive, you must have the courage to reach your full potential.That courage, that vigor, that strive to be better is what will keep you alive, not just in school but in the real world.

Guide:
- Sleep and Eat well.
We often lose sleep or skip meals in order to survive the rigors of life.But keep in mind, those choices in the rest and nourishment you receive have consequences. Having the energy to focus throughout the day is vital. Nobody wants to be tired, nobody can afford to be sick.

- Pay Attention in Class.
There’s a difference between passive hearing and active listening. Letting the teacher’s words wash over you like a warm shower is NOT the same as paying attention. Teachers are human beings, capable of expressing emotion and emphasis in their words and actions. There’s a reason why you learn from them rather than from a book or the internet. Catching what they’re trying to say is a skill that takes effort to learn.

**The skill of listening is one of the most important ones to develop because a teacher’s words are your last resort in an examination. If a quiz catches you by surprise, your memory of the class is the difference between A+ and an F.

- Take USABLE Notes.
Normally, humans are not capable of memorizing lessons entirely in their head.That’s what notes are for. Keep in mind that notes should be USABLE, they are not things that you make for the sake of looking or feeling productive. Each person has a specific style of learning and their notes should reflect that. Notes that are too long/elaborate, too short/simple, unreadable, or illogical are detrimental. Good notes should be aids in studying, not justification for carrying notebooks.

**Tips:
- Save time by using abbreviations or acronyms.
- Rearrange/reconstruct words or phrases for convenience.
ex. Famous Authors of America –> Impt. American Authors.
- Avoid copying verbatim unless necessary (quotes).
- Write down examples, esp. in science/math related subjects.
- If notes are incomplete, supplement them via reliable sources or your teacher.

- Practice.
There is more to studying than reading/note-taking. Practice is essential. This is especially true for Math-related subjects. Reading your notes before a Math exam is not really going to help you understand the problem or protect you from careless mistakes. The only way to improve in the subject is by doing the exercises and learning from both your success and failure. Memorizing definitions isn’t as important as using them. Being able to analyze, compare, and contrast is vital to survival.

- Review a Little Bit, Regularly.
Slow and steady wins the race. Students tend to read a ton of material before an exam. However, the human mind requires time in order to fully grasp ideas and concepts. Taking 10-20 minutes to read your notes after school daily can help in memorizing lessons, understanding themes, and recalling important points. Taking every subject’s lessons day by day will prevent you from being overwhelmed.

**Tip:
- When reading through your notes, picture yourself in the classroom with your classmates and teacher. The human mind is like a web, connected by images and sounds. Doing so can help you recall things written on the board or things mentioned by the teacher.

- Learn to Plan and Cram.
Working for the long-term and rushing for the short-term are two opposing ends of the spectrum. But if you don’t master both, you will suffocate in requirements.Time and energy are limited resources and the best scholars know how to get the most out of them. You can’t expect to be able to plan assignments weeks or days in advance the same way you can’t expect to make “academic excellence” in 30 minutes or less like a pizza delivery service.

**Tips:
- Periodic Exams, Long Tests, and Projects REQUIRE planning and coordination.
- Teachers can take up to 5 minutes setting up. Exploit the time.
- Lunchbreak, and the 20 minute breaks are the normal “"cram periods”“.


- Don’t Think of Difficulty.
“Easy” and “Hard” are relative terms. They mean different things to different people and ultimately, they should mean nothing to you. Feeling scared of a “tough” exam is harmful, as is feeling smug about an “easy” one. Study well so you can approach every test with confidence. Remember: it’s just as possible to perfect a difficult test as it is to fail an easy one.

- Don’t Compare Yourself to Others.
The world has approx. 7 billion people. There are always going to be people who are better than you at a given skill, the same way that there will always be people who are worse. Don’t consider them. Your life is your battle, and you’re going to have to fight it for yourself. Being discouraged by your friends’ high scores is as illogical as being encouraged by their low scores. There’s no reason to be proud of 1/10, even if it’s the highest score in the whole class.

- Don’t Blame Teachers.
Not all of your teachers are going to be fair or good at their jobs, whether you like it or not. Regardless, you can’t control your teacher’s incompetence or harshness but you can control the effort you put into their class. Read in advance, find other of info sources, and predict their requirements. The odds may be against you, but as a student you’re expected to beat them.

- Consult.
There’s no shame in asking for help. If you have difficulty in a subject, it always helps to consult with a teacher. Not only does it help in resolving any misconceptions/mistakes, it shows that you’re willing to take the time and effort to do well. To most teachers, that spirit is just as important as the final grade. Note: if a teacher knows that you have difficulty in their subject, they’ll probably take note of it in class which may be to your benefit.

- Find Your Own Strategy/Work Smart.
No single study strategy works universally. Everyone has their own specific style of learning and it’s up to you to find yours. If skimming through readings works for you then go ahead. If you’re the kind that needs to take notes, fine. It’s all about working both hard and smart, giving the most energy but finding the most effective way of using it. Humans are creative creatures. You might find that the best solution is one that no one has thought of before.

- Be Liable.
You need to be proactive in academics. Many students have the tendency to be caught off guard by a surprise quiz. They’ll often argue with the teacher, using the retort “Ma'am, you didn’t announce it!” as an excuse. Shaking off responsibility through ignorance is suicidal in this school. If you’re willing to take the risk of coming to class unprepared for the sake of being lazy, go ahead. Just be prepared for the consequences of your actions.

- Keep Moving Forward.
You’re human. Humans make mistakes. Learn from your errors but leave them where they belong; in the past. Everyone wants to get an A+ but you’ll never go that far with the weight of your failure hanging over your shoulder.

Conclusion: Don’t Take Academics too Seriously.
It seems counter-intuitive to end this guide with a statement like “Don’t Take Academics Too Seriously” but it’s something that everyone should remember. No matter no hard you try, you will fail at something. You’ll reach an obstacle that will knock you down to the ground and it will hurt like hell. You need to have something to fall back; friends, family, a hobby, an interest, etc. You don’t want to graduate and realize that you’re only good at earning numbers in a system.You could graduate this high school with the highest average in history but it won’t matter to anyone if you don’t know how you got it. Life is just like math, it’s not all
about the final answer. Your solution is just as important.

**Ultimately, your success as a scholar isn’t measured by a number on a piece of paper but in the difference you make in people’s lives. We’re not going to carry facts and theorems with us, but an attitude of trying to give our best no matter what the cost. That’s the most important lesson you can ever learn in school, but you’re not going to learn it from one subject or teacher. You’re going to live it everyday through every requirement and every grade receive.

Hi everybody! I’ve gotten a couple of requests for this post, so I thought I’d finally put together my process for making a weekly spread!

Disclaimer: This is simply a system I find to be simple and doable for everyday life. By no means is this the only way or the best way to bullet journal! It’s just a way that I find to be realistic and aesthetically pleasing. 

Before we start: most of my layout is based on @studypunked’s and the moodboard I used was made for me by @sapphiccstudies! 

Supplies I used: Hardcover black Moleskine (grid paper); Green Mildliner; Pilot Hi-Tec-C 05 gel pen; Pony Brown stickers; Clear tape

Step 1: Decide on a color scheme! I always choose a monthly theme (for example, January’s was outer space and March’s was plants). Then, for each week I choose a subtheme! (ex. the first week of January was moon phases.) Then, I choose a Mildliner color that matches the theme. This week, I used a pink moodboard with green accents, so I used a green mildliner! 

Step 2: Weekly planning

I list the week number at the top of the page, and underneath that I put the dates within the week. (This has no purpose other than making me feel organized.) Then, below that I like to make a little monthly calendar (because it’s surprisingly often that I need to know what day of the week a certain date is!) Finally, below that I have a weekly schedule. This is where I write the dates of any tests, quizzes, projects, holidays, birthdays, etc! Generally, these are transferred from my monthly event calendar.

Step 3: Weekly tasks

This step makes my job pretty easy throughout the week! It’s as simple as listing the date and then making check boxes next to any tasks for the week. (This way, I don’t have to worry about much on days when I’m busy.)

Step 4: Finding images

Finally, the weekend rolls around and I’m ready to get into the fun stuff! Usually, here’s where I scour Google Images (I like to use the keywords ‘tumblr’ and ‘aesthetic’ along with my chosen color and theme) for pictures, but this week was easy for me thanks to a moodboard :)

Step 5: Drawings

After choosing my images (usually three, but it’s summer and I don’t have many tasks so I used six) I draw some stuff that goes with the theme in anywhere there will be empty space. Sometimes I also look for quotes and get a little prwctice with typography!

Step 6: Arrange and paste images


I play around with the layout of the images until I find the arrangement I like best, then use little loops of scotch tape to paste them down (usually straight but sometimes crooked if I’m feeling artsy)

Bonus Step: Add Stickers!

I only sometimes do this, but the gist of this is “put them wherever you want, but not too many because stickers are expensive.”

And Voilà! Here’s the finished product:

extracurriculars can take up so much time and it can be hard to find time to start and finish assignments, projects, and study for tests and exams. here are some tips to help you pull through it!

get some sleep

go to sleep early or take a nap. do whatever you need. without sleep, you’ll only feel more miserable and tired and irritable. you’re more likely to do poorly during practices and classes. don’t force yourself to pull an all-nighter. instead, go to sleep early and wake up early to finish up the last bits of work left to do.

write it down

if you get an assignment or find out a deadline, write it down. don’t tell yourself that you’ll remember it because you won’t.

schedule your time

a planner or a bullet journal or a calendar app are the most common ways that people keep track of the things that they need to do. jot down the events that you need to be at + the starting and ending times. schedule study time like an event too. school is important too!!

find spare time and use it

use spare time during lunch period to get that last question done on a math assignment. use the downtimes at meets to start the first paragraph of that essay you need to turn in. finish up language homework during transportation time. use worktime in class to get a head start on things. you actually have a lot of time if you add up all the spare bits.

do what works for you

use study methods that fit you. you don’t have to force yourself to write notes if you find that it doesn’t help you. if reviewing flashcards helps you more than writing mind maps, then do that instead. don’t get caught up with thoughts of what you “have” to do based on the overwhelming aesthetics and popular methods commonly displayed in the studyblr community.

get an early start on things

start homework as soon as you get it. begin projects on the first day and not before the deadline. since you’ll be busy most of the time, it’s better to get a head start on things and have a few extra days and bits of time to spare for those emergency club meetings and matches that drain your time.

stay healthy

your body needs to be in top condition in order to do all of those sports and keep up with those clubs and stay on track in school! drink plenty of water, eat balanced meals, and have healthy snacks and breaks when you need them.

weekends are your best friend

even if you have games and matches and events during weekends, you can still wake up early and find time in the morning. you can also find time in the evenings too! you have a lot more time on weekends. remember to use some of that time to also relax and wind down too!
don’t make up flimsy excuses if you know that they’re not true. you can’t help it if you’re tired, but don’t pretend like you’re tired and push off those essays until another day.

talk with your teachers

if it gets really bad, try to talk with your teachers, advisors, and coaches to see if you can work something out. school is still important and balance is key. i’m sure that you can work something out.

drop something if you have to

in the end, your own physical and mental health is what matters the most. please take a day off if you have to, and if you can’t handle it anymore, then you need to acknowledge that and drop something (not school).

you can pull through it!!! it might seem overwhelming, but you can get used to it. however, remember that you are only human. don’t disregard your own health and education. don’t stress yourself out too much! if it is too much for you, talk to a teacher or advisor immediately.

hope this helped and good luck! if you’d like to request a post, go here and if you’d like to see more helpful posts, go here!! thanks :)

10 People You Wish You Met from 100 Years of NASA’s Langley

Something happened 100 years ago that changed forever the way we fly. And then the way we explore space. And then how we study our home planet. That something was the establishment of what is now NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. Founded just three months after America’s entry into World War I, Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory was established as the nation’s first civilian facility focused on aeronautical research. The goal was, simply, to “solve the fundamental problems of flight.”

From the beginning, Langley engineers devised technologies for safer, higher, farther and faster air travel. Top-tier talent was hired. State-of-the-art wind tunnels and supporting infrastructure was built. Unique solutions were found.

Langley researchers developed the wing shapes still used today in airplane design. Better propellers, engine cowlings, all-metal airplanes, new kinds of rotorcraft and helicopters, faster-than-sound flight - these were among Langley’s many groundbreaking aeronautical advances spanning its first decades.

By 1958, Langley’s governing organization, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, or NACA, would become NASA, and Langley’s accomplishments would soar from air into space.

Here are 10 people you wish you met from the storied history of Langley:

Robert R. “Bob” Gilruth (1913–2000) 

  • Considered the father of the U.S. manned space program.
  • He helped organize the Manned Spacecraft Center – now the Johnson Space Center – in Houston, Texas. 
  • Gilruth managed 25 crewed spaceflights, including Alan Shepard’s first Mercury flight in May 1961, the first lunar landing by Apollo 11 in July 1969, the dramatic rescue of Apollo 13 in 1970, and the Apollo 15 mission in July 1971.

Christopher C. “Chris” Kraft, Jr. (1924-) 

  • Created the concept and developed the organization, operational procedures and culture of NASA’s Mission Control.
  • Played a vital role in the success of the final Apollo missions, the first manned space station (Skylab), the first international space docking (Apollo-Soyuz Test Project), and the first space shuttle flights.

Maxime “Max” A. Faget (1921–2004) 

  • Devised many of the design concepts incorporated into all U.S.  manned spacecraft.
  • The author of papers and books that laid the engineering foundations for methods, procedures and approaches to spaceflight. 
  • An expert in safe atmospheric reentry, he developed the capsule design and operational plan for Project Mercury, and made major contributions to the Apollo Program’s basic command module configuration.

Caldwell Johnson (1919–2013) 

  • Worked for decades with Max Faget helping to design the earliest experimental spacecraft, addressing issues such as bodily restraint and mobility, personal hygiene, weight limits, and food and water supply. 
  • A key member of NASA’s spacecraft design team, Johnson established the basic layout and physical contours of America’s space capsules.

William H. “Hewitt” Phillips (1918–2009) 

  • Provided solutions to critical issues and problems associated with control of aircraft and spacecraft. 
  • Under his leadership, NASA Langley developed piloted astronaut simulators, ensuring the success of the Gemini and Apollo missions. Phillips personally conceived and successfully advocated for the 240-foot-high Langley Lunar Landing Facility used for moon-landing training, and later contributed to space shuttle development, Orion spacecraft splashdown capabilities and commercial crew programs.

Katherine Johnson (1918-) 

  • Was one of NASA Langley’s most notable “human computers,” calculating the trajectory analysis for Alan Shepard’s May 1961 mission, Freedom 7, America’s first human spaceflight. 
  • She verified the orbital equations controlling the capsule trajectory of John Glenn’s Friendship 7 mission from blastoff to splashdown, calculations that would help to sync Project Apollo’s lunar lander with the moon-orbiting command and service module. 
  • Johnson also worked on the space shuttle and the Earth Resources Satellite, and authored or coauthored 26 research reports.

Dorothy Vaughan (1910–2008) 

  • Was both a respected mathematician and NASA’s first African-American manager, head of NASA Langley’s segregated West Area Computing Unit from 1949 until 1958. 
  • Once segregated facilities were abolished, she joined a racially and gender-integrated group on the frontier of electronic computing. 
  • Vaughan became an expert FORTRAN programmer, and contributed to the Scout Launch Vehicle Program.

William E. Stoney Jr. (1925-) 

  • Oversaw the development of early rockets, and was manager of a NASA Langley-based project that created the Scout solid-propellant rocket. 
  • One of the most successful boosters in NASA history, Scout and its payloads led to critical advancements in atmospheric and space science. 
  • Stoney became chief of advanced space vehicle concepts at NASA headquarters in Washington, headed the advanced spacecraft technology division at the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, and was engineering director of the Apollo Program Office.

Israel Taback (1920–2008) 

  • Was chief engineer for NASA’s Lunar Orbiter program. Five Lunar Orbiters circled the moon, three taking photographs of potential Apollo landing sites and two mapping 99 percent of the lunar surface. 
  • Taback later became deputy project manager for the Mars Viking project. Seven years to the day of the first moon landing, on July 20, 1976, Viking 1 became NASA’s first Martian lander, touching down without incident in western Chryse Planitia in the planet’s northern equatorial region.

John C Houbolt (1919–2014) 

  • Forcefully advocated for the lunar-orbit-rendezvous concept that proved the vital link in the nation’s successful Apollo moon landing. 
  • In 1963, after the lunar-orbit-rendezvous technique was adopted, Houbolt left NASA for the private sector as an aeronautics, astronautics and advanced-technology consultant. 
  • He returned to Langley in 1976 to become its chief aeronautical scientist. During a decades-long career, Houbolt was the author of more than 120 technical publications.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

ultimate back to school masterpost

it has come…the witching hour…the time of doom is now upon us…okay so obviously ignore me, i’m a huge nerd. but if you’re like me, going back to school is a terrible, nerve-wracking experience. so here are some tips to help you survive this.

1. Do. Your. Summer. Work. If you haven’t started on it now, turn off whatever device you’re reading this on and start working. Many teachers will test you on whatever summer work you were assigned, and occasionally it can count for a significant portion of your first semester grade. Seriously, don’t put it off until the last minute, because then you really won’t want to do it. Plus, then you’ll have more time to focus on binge-watching Netflix uninterrupted. 

2. Whether you’re moving to an entirely new school or just a new grade, things will change this year in some way. You have to be ready for it. And you-yes, you-can be one of those things. It’s never too late to reinvent yourself. Want to dye your hair? Try a new extracurricular? Break a bad habit? Learn a new language? Go for it. 

3. Push yourself, but not at the expense of your mental health. No test or project is worth breaking down over. That being said, procrastination is the enemy of progress. You won’t do it later-and if you do, you won’t do it as well as you could have. 

4. Make time for your friends and yourself. Don’t let school take over your life. Self care and having fun are important too. 

5. Wherever you are, whenever you are, people are going to judge you. It’s how we’re wired-we’re a judgmental species. There’s really no point in worrying about how other people perceive you because you can’t please everyone. You could be an actual saint canonized by the pope AND cure cancer AND negotiate an armistice between the forces of good and the rabid radioactive alien wolves sworn to destroy all humanity and still some people are going to call you “bitchy,” “fake,” “weird,” “trying too hard,” et cetera, et cetera. Be unabashedly you. 

6. You are smart. Really really smart. So what if you don’t have perfect grades or the best ACT score? If you’re trying your best-really, really your best-no one can fault you for it. 

7. People who are confident in the knowledge of their own intelligence don’t: 

  • play the “grade game” i.e. “whadja get??? i’m sure you did great…seriously whadja get tho?? c’mon show me, i won’t tell anyone.” (u know these kids) 
  • loudly complain about getting an A minus/B plus when they know other people didn’t do as well as them
  • say they “didn’t study” every time there’s a test
  • cheat
  • lecture people when they didn’t ask for it
  • brag about their grades/scholarships/other opportunities 
  • compare themselves to/compete with other students constantly
  • condescend to others
  • talk about how much “busier” they are than other students all the time
  • put others down whenever they talk about successes (”i’ve won loads of those; it’s not that hard to do.” “you do know everyone who applied for science olympiad got in, right?”) *the last one someone actually said to me-and it was a blatant lie so double wtf?? 
  • lie about accomplishments when asked (just say you don’t want to talk about it its? not? that? hard?)
  • make fun of people who don’t do as well as you

Bottom line: Be honest with yourself-do you do any of these things? If so, why? The truth is, if you view your academic life as this crazy competition, you’re not going to have any fun, you’re going to lose friends over it, and people aren’t going to see you as a role model to emulate, they’re going to think you’re well…an arrogant, self-centered tool. Everyone loves that you care about school, and everyone can see that you’re really smart and driven. You have nothing to prove, and everything to lose. If you want to do well for yourself, that’s great. But if it’s all about one-upping other people, it’s not worth it. Like in writing, show, don’t tell, how competitive of a student you are. 

8. Good friends don’t: 

  • put you down
  • exclude you
  • stifle you 
  • use you as an emotional dumping ground 
  • stop supporting you 
  • tell people your secrets
  • gaslight you 
  • manipulate you 
  • make you feel unsafe
  • abuse you in any capacity
  • threaten to rescind their friendship for small offenses
  • make jokes that you find offensive 
  • ignore you/give you the silent treatment without telling you what’s wrong
  • pressure you into doing things you don’t want to
  • only hang out with you when their “best friends” aren’t around
  • talk about themselves all the time but never ask you about yourself
  • mooch off you 
  • stop talking to you for no reason
  • refuse to stick up for you when people are being jerks

Bottom line-if you feel like you come in second, if you feel like you’re the one that has to do all the work in the friendship, you have to ask yourself why you’re trying so hard. Having healthy friendships is as important as having healthy romantic relationships. Of course, there are degrees to how toxic friendships can be. I’ve been in some fairly awful ones that I had to cut off completely, but I’ve managed to reconnect with other people who I didn’t have good friendships with (i’m always careful never to get too close to those people though.) If you’re being abused or manipulated by a friend, you need to CUT THAT PERSON OFF. You deserve friends who treat you with respect. If your friends don’t, you’re better off alone (at least until you’ve found some real friends.) 

9. No significant other or crush is more important than your grades, your extracurriculars, or your mental health. If your relationship is taking over your life, take a step back and ask, “Where do I see this going?” Don’t waste time with people who don’t treat you right or people who aren’t interested. When the right person comes along (and they will!), you won’t have to feel nervous or awkward around them. 

10. Study smarter, not harder. Use abbreviations in your notes and find shortcuts to difficult math problems. Of course, do all your homework. It’ll cost you big time in the long run. 

11. Buy some clothes that you actually want to wear, and get rid of the ones that you hate. It’ll make getting up in the morning that much better if you feel confident about how you look. Dress for yourself-you are not “slutty” or “trying too hard” for wanting to look good. 

12. Find your textbooks online so you don’t have to lug them back and forth every day. Don’t wait to buy your supplies-buy them now so you can get good deals and won’t end up scouring every office supply store for that particular brand of pencil. 

13. Participate. Seriously. I didn’t realize what a difference this made until I got to high school. Even if you feel like you’re going to get the question wrong, even if you feel like you’re not smart enough to add anything interesting to the class discussion, say something. Not only does it make the teacher notice you-which in a big class is super important-it’ll show that you’re paying attention and that you want to learn. If you participate, teachers will be more likely to remember you and you’ll feel more confident about yourself, as well as less tempted to doze off or talk to your friends. Do this in all your classes-even the ones you’re not as good at-and you will see better grades-guaranteed (especially if they grade on participation). 

14. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. You’re not stupid if you don’t understand something. If you can, ask someone to tutor you if you’re struggling. Ask the teacher for extra practice on what you struggle with. If no one is asking your question for you in class, you have to ask it yourself, otherwise you’re never going to learn. 

15. Hard test? Start studying 3-4 days in advance. One day review notes and material; the others do practice exercises or quiz yourself. If possible, study with friends-as long as they don’t distract you. Take 5-10 minute breaks in between sessions so you don’t burn out. 

16. Make a studying playlist and a motivational playlist. You’ll be amazed at how much better you feel about studying. Only do extracurriculars you actually enjoy-not ones you just do because you think it will look good on some application or the other. Don’t load up on these activities either or your grades will start to dip. 

17. Know the dates and times of any big standardized tests you’re taking (SAT, ACT, PSAT, AP tests, IB tests, IGSE, GCSE, SAT Subject Tests, etc.). Plan to start reviewing for these at least a month before the exam. (and a month before only if you know you’re really good at that kind of test-taking.)  

18. Edit your essays, once by yourself and once with a friend. Know the format your teacher wants so you don’t have to waste time googling “MLA in-text citation” every time you have an essay due. 

19. This may come as a surprise to you, but you are not the center of the universe. So before you go on long rants about how hard your life is, remember, you have no idea what the person you’re sitting next to might be going through. You are not the only person ever who’s had to juggle hard classes, extracurriculars, a job, and family problems at the same time. Other people are also struggling-what you’re going through is not more difficult or more meaningful than what anyone else is dealing with. This year, make a resolution to ask people questions about themselves, to listen to others, instead of making everything about you. You will be surprised at how much more people will trust you and how many more friends you will make. Also, guess what? Bad days happen to everyone-so stop taking out your frustrations on people that you care about. It’s petty, it’s stupid, it’s not fair, and it’s the quickest way to make your bad day a little worse. 

20. Regardless of whatever happens this year, you will graduate, you will get a job that makes you happy, and you will be a wonderful, intelligent, beautiful, successful human being. If you get nothing else out of this post, take this-don’t get yourself so taken in by that weird, hive-mind-toxic culture that school perpetuates that you lose the ability to deal with the people who are truly important to you. At the end of the day, you want to say that you came out of this school year a happier, wiser person than you entered it.