produce label

I’m sad, so sad and mad that Hyunwoo did not make it to the next round. When it showed how everyone else from his company made it besides him, it hurt me, but when they showed who got the 60th rank, and he wasn’t that person, I but into tears. He is the only reason why I cried. Hearing Moonbok talk about him it made me cry so much too, and seeing Hyunwoo cried literally took every once of wanting to keep seeing this show out of me.

Keep reading

Can Conscious K-Pop Cross Over? BTS & BigHit Entertainment CEO ‘Hitman’ Bang on Taking America

On April 2, BTS played the fifth and final date of a sold-out U.S. arena run, performing to the shrieking fans who helped the group’s second full-length album, Wings, become the first K-pop project to crack the top 40 of the Billboard 200 in 2016. Since debuting in 2013, the seven-piece boy band has become a commercial behemoth in its native South Korea while continuing to make inroads within American pop culture. “Change,” an English-language hip-hop collaboration between BTS member Rap Monster and U.S. star Wale, was released three days before the kickoff of the stateside run.

“Change” touches on topics like voting rights and online harassment, while some of BTS’ biggest hits have addressed mental health. “Worldwide, our young generation shares the same issues socially and politically,” says BTS member Suga. Although K-pop music generally steers away from controversy, Rap Monster says that remaining outspoken “is important to us. And the bigger the voice we get, the more powerful our words become.”

A new BTS album is already underway and more U.S. dates might be on the way later this year. Bang Si Hyuk, the CEO and Executive Producer of label/management agency BigHit Entertainment who is better known as “Hitman” Bang, hints at “special features” designed for international listeners but thinks BTS will continue playing to its base.

“I’m not a believer in releasing full English songs to the U.S. market, like many K-pop artists have,” Bang tells Billboard in his first-ever interview with American press. “We must focus on what we do best as K-pop artists and producers and maybe add some special features to which international or U.S. music fans can feel attached. That is the best way for me to put K-pop into the mainstream U.S. music market and, in that regard, BTS will participate and perform in a way that is not much different from what they have been doing in the last three years. We’re adjusting and improving the way we do shows on the tour to meet the international or global level and expectations so that anyone, regardless of their culture and background, can enjoy BTS music and performances.”

Bang is sure to add that the group will be “very active and responsive in releasing new songs that would come out of collaborations with international artists, like 'Change.’” And, looking ahead, both the CEO and band see their most recent accomplishments as inspiration to achieve even more in the future.

“I’m so excited and thrilled at the response to the U.S. tour,” Bang says. “It’s still overwhelming and unbelievable at some point. I even further feel responsible for producing better music and production for fans around the world and I’d definitely think harder on what makes fans enthusiastic and passionate about BTS music and the band.” Meanwhile, the ambition within the group is perhaps best felt when member V winks that the group has “grander goals”; as if arena shows are just the beginning of what he and his band mates plan to accomplish around the world.

Below read on for an extended interview with BTS held before the tour kicked off. All member answers are taken via a translator except for Rap Monster.

With five arena shows, this tour is so huge and I think the main reason for that and why you guys are doing so well in America is because you sing about personal topics. Why is that so important to talk about in your music?

​Suga: Worldwide, our young generation shares the same issues socially and politically. I think that young people feel the same way about similar issues and BTS wants to cheer them up with our songs and talk about our feelings and social issues.

Rap Monster: These topics, like you said, they’re important, right? They should be told by someone. Someone should talk about it. And if someone should talk about it, then it feels like we have to talk about it. It’s very much an honor that we get power and attention from our fans them when we use our voices more. It’s important to us and the bigger the voice that we get, the more powerful that our words become.

These topics – loneliness, mental health, bullying – you don’t hear about in K-pop or even Korean culture much. Or, really, in American pop music either. Have you ever worried it might get a negative or opposite response?

​Suga: There are people who think negatively and there have been people who react negatively towards BTS’ music. But I think it’s way more important to make music with those issues because I think it’s important to encourage people to fight for those issues and, through the music, have a resolution for those issues. But I’m going to continue to talk about those issues through the music anyway. [Laughs]

Do you think K-pop needs to get more personal to gain a wider audience? Would you like to see that more in future?

Rap Monster: We still need some party songs, we still need some light love songs. I love to listen to them and feel the vibe from that. Everyone has their luggage and their shadows, but it’s up to everyone’s own [devices]. But we’re us. I think if we talk about it and if it gets more voice and attention, then maybe there are a lot of people in the world that accept us start to talk about those issues. I think that’s the change.

I thought “Spring Day” was a really big musical moment for you guys. Not only did it do really well on the charts, but this time you were showing a progression in thinking and a message of hope. The idea of recovering and winter moving to spring. Was that a conscious decision?

Rap Monster: It’s just like what you said, that was one step further. We’re always talking about the crises, the sorrows and youth’s feelings of getting lost. In many [television] programs, when we’d introduce our new album, I’d always talk about the word “recovery.” Like you said, it’s all about the recovery. Winter going to spring. The middle of the winter going to the spring. You got that.

​Suga: In addition to being what we are as BTS, we wanted to bring some changes and we actually wanted to evolve as a group. We wanted to show our many colors, but we still want to console others and give hope to others.

Something that was unique was all the solo songs on the Wings album. You’ve done mixtapes, but instead of full-fledged solo or unit releases, you got to show your different sides of yourselves. Why was that necessary?

Jin: The solo tracks were important because it was personal, an individual story and it was represented in the way that we are good at it. We worked a lot on each track and that’s why it was important to each of us.

Rap Monster: When I get questions about why is K-pop is so popular; I always tell them K-pop is like a great mix of music, videos, visuals, choreography, social media and real-life contents. Making the solo tracks on the album was quite a venture, but it’s connected to the concept. Like, when you watch the “I Need U” video, everyone has their own crises and characters. It’s kind of connected to our real personalities and characters, but the solo songs have their own characters and personalities. It’s all connected. It’s a mixture and that’s why people get interested in the concepts.

Speaking of solo songs, “Change” recently came out. Rap Monster, you and Wale are talking about different-but-similar issues when South Korea and America are both having interesting political times. Did you guys have a chance to discuss your different viewpoints?

Rap Monster: We didn’t have the time to get into it deeply, but I’m always watching the news about Trump and America; I always watch. When he first suggested a collaboration, I was like, “What should we do?” We could just do you know, a common hip-hop song, but I wanted to do a little more special. We have our political situation in Korea and the students are very angry. So, I think, if we talked about what’s going on, then we’ll have a real special collaboration. I think my guess was right and it became special.

Do you see or feel your influence among other groups in the industry?

​Jungkook: When we debuted back in 2013, we were influenced by our sunbaenim [Korean word for “senior”]. Over the years, as we watched other younger groups, we know they talk about us, they cover us and they follow us. I think they’re saying in interviews that they learned a lot from us and that makes us feel great. Being a sunbaenim, we want to be a good influence and be a better role model to other groups.

Last question, are you happy?

V: For now, we are very happy as we are, as a group, together. And I think we are happy because we are walking on the same path, walking the same direction. We wanted to get Daesang [Best of the Year award], but we have it already so our goal is to make great music, to share it with our fans.

Rap Monster: And a worldwide, stadium tour. That’s the goal.

V: We have grander goals.

© Jeff Benjamin @ Billboard

anonymous asked:

I think the lyrics are : "when I run out of ROAD, you bring me home. Regardless, "two hearts in one home" -- aside from living with Anne, Gemma, Des, Robin/ stepdads, he has shared a home with Ben, Meredith, and Louis. I can't think of anyone else. Crashing on Ed's couch doesn't count. The only YOUNG people on the above list are: Gemma & Louis. I dare anyone to tell me, by this logic, that this song is not a love letter to Louis.

Sweet Creature Lyrics

[Verse 1]
Sweet creature
Had another talk about where it’s going wrong
But we’re still young
We don’t know where we’re going
But we know where we belong

[Pre-Chorus]
No, we started
Two hearts in one home
It’s hard when we argue
We’re both stubborn, I know

[Chorus]
But oh, sweet creature, sweet creature
Wherever I go, you bring me home
Sweet creature, sweet creature
When I run out of rope, you bring me home

[Verse 2]
Sweet creature
We’re running through the garden
Where nothing bothered us
But we’re still young
I always think about you and how we don’t speak enough

[Pre-Chorus]
No, we started
Two hearts in one home
It’s hard when we argue
We’re both stubborn, I know

[Chorus]
But oh
Sweet creature, sweet creature
Wherever I go, you bring me home
Sweet creature, sweet creature
When I run out of rope, you bring me home

[Bridge]
I know when we started
Just two hearts in one home
It gets harder when we argue
We’re both stubborn, I know

[Chorus]
Sweet creature, sweet creature
Wherever I go, you bring me home
Sweet creature, sweet creature
When I run out of rope, you bring me home
You bring me home


From https://amp/s/genius.com/amp/Harry-styles-sweet-creature-lyrics


Track info:

Produced By: Tyler Johnson, Kid Harpoon, Alex Salibian, Jeff Bhasker
Written By: Thomas Hull, Harry Styles
Release Date: May 2, 2017
Recorded At: Jeff Bhasker’s Home Studio, Geejam Hotel Recording Studio
Executive Produced By: Jeff Bhasker
Label: Erskine Records distributed by Columbia Records

Caveat: lyrics are from Genius Lyrics, which has been known to be wrong. Once I get liner notes from the CD, I’ll correct. Sorry for any wrong info.
'Can Conscious K-Pop Cross Over? BTS & BigHit Entertainment CEO 'Hitman' Bang on Taking America (Interview by Jeff Benjamin)'

On April 2, BTS played the fifth and final date of a sold-out U.S. arena run, performing to the shrieking fans who helped the group’s second full-length album, Wings, become the first K-pop project to crack the top 40 of the Billboard 200 in 2016. Since debuting in 2013, the seven-piece boy band has become a commercial behemoth in its native South Korea while continuing to make inroads within American pop culture. “Change,” an English-language hip-hop collaboration between BTS member Rap Monster and U.S. star Wale, was released three days before the kickoff of the stateside run.

“Change” touches on topics like voting rights and online harassment, while some of BTS’ biggest hits have addressed mental health. “Worldwide, our young generation shares the same issues socially and politically,” says BTS member Suga. Although K-pop music generally steers away from controversy, Rap Monster says that remaining outspoken “is important to us. And the bigger the voice we get, the more powerful our words become.”

A new BTS album is already underway and more U.S. dates might be on the way later this year. Bang Si Hyuk, the CEO and Executive Producer of label/management agency BigHit Entertainment who is better known as “Hitman” Bang, hints at “special features” designed for international listeners but thinks BTS will continue playing to its base.

“I’m not a believer in releasing full English songs to the U.S. market, like many K-pop artists have,” Bang tells Billboard in his first-ever interview with American press. “We must focus on what we do best as K-pop artists and producers and maybe add some special features to which international or U.S. music fans can feel attached. That is the best way for me to put K-pop into the mainstream U.S. music market and, in that regard, BTS will participate and perform in a way that is not much different from what they have been doing in the last three years. We’re adjusting and improving the way we do shows on the tour to meet the international or global level and expectations so that anyone, regardless of their culture and background, can enjoy BTS music and performances.”

Bang is sure to add that the group will be “very active and responsive in releasing new songs that would come out of collaborations with international artists, like ‘Change.’” And, looking ahead, both the CEO and band see their most recent accomplishments as inspiration to achieve even more in the future.

“I’m so excited and thrilled at the response to the U.S. tour,” Bang says. “It’s still overwhelming and unbelievable at some point. I even further feel responsible for producing better music and production for fans around the world and I’d definitely think harder on what makes fans enthusiastic and passionate about BTS music and the band.” Meanwhile, the ambition within the group is perhaps best felt when member V winks that the group has “grander goals”; as if arena shows are just the beginning of what he and his band mates plan to accomplish around the world.

With five arena shows, this tour is so huge and I think the main reason for that and why you guys are doing so well in America is because you sing about personal topics. Why is that so important to talk about in your music?

​Suga: Worldwide, our young generation shares the same issues socially and politically. I think that young people feel the same way about similar issues and BTS wants to cheer them up with our songs and talk about our feelings and social issues.

Rap Monster: These topics, like you said, they’re important, right? They should be told by someone. Someone should talk about it. And if someone should talk about it, then it feels like we have to talk about it. It’s very much an honor that we get power and attention from our fans them when we use our voices more. It’s important to us and the bigger the voice that we get, the more powerful that our words become.

These topics – loneliness, mental health, bullying – you don’t hear about in K-pop or even Korean culture much. Or, really, in American pop music either. Have you ever worried it might get a negative or opposite response?

​Suga: There are people who think negatively and there have been people who react negatively towards BTS’ music. But I think it’s way more important to make music with those issues because I think it’s important to encourage people to fight for those issues and, through the music, have a resolution for those issues. But I’m going to continue to talk about those issues through the music anyway. [Laughs]

Do you think K-pop needs to get more personal to gain a wider audience? Would you like to see that more in future?

Rap Monster: We still need some party songs, we still need some light love songs. I love to listen to them and feel the vibe from that. Everyone has their luggage and their shadows, but it’s up to everyone’s own [devices]. But we’re us. I think if we talk about it and if it gets more voice and attention, then maybe there are a lot of people in the world that accept us start to talk about those issues. I think that’s the change.

I thought “Spring Day” was a really big musical moment for you guys. Not only did it do really well on the charts, but this time you were showing a progression in thinking and a message of hope. The idea of recovering and winter moving to spring. Was that a conscious decision?

Rap Monster: It’s just like what you said, that was one step further. We’re always talking about the crises, the sorrows and youth’s feelings of getting lost. In many [television] programs, when we’d introduce our new album, I’d always talk about the word “recovery.” Like you said, it’s all about the recovery. Winter going to spring. The middle of the winter going to the spring. You got that.

​Suga: In addition to being what we are as BTS, we wanted to bring some changes and we actually wanted to evolve as a group. We wanted to show our many colors, but we still want to console others and give hope to others.

Something that was unique was all the solo songs on the Wings album. You’ve done mixtapes, but instead of full-fledged solo or unit releases, you got to show your different sides of yourselves. Why was that necessary?

Jin: The solo tracks were important because it was personal, an individual story and it was represented in the way that we are good at it. We worked a lot on each track and that’s why it was important to each of us.

Rap Monster: When I get questions about why is K-pop is so popular; I always tell them K-pop is like a great mix of music, videos, visuals, choreography, social media and real-life contents. Making the solo tracks on the album was quite a venture, but it’s connected to the concept. Like, when you watch the “I Need U” video, everyone has their own crises and characters. It’s kind of connected to our real personalities and characters, but the solo songs have their own characters and personalities. It’s all connected. It’s a mixture and that’s why people get interested in the concepts.

Speaking of solo songs, “Change” recently came out. Rap Monster, you and Wale are talking about different-but-similar issues when South Korea and America are both having interesting political times. Did you guys have a chance to discuss your different viewpoints?

Rap Monster: We didn’t have the time to get into it deeply, but I’m always watching the news about Trump and America; I always watch. When he first suggested a collaboration, I was like, “What should we do?” We could just do you know, a common hip-hop song, but I wanted to do a little more special. We have our political situation in Korea and the students are very angry. So, I think, if we talked about what’s going on, then we’ll have a real special collaboration. I think my guess was right and it became special.

Do you see or feel your influence among other groups in the industry?

​Jungkook: When we debuted back in 2013, we were influenced by our sunbaenim [Korean word for “senior”]. Over the years, as we watched other younger groups, we know they talk about us, they cover us and they follow us. I think they’re saying in interviews that they learned a lot from us and that makes us feel great. Being a sunbaenim, we want to be a good influence and be a better role model to other groups.

Last question, are you happy?

V: For now, we are very happy as we are, as a group, together. And I think we are happy because we are walking on the same path, walking the same direction. We wanted to get Daesang [Best of the Year award], but we have it already so our goal is to make great music, to share it with our fans.

Rap Monster: And a worldwide, stadium tour. That’s the goal.

V: We have grander goals.

I absolutely hated C group’s vocal training session; they weren’t taking Shin Yoonmi seriously just because she’s a woman. All they kept saying was that she’s pretty. Seong Hyunwoo didn’t even take her criticism seriously. As for Bae Jinyoung, well, she was helping and encouraging him but he still stopped singing. She even kept clapping just in case he wanted to try again, but all that the C group trainees could say was that she’s scary. Maybe it’s just MNet’s horrible editing, but it just doesn’t seem fair that Lee Sukhoon was treated with so much more respect.

Hip Hop Would Not Be The Success It Is Today If It Wasn’t For This Pioneering Woman.....

After watching her family on the reality series, The First Family of Hip Hop, I wanted to know more about Mrs. Robinson and her contribution to hip-hop which we don’t hear being acknowledged much. While creating this post, I’m also reminded about a post from a few weeks ago in my archive about black women’s contribution to music in which one of my fellow sista follower/blogger said and I’m probably paraphrasing, “I wouldn’t be surprised if a black woman invented hip hop.”

Sylvia Robinson (née Vanderpool; March 6, 1935 – September 29, 2011) was an American singer, musician, record producer, and record label executive. Robinson was best known for her work as founder/CEO of the hip hop label Sugar Hill Records.[3] Robinson is credited as the driving force behind two landmark singles in the genre; “Rapper’s Delight” (1979) by the Sugarhill Gang,[4] and “The Message” (1982) by Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five; which dubbed her as the “Mother of Hip-Hop”. Robinson received a Pioneer Award for her career in singing and being the founder of Sugarhill Records at the 11th Annual Rhythm and Blues Awards Gala in 2000.[5] Robinson died of congestive heart failure on September 29, 2011 at age 76.


A movie about her life story is in the works. Read about it here.





I Salute this AMAZING HER-STORY Making Sista!

Idk if they already have the final line up or not, but I feel like Mnet is too biased to some of the trainees. Many of the trainees’ screentime are cut and some I’ve never seen their face before. I see Haknyeon, Euiwoong and Kenta in upper rank, and I don’t see them in the show. Park Woojin, Kim Taedong, and many more are in As and Bs, but I’ve never got to remember their faces.

anonymous asked:

Hi! Why do u think harry said SOTT was the most literal song on the album when literally sweet creature is?....

This is purely my opinion, but I actually don’t think of either song as very literal. 

I will use this video to discuss Sweet Creatures:

Information about the song:

Produced By: Tyler Johnson, Kid Harpoon, Alex Salibian, Jeff Bhasker
Written By: Thomas Hull, Harry Styles
Release Date: May 2, 2017
Recorded At: Jeff Bhasker’s Home Studio, Geejam Hotel Recording Studio
Executive Produced By: Jeff Bhasker
Label: Erskine Records distributed by Columbia Records

Sign of the Times was a song containing apocalyptic, eschatological symbols describing a separation and an impossible escape. 

In his Rolling Stone interview, the song was described as a mother’s parting words to her newborn:

“Most of the stuff that hurts me about what’s going on at the moment is not politics, it’s fundamentals,” Styles says. “Equal rights. For everyone, all races, sexes, everything. …  'Sign of the Times’ came from ‘This isn’t the first time we’ve been in a hard time, and it’s not going to be the last time.’ The song is written from a point of view as if a mother was giving birth to a child and there’s a complication. The mother is told, ‘The child is fine, but you’re not going to make it.’ The mother has five minutes to tell the child, ‘Go forth and conquer.’”

Perhaps there were lyrics that were literal in Harry’s biography. We’ll never know which ones they are. I think the same applies for Sweet Creature. Is it autobiographical? Maybe. I can only discuss what the song says and how it chooses to say it. 

I think the title of a song is always very telling. If I Could Fly is about a melancholic yearning, even though the refrain is “for your eyes only.”

Keep reading

2

Motionless In White: Graveyard Shift

Released: 5/5/2017
Recorded: 2016
Length: 48:06
Label: Roadrunner
Producer: Drew Fulk

Track List:

  1. Rats
  2. Queen For Queen
  3. Necessary Evil (Feat. Jonathan Davis)
  4. Soft
  5. Untouchable
  6. Not My Type: Dead As Fuck 2
  7. The Ladder
  8. Voices
  9. LOUD (Fuck It)
  10. 570
  11. Hourglass
  12. Eternally Yours

Chris Motionless - All Vocals
Ricky Horror - Guitar
Ryan Sitkowski - Guitar
Devin “Ghost” Sola - Bass
Vinny Mauro – Drums

youtube

Libre Shuppan revealed a sample of Caste Heaven Drama CD volume 2 produced by Cue Egg Label. It will be released on the 19th of July.

that post of OT4 recording in studios as solo artists….. they are so grown up… they were kids two days ago, i swear…and look at them now, out there singing and producing, owning labels and companies, writing, playing instruments… i am so proud of them cause with all they have been through and still are going through, it takes a lion heart to carry on doing what you love despite all the problems you might find in your path. i wish them all the best and i can’t wait for more bright things to come their way. 

[ARTICLE] G-Dragon Hints At Upcoming Album Created Under YG Producer Teddy’s Label

On April 18, YG Entertainment confirmed that BIGBANG’s G-Dragon will be releasing a new album soon!

A source from YG Entertainment stated, “G-Dragon is continuously working on his solo album. The release plans have not been decided yet, but the artist is going back and forth from YG Entertainment and The Black Label Studio to work on his songs.”

The Black Label is a label that was created by YG Entertainment’s producer Teddy.

The agency added, “G-Dragon is planning to release his new album before his solo concert in June.”

On the same day that the news was announced, G-Dragon uploaded a photo of himself in the recording studio on his Instagram. In the photo, the singer looks quite different than usual with his beard.

Meanwhile, G-Dragon will be holding his solo concert titled “G-DRAGON 2017 CONCERT: ACT III, M.O.T.T.E” on June 10 in Seoul.

Are you looking forward to his new album?

© Soompi

The Last Five Years || Conor

Conor masterpost found here

Word count - 1,152

Summary - The one based off of The Last Five Years.

-

(Y/N),

I called Jack to help me pack my bags. I went downtown and closed the bank account. It’s not about another shrink. It’s not about another compromise. I’m not the only one who’s hurting here. I don’t know what the hell is left to do. You never saw how far the crack had opened. You never knew I had run out of rope and I could never rescue you. All you ever wanted was for me to rescue you but I couldn’t no matter how I tried. All I could do was love you hard and let you go. God, I loved you. So we could fight or we could wait or I could go.

You read the letter over and over again, blinked back the tears just to keep reading it, just to make sure you had read it properly. Surely the ring left beside the sealed envelop with your name on it told you that you had.

Conor had left you.

The last five years with him flashed in your head every time you read the letter. You remembered the day you met him, in LA while he was at Vidcon. You hadn’t gone to Vidcon but you were on holiday there in LA and ran into him on the streets. You fell for his eyes first. You couldn’t remember how the rest went. Hell, you couldn’t even remember who gave the other their number first. But you remembered how his eyes shined like the bright California sun.

You remembered meeting up with him once you were both back in London. The coffee dates, the walks in the park, the evening dinners that lead to a little bit more as the night wore down. Then the day he met your parents. The day you met his. The day you suggested you moved in together. The day he said yes. You were so happy to be with him. So happy to be in love with him.

You had dreams of being an actress, but those dreams were hard to make a reality. Failed audition after failed audition, there were so many days that you just came home, curled up in a ball on the couch, and talked to Conor about how you were sure you were destined to fail and become a sad and pathetic housewife for the rest of your life. You remembered one day in particular. He sat you up and sang you a song he had been working on. Classic Conor. His career in music was already taking off. He spent half of his time writing songs and the other half going to meetings and dinners with people on his label.

The song served to cheer you up. He took your hand and the two of you danced around the room. For the few minutes you danced, you forgot why you had been so sad in the first place. He had a way of doing that to you. Once he finished his song, he took your hands in his and looked in your eyes. “I believe in you,” he told you firmly. Then, he handed you a folded up newspaper and said, “Here are all the open auditions in town. There’s about a hundred roles you would be perfect for.” You smiled gently and took the paper from his hand. “I can get Oli to take some great head shots of you. It’ll be perfect. I believe in you.”

“Thank you,” you said quietly.

“I love you,” he said with a smile.

“I love you too.”

And then you got a part in a real show. You were so happy. Conor was happy too, he really was. He was just so caught up in work. That’s how it usually was. After an audition that you thought went particularly well you’d call him. You were almost always brought to voicemail these days. Hours later he’d text you and say he was proud and sorry that he missed your call. Work was just so busy. Gotta finish that album. Gotta talk about shows and a tour. Wouldn’t it be cool to tour? You could go with him. Life on the road.

Then there was the wedding. It was small, just your closest friends and family. God, you were so happy to marry him. You felt like, even though his work was crazy, him marrying you was his way of showing you that nothing was ever more important than you were. 

The honeymoon stage faded quickly. It was always work. It was always his work and never yours. Your auditions didn’t matter as much as a new song he had written. Then there were always those damn parties. His producers and managers and label always threw dinner parties and he always had to go. He would tell you it meant so much for you to go along, but then he’d abandon you almost as soon as you walked through the door. It didn’t always used to be like that. He used to walk with you proudly on his arm, introduce you to everyone in the room. But then the music became more important. The job and the people to impress. It all became more important than you.

You knew he was cheating. The weekends away, the never going to your shows, the missed phone calls and stupid pictures with him and other girls on Instagram. You knew it. You talked to him about it, accused him and fought with him, but he always denied it. Even after smelling the perfume on his shirts or seeing the lipstick stains on his collar, he denied it. You were too hopeful to leave. You were sure he’d stop, sure he’d remember why he loved you in the first place. Sure he’d apologize and change his ways and come right back to you. Sure.

But he never did.

You reread the note again, just to be sure you had read it right. You even looked around, wondering if there were cameras set up. Maybe Jack needed a video idea and thought this sick twisted prank would be a good idea. But there was nothing. Nothing except the note, his set of keys, and a simple gold band sitting on the table. He had new dreams to pursue now, probably new people to meet. Probably a new girl to be in love with.

Looking back, you still didn’t know how it all went wrong, how two people so in love could fall so out of it so quickly. Had it been you? Were you not enough? Did the job consume him? Did your jealousy consume you? Were you just two puzzle pieces that were never quite meant to fit together? Maybe you had just spent the last five years forcing them together. Eventually, with enough forcing, one of them was bound to break. With him leaving, you weren’t sure who had ended up more broken. 

youtube

On this day in music history: March 20, 1986 - “Rapture”, the second album by Anita Baker is released. Produced by Michael J. Powell, Marti Sharron and Gary Skardina, it is recorded at Yamaha R&D Studios in Los Angeles, CA, Music Grinder Studios in Hollywood, CA and United Sound Studios in Detroit, MI from Mid 1985 - Early 1986. After making a solid impression with her debut album “The Songstress” in 1983, Anita Baker finds her career progress halted when she becomes mired in a lawsuit with Beverly Glen Records. Seeking to end her relationship with the label for non-payment of royalties, the label counter sues her for breach of contract. The case takes nearly two years to settle, but it is in Baker’s favor, allowing her to field offers from other record labels. Anita is signed to Elektra Records in 1985, giving her more autonomy and creative control. To produce her major label debut, Baker enlists Michael J. Powell, her former Chapter 8 band mate to work on the project. Initially, A&R at Elektra are not pleased, feeling that a “name” producer should work with her, but label president Bob Krasnow allows the singer to go with her original choice.  Powell assembles a team of top studio musicians including  bassists Louis Johnson (The Brothers Johnson), Jimmy Haslip (The Yellowjackets), Nathan East (Eric Clapton), “Ready” Freddie Washington (Patrice Rushen), Neil Stubenhaus, Earth, Wind & Fire saxophonist Don Myrick, guitarist Paul Jackson, Jr., drummers John Robinson (Rufus), Ricky Lawson (Michael Jackson, Whitney Houston, Steely Dan), and keyboardists Greg Phillinganes, Vernon Fails, Sir Dean Gant and percussionist Paulinho Da Costa. Spending six months in the studio, recording wraps in early 1986. When the first single “Watch Your Step” (#23 R&B) receives a muted response from radio, Elektra quickly follows it up with “Sweet Love” (#2 R&B, #3 AC, #8 Pop). The ballad is a multi-format smash, giving Anita Baker her long awaited breakthrough. The albums seamless blend of R&B, jazz and pop proves irresistible, standing out dramatically in an era dominated by sterile over-produced recordings. “Rapture” cements her status with her core R&B fan base, broadening her audience. It spins off a total of five singles including “Same Ole Love (365 Days A Year)” (#8 R&B, #6 AC, #44 Pop), “No One In The World” (#5 R&B, #9 AC, #44 Pop) and the title track “Caught Up In The Rapture” (#6 R&B, #9 AC, #37 Pop). Though not released as singles, “You Bring Me Joy” and “Mystery” also become R&B airplay favorites as well. The album wins Anita Baker her first two Grammy Awards including Best Female R&B Vocal Performance (for the full album) and Best R&B Song (“Sweet Love”) in 1987. “Rapture” spends three weeks at number one (non-consecutive) on the Billboard R&B album chart, peaking at number eleven on the Top 200, and is certified 5x Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

Gotta Go My Own Way | Calum Hood

Gotta Go My Own Way (based off of HSM2)

Calum Imagine

(not my gif, found on google)

Calum slammed his bass on top of his bed, sitting down next to it and running his hands through his hair in frustration. Y/N and the other boys, Luke, Ashton and Michael, all joined it and sat in a circle, Y/N sitting next to Calum rubbing his back. She could feel the heat radiating off of him, his heart racing and tense muscles underneath her delicate touch. He and the band had been trying to get signed and noticed by companies and other bands for over 4 years now, and no one has made an effort to take them on and have faith in their ability to make it big. Calum had spent endless nights on the computer and phone, contacting every record label about an audition to be signed, and each time they turned him and his dreams down. He couldn’t take it anymore, he was ready to give up the dream of being a musician down with his best friends, at the age of 19.

“Calum, calm down, just because someone hasn’t discovered you yet, doesn’t mean no one will.” Y/N tried to comment to comfort him. Calum only huffed, as if she made some sort of joke.

“Are you kidding me? 4 years. 4 years the guys and I have been on countless auditions and using every minute on our phones to contact producers and record labels. I gave up a career in football for this. I was on my way to becoming a famous athlete, my future all laid in stone. But I gave it up for something I actually loved more than anything in this world. And I can’t even achieve it.”

“Calum calm down! You’re making it sound like you’re regretting ever starting this band!” Luke shouted as he stood up and pointed at Calum.

“Well maybe I do!” Calum stood up, chest to chest with Luke.

The room fell silent, with the exception of the slight ringing noise in the air. Y/N grabbed onto Calum’s hand and rubbed circles on his knuckles, with a look in her eyes that showed she was scared. Scared of him ever lashing out at her the way he was lashing out at Luke. She had never seen him this way, with smoke and flames practically coming out of his nose. She pleaded him to stop, while Luke sighed and marched over toward Calum’s large bedroom window to get his mind off all the stress being put on him and the band. Instead of Calum sitting back down and being rational, he stormed out the door and down the stairs into the summer air. Once he was outside, he rubbed his forehead, heat immediately radiating off of it. Then, as if on que, vibrations came from his jean pocket. He growled, not wanting to hear any voices since he was already getting a massive headache.

He ripped the phone from his pocket and angrily hit the green button to answer.

“Hello!” He yelled.

“Oh I’m sorry is this…Calum Hood?” An innocent voice fell from the lips of the girl on the other end. He instantly felt bad for shouting, and took a breath.

“Yes, sorry for shouting, but yeah this is him. Who is this?”

“Hi! I’m Nia from the band Hey Violet. We have a record label named What’s Up Records, and we’ve seen your band, 5 Seconds of Summer’s youtube videos and Hey Violet loves you guys! How would you like to meet with us about being our opening band on our upcoming tour?”

Calum nearly jumped out of his jeans, opening his mouth and gasping at the unbelievable opportunity being thrown at him at the time he needed it most. He felt the tears peaking in his waterline, and smiled so big that the crinkles in his eyes were showing, the sign of pure joy from Calum.

“Oh my god…Oh my…wow, yes yes yes we’d-we’d love to…oh my god, thank you. Thank you so so much!” She laughed on the other end.

“You’re very welcome. You guys are talented, and deserve it. Come by our studio tomorrow at 2 pm. The address is 3002 Suite Street. We’re looking forward to meeting with you guys.” And then he heard the phone noises signaling that she ended the call. Calum jumped up and down like a 5 year old girl after getting the doll she had been wanting all year, and ran inside the house trampling up the stairs.

“Guys! Guess what!”

Keep reading

saphaeldaydreams  asked:

[Prompt] Simon is a pop star and writes songs about his boyfriend Raphael, but Raphael is upset because Simon uses female pronouns and pretends he's straight in the songs

Everything I didn’t Say

“So, what did you guys think?” Simon asked and set his guitar to side. His manager Victor Aldertree studied him for another moment before delivering his comments.

“The songs good, potential hit” Simon grinned, he’d spent months writing this song for Raphael. “There’s only one problem” Victor added and Simon frowned “I know you love your boyfriend and all that but you’re our rising star, your fan base are primarily young girls, all I’m saying is, change the pronounces or find another record label to produce your music”

~~
“I have a new song, I just finished” Simon announced to the small crowd he was playing to in New York city. “I wrote it for someone very special” his eyes scanned the crowd and stop at the front row where Raphael, Isabelle, Clary, and Magnus was seated “I hope you like it”

The fans at the front row noticed the direction in which Simon, looked. Many of them began speculations, whether it was Izzy or Clary that Simon talking about. Raphael tried not to let it bother him and focused on his boyfriend as the band began to play the song.

“People say we shouldn’t be together.
We’re too young to know about forever
But I say they don’t know what they’re talk-talk-talkin about”

Simon sang and Raphael felt his heart began to beat faster. Ever since Simon got sign to Idris’ record label, their relationship had to become more private, basically none existent. And no matter how much Raphael loved and support his boyfriend, it hurt that he had to be seen as Simon’s “friend”.

He hadn’t thought about how the situation had made Simon feel, not until now.

“’Cause this love is only getting stronger.
So I don’t want to wait any longer
I just want to tell the world that you’re mine, girl.
Oh”

“Oh” Raphael repeated and blocked out the rest of the song. It was one thing to have to spend dates with your boyfriend at home, having to have one of the girls with them whenever they wanted to go out. Turning simple things they did together into group activities because of the label. It was still heart breaking to know that he’ll never publicly be Simon’s someone special.

read more

2

1988. Danzig

 is the debut album by band Danzig, released in August, 1988. The album was the first release on producer Rick Rubin’s new label Def American Recordings.  It remains the band’s best-selling album having been certified Gold in the U.S. in 1994, and his since been certified Platinum.

Glenn Danzig originally wrote the songs “Twist of Cain” and “Possession” for his previous band, Samhain.  Lyrically, “Twist of Cain” is inspired by the biblical story of Cain and Abel. Guitarist John Christ described the recording of “Twist of Cain”: “We started writing that song even before Biscuits joined the band. At first we started recording it in G, then at the last minute we decided that A was better. We kept the drum tracks as they were and re-recorded the guitars, bass and vocals. Not many people know this, but James Hetfield (of Metallica) came down and recorded some backing vocals on that track.” Hetfield also recorded backing vocals on “Possession”, however, due to contractual reasons he could not be credited in the album insert.  A backwards piano track is used during the intro to “Possession”.

John Christ has described “She Rides” as “Our first sex song…it’s such a stripped-down song, just a couple of guitar tracks and almost no bass. “She Rides” probably has the best vocal performance on the album, though. There are also some really weird background noises and moaning sounds on it.”

 "Danzig debuts with a record of simple, pounding, bluesy metal featuring lead singer Glenn Danzig’s trademark Elvis-meets-Jim Morrison bellow and outlandishly dark, evil lyrics.  

  “Danzig is a crunchy and lusty demonic cross between The Doors, Misfits and Black Sabbath. Roughly half of the album is ominous and mighty, the rest displays the weak underbelly of Rubin’s thinly homogeneous production.

Danzig Formed by and named after former The Misfits singer Glenn Danzig. After The Misfits disbanded in 1983 he fully committed himself to the band that he originally started merely as a sideproject, Samhain.  1986, Samhain performed at The Ritz in New York in what was to be their final show. In attendance was Rick Rubin, who was scouting for potential bands to sign to his record label, Def American. Rubin at first wished only to sign Danzig, with the intent of making him the vocalist for a hard rock supergroup that Rubin envisioned. However, Danzig refused to sign to Rubin’s label without Samhain’s bassist Eerie Von. In 1987, he added John Christ on guitar and Chuck Biscuits (ex-Black Flag) on drums.  To reflect the change in musical direction and avoid having to start anew after future lineup changes, Glenn, on Rubin’s advice, changed the name of Samhain to his surname, Danzig.

James Hetfield - Backing vocals on "Twist of Cain” and “Possession”  

       Glenn Danzig    Eerie Von    John Christ    Chuck Biscuits