prohibitionist

I feel like I’m a lot like Luke; loyal, fond of his little world, a man who doesn’t like change and who loves the people he chooses to love. You can trust him. I grew up with a very similar background in Haddonfield, New Jersey, 15 thousand people, some of which were really bizarre. It was a historical town, George Washington had slept there once, during the prohibitionist era you couldn’t find any liquor there and could only paint buildings in 5 different colors - and had to ask the city council for permission first- very much like Stars Hollow.

It took me all of two seconds to say yes to Netflix, maybe one and a half, none of us were satisfied with how it ended, too many unanswered questions.

—  Scott Patterson - Vanity Fair Italia [x] 

Like, okay, take it micro.

You have this poor person. They’re hungry and they can afford like mcdonalds sometimes or sometimes just Doritos or chips from the vending machine.

And prohibitionists are like “that’s fucked! We’re against capitalism AND you having to live like this! We’ll save you!” and they take away the mcdonalds. “Now you can’t poison yourself!” they say, but they haven’t given the person more money for better food, or cheaper good food, or any options, so now the person is stuck with the even worse crap from the vending machine.

But vending machines are also illegal! DIDN’T SEE THAT COMING DID YOU?


that’s what it’s like.

I can’t sleep because I’m so angry even though I have to wake up at seven for work and be calm and level headed and supportive for other angry people in crisis.

There’s a war on poverty happening in this country and this world, not a war to eradicate poverty but a war to eradicate the poor and regardless of their “wah wah I’m against capitalism AND sex work!” twaddle feminists are FIRMLY on the side of those eradicating the poor.

I mean I highly doubt these tumblrites actually do real life advocacy work for anyone, let alone sex workers, but for the prohibitionists who DO spend real world time trying to “help” sex workers, you don’t see them throwing themselves into advocating for ANYTHING that would actually help the most vulnerable and at risk sex workers, the ones they say they’re so concerned about.

They aren’t advocating for inclusionary income zoning.
They aren’t writing letters or harassing the government to spend more funding on shelters and day centers.
They aren’t out there when sex workers lose everything after being outed, helping them create an alternate to returning to sex work.
They aren’t funding or begging for funding for ACTUAL exit programs–Canada’s is now notorious but it’s far from the only embarrassingly and tellingly inadequate “exit fund.”
They aren’t supporting sex workers who ARE working for change and against sexual assault and harassment.
They aren’t supporting legislative efforts to get sex workers more protections.
They aren’t writing to damn’d further protections from cops, even tho it’s beyond clear that cops are the scariest force in the states today.
And, hello, they aren’t out in the streets helping sex workers stay safe, no strings attached.

Prohibitionist feminists are one trick ponies and their one trick is to end us. It has nothing to do with ending capitalism or helping poor women, and everything to do with keeping poor women down and unable to access safety.

4

The Skeleton Army vs. the Salvation Army,

Today the Salvation Army are known as a charitable religious organization dedicated to helping the poor and providing disaster relief.  They operate numerous non-profit second hand stores, shelters, drug rehab facilities, and especially make themselves known with their red buckets and bells during Christmas time.

While today there is little controversy over the Salvation Army and their operations, in the late 19th century, they were met with both praise and very harsh scorn. Founded in 1865 in England, the Salvation Army was not only a charitable religious organization, but a very militant progressive reform organization that sought to reform society at its most fundamental levels.  They were a very puritanical organization which actively sought to restrict things such as gambling, dancing, prostitution, theaters, secular music, and various others things that people considered fun.  What especially earned the Salvation Army’s scorn from the common people was that they were prohibitionists; they actively sought the complete and total illegalization of alcohol.  When the Salvation Army marched into town, they did so not only to help the poor and convert people to Jesus, but to close down all the saloons, theaters, dancing halls, gambling dens, and bordellos.

While the Salvation Army was dedicated to helping the lower class out of poverty, they often found the staunchest opposition from those they sought to help.  In Southern England in the 1880’s, many different towns and cities formed what were called “Skeleton Armies” to combat the Salvation Army.  Formed mostly from lower class and middle class peoples, they were called Skeleton Armies because they commonly carried skull and crossbone flags and banners while wearing similar skeleton themed regalia. When the Salvation Army paraded in the streets, the Skeleton Army too would follow, often laughing, jeering, and insulting their opposites. They would also pelt Salvationists with eggs, rotten vegetables, and animal dung.  Sometimes confrontations between the Salvationists and Skeletons led to violence and brawling in the streets.  In some instances Salvation Army headquarters and barracks were subjected to vandalism and acts of arson. 

The rivalry between the Skeletons and Salvationists peaked in 1889, with scores of demonstrations and riots occurring across England.  Despite various insults and acts of violence, the Salvation Army refused to back down.  In the 1890’s the Skeleton Army movement began to pitter out.  Most Skelton Armies had disbanded by 1893.

Not the biggest fan of Alan Moore or V For Vendetta, esp the movie, but I think the point about integrity is one of the most important points ever, especially as a sex worker.

As women we’re constantly told that our integrity is tied to our chastity and fidelity, to the (very low!) amount of partners we have and our loyalty to them, whether requested or not.
This is what feeds the Prohibitionist arguments that sex work is the ultimate in damaging, if you’re having meaningless sex, what is that doing to your integrity? How can you have integrity when you genitals are so… Available?!

But integrity isn’t located in your junk.

Integrity is deep inside you, something no one can touch or tarnish, and only you can damage it or destroy t or give it away.
It’s connected to honor and ethics and conducting yourself in a way you can always be proud of; of being honest and true to your word and saying what you mean and meaning what you say, and pride, pride in yourself and what you do and the meaning you give with your life.

Integrity is what we have, and it’s all we have, and it’s the most important thing in the world to me.

One of the problems that the marijuana reform movement consistently faces is that everyone wants to talk about what marijuana does, but no one ever wants to look at what marijuana prohibition does. Marijuana never kicks down your door in the middle of the night. Marijuana never locks up sick and dying people, does not suppress medical research, does not peek in bedroom windows. Even if one takes every reefer madness allegation of the prohibitionists at face value, marijuana prohibition has done far more harm to far more people than marijuana ever could.
—  Richard Cowan
One of the problems that the marijuana reform movement consistently faces is that everyone wants to talk about what marijuana does, but no one ever wants to look at what marijuana prohibition does. Marijuana never kicks down your door in the middle of the night. Marijuana never locks up sick and dying people, does not suppress medical research, does not peek in bedroom windows. Even if one takes every reefer madness allegation of the prohibitionists at face value, marijuana prohibition has done far more harm to far more people than marijuana ever could.
—  Richard Cowan
2

Submission call for the winter issue of Working It: Stigma and Violence
(I know, the illustrations aren’t on theme)

Based around the December 17th memorial and call to end violence against sex workers, this issue explores the violence sex workers of all trades face: violence enshrined in law, socially sanctioned violence, the violence of stigma, including the extralegal (but winked at) violence of serial killers, families, foster care and social workers as well as the prison system against us.

Firsthand personal accounts and stories
writings about legally sanctioned violence (such as the laws in Oakland that make it mandatory for a landlord to kick out a sex worker)
the ways the law allows people–from social workers to law enforcement–to take advantage of, extort, assault us

The violent ways that law enforcement talks about us (a Portland DA referring to child commercial sexual exploitation as “the juicy stuff”)
The way our lived experiences are taken from us along WITH our lives to promote the agendas that hurt us
The prohibitionists who refer to us as fuck meat and the violence that does

AS WELL AS ART along any theme, not just violence

And the usual columns:

Client hall of shame

Go to Health: stis, sexual and emotional health

Tales from the shift (your best, worst, or funniest interactions at work)

Spread legal–new laws, laws in other areas, upcoming laws and pushes for end demand

Pets and money are always cheering!

Sex worker friendly medical and health providers anywhere that you know of

And reports of BAD DATES, again Portland specific but I will take anywhere and publicize it everywhere I have access too to make sure it reaches people.


PLEASE SUBMIT AND SHARE!!!!

I wish Prohibitionist feminists would realise that our rights are their rights too. They won’t fully have rights until we have rights, and criminalising us and driving us underground only makes their own freedom and justice that much farther away from them.