progress booking

  • Male Scifi and Fantasy writers: Look at this !Strong! female character! She can fight and solve puzzles, and ends up with the sidekick not the hero! Isn't she a great character?
  • Everyone: No, she's one-dimensional and still only exists to please the hero's ego
  • Male scifi and fantasy writers: You're never happy! This is how characters are written! Besides, it's much harder for us to write women because we are men!
  • Terry Pratchett: *creates a female character who is literally the embodyment of a dog, sets her up to be the love interest of Protagonist Hero Man.* *writes her as clever, emotionally tortured, lonely and powerful* *uses her to explore difficulties of bisexuality and masculine dominated workforces*
  • Terry Pratchett: *Creates a pair of old witches, one of whom is a virgin and the other who has slept with lots of men.* *makes them best friends, never dismisses one lifestyle of the other, explains lifestyle choices based on characters history and personality, uses this to develop each character as the books progress*
  • Terry Pratchett: *Writes Sybil Rankin* *makes the powerful rich lady heavy set but beautiful, never plays her by her looks, develops her as she ages, acknowledges the way society views such people and then spits on their attitudes* *does it again with Agnes*
  • Terry Pratchett: *Writes a book about an entire army secretly being women, creates complex female relationships, introduces same sex relationships completely naturally*
  • Terry Pratchett: *takes old joke about female dwarves and uses it to explore gender identity without making it seem forced or unnatural, carefully discusses some of the issues and complextities whilst still making funny and witty observasions and maintaining genuine fantasy tropes*
  • Terry Pratchett: *DOES THIS ALL OVER AND OVER AGAIN, DEVELOPING CHARACTERS AS HIS VEIW OF THE WORLD DEVELOPS AND CAREFULLY APOLOGIZES FOR EARLY MISTAKES*
All The Topics to Know for the APUSH Exam (as told by my APUSH teacher)
  • Revolutionary War/Constitution/Articles of Confederation
  • The First Party System: Federalists and Republicans
  • Revolution of 1800
  • Jacksonian Democracy (1824-1840)
    • the Bank War
    • the spoils system
    • Indian Removal Act
  • Antebellum reform movements and the Second Great Awakening
  • Causes of the Civil War and sectional differences
    • political parties (Democrats vs. New Republicans)
    • economics
    • social differences
  • Reconstruction (1863-1877)
    • successes/failures
    • 13th - 15th amendments
      • connections to the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s
  • Industrialization and Big Business/The Gilded Age (1860-1910)
    • vertical and horizontal integration
    • trusts
    • steel, oil, and railroads
    • Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, J.P. Morgan
    • growth of cities
    • immigration
    • changes in politics and political machines
  • The Populist Movement and agrarian discontent
  • The Progressive Era (1890-1920)
    • an effort to deal with the adverse effects of industrial capitalism
    • the Progressive Presidents
  • The Indian Plains Wars (through 1890)
  • Spanish-American War (1898)
  • IMPERIALISM: Philippines, Hawaii, Panama, Cuba, etc.
  • World War I
    • causes/effects
    • the home front
  • The Red Scare
  • The 1920s
    • sources of conflict (economic, political, and social)
    • effects on women, African Americans, and immigrants
  • The 1930s, the Great Depression, and the New Deal
    • Hoover vs. FDR
    • economic, social, and political reforms
  • World War II
    • results, the home front
    • effects on women, African Americans, Native Americans (Navajo codetalkers, etc), Japanese Americans, and Mexican Americans
  • The Cold War
    • foreign policy
      • where and when
    • 1950s
      • conformity, suburbs, Baby Boom, domestication of women, challenges to conformity, expanding economy, consumer culture
      • similarities to the 1920s
    • 1960s
      • civil rights movement (who, what, when, where, why, successes and failures)
      • Lyndon B. Johnson and the Great Society (1963-1968)
        • domestic and foreign issues
    • 1970s
      • Richard Nixon (1968-1973)
        • foreign and domestic policies
        • detente and Vietnam
        • the Southern Strategy and Watergate
    • 1980s
      • Ronald Reagan (1981-1989)
        • foreign and domestic policies
        • tax cuts
        • military spending
        • shrinking of the government
        • the new right
      • George H.W. Bush and the end of the Cold War
  • Bill Clinton and Barack Obama

anonymous asked:

for someone who is looking to adopt an older dog in about six months - what dog training books/resources do you recommend?

Ahhh so exciting! A few that rise to the top for me:

Books

  • Decoding Your Dog - American College of Veterinary Behaviorists
  • Love Has No Age Limit: Welcoming An Adopted Dog Into Your Home - Patricia McConnell
  • Bones Would Rain From the Sky - Suzanne Clothier
  • The Other End of the Leash - Patricia McConnell
  • Don’t Shoot the Dog - Karen Pyor (link to free pdf)
    Before You Get Your Puppy and After You Get Your Puppy - Ian Dunbar (link to free pdfs)
  • On Talking Terms with Dogs: Calming Signals - Turid Rugaas
  • Control Unleashed - Leslie McDevitt
  • How to Behave So Your Dog Behaves - Sophia Yin
  • The Power of Positive Dog Training - Pat Miller

Blogs 

YouTube Channels

Other Online Resources

  • Dr. Sophia Yin 
  • The Whole Dog Journal (there’s a paywall for some of their articles, but much of it is free)
  • Sue Ailsby’s Training Levels (I don’t see these on peoples’ radar as often as some of the other resources on this list, but they’re a real gem! Simple, clear structure for building and proofing behaviors in little steps. The old version published in 2000 is available free online, but the fuller, updated 2010 version can be purchased here.)

The Association of Professional Dog Trainers also has an extensive recommended reading list with other ideas!

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Since I see sooo many BOS/Grimoire pages everyday, I figured I’d show one of the ones I’m working on 😁
This is from my third Grimoire. A basic Dragon Call.
My other two books are nearly finished, but I do not know how I feel about sharing them :x
But here is my current work in progress 😇 I love metallic tones! They fit dragons nicely 💜 Everything is writ and drawn in archival inks, so they will never fade 🌹
I mainly feel no problem showing this page as the sigil is from a tumblr user (i cannot find her atm, unfortunetly) 💘

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Today, Home turns two years old ♥

(And I thought I’d wrap it up in three months… Whoops)! Thank you for your constant support, patience, and kudos (all 12,700 of them?)!! This project has really gotten me through some tough anxiety (and lupus, apparently) whilst introducing me to the wonderful, talented, empathetic, and creative sterek fandom. I’m honored to be friends with so many of you *hugs*

The final chapter is still in progress, as is book!Home! I’m eager to share both with you soon. ♥

Cosmere Gothic

You should read Mistborn by Brandon Sanderson, someone tells you. You pick up the first book. You quite like Kelsier.

Although Vin is badass, you wish there were more female characters. Just wait until Wax and Wayne, your friend tells you. You do not know what that means.

Your friend tells you to keep an eye out for a guy named Hoid. You do. You do not see what’s so notable about him, but you remember the name.

You progress to the second book. You miss Kelsier. Why is Elend so naive? You rant.

You are worried about Marsh.

You start the third book. You do not understand anything. Your friend keeps talking about shards. Shards of what, you ask? They do not answer. No one answers you. You are alone, with far too many questions and no answers, just like Marsh.

You root for Spook.

You are concerned about Spook.

“When I said I missed Kelsier, this isn’t what I wanted!” you cry out to the void.

Your friend tells you to pay attention to Demoux’s physical description. You do, and then you promptly forget it.

You are bothered when Vin flees Fadrex on a recon mission. You do not understand. You find no answers the further you read.

Just thirty more pages, you tell yourself. Your favorite characters can make it thirty more pages.

You cry.

“What’s wrong?” your friend asks when you call them sobbing.
“I finished Mistborn,” you say. “Oh,” they say, “I’m so sorry.”

Your friend tells you to read Warbreaker. You like the world of Mistborn. You don’t want to read a completely different series. You want more Mistborn.

Your friend smiles. You read Warbreaker.

You do not understand. Why is Hoid here?

It is time, your friend says ominously, for you to read Stormlight Archive.

You have many questions. Some of these are answered. Many are not, and you gain new questions. You fall in love with Jasnah Kholin.

You find the Coppermind. This does not clarify anything. The more answers you find the more questions you have.

Your friend laughs at your plight. You have no true friends anymore. Only an endless supply of questions.

You read Mistborn Era 2. You have very strong opinions about Wayne. You worship MeLaan as a true goddess in her own right. You are concerned about Sazed.

You finish Bands of Mourning. You scream into the void. I fell for it once already, you tell yourself, I will not fall for it again. Kelsier isn’t really back. Right?

Cackling, eyes brimming with the fires of inner madness, your friend hands you a duct-taped tome. On the cover, etched in faded silver ink that has seen the rise and fall of empires, you can just make out the words “Arcanum Unbounded.”

There are mysterious stains on many pages indicating that your friend either performed satanic blood rituals over the book or stayed up late reading it while eating spaghetti with red sauce. Either is likely, and you do not know which scares you more.

You stare numbly at the wall. School does not move you and neither does work.

You are scared. You are scared of what you do not understand, which is more than ever. You are scared of Kelsier. You are scared of the mysterious gray people (don’t bother with Elantris, your friend told you once). And most importantly you are scared of Hoid.