probably will add to it

tips for writing bilingual characters
  • there are different types of bilinguals
    • the All Around: speaks, reads, and writes both languages pretty well
    • the Conversational: one language is stronger than the other; can speak the other language a lot better than they read/write it (a lot of kids of immigrants are this type)
    • the High Schooler: understands what’s being said to them in the other language, can’t really speak it
  • don’t have your characters randomly drop words from their other language mid-sentence around people who don’t speak it lol
    • languages are a mindset thing. like personally if i’m around english-speakers, i’m speaking english and i don’t really switch to my other language (which is portuguese)
    • so like if you’re writing a bilingual character who speaks spanish and have them say something like “hey chad let’s go to the biblioteca” to an english speaker i’ll probably spend 5 minutes laughing and then close your story lmao
  • exception: the character is speaking in their weaker language and forgot a word (”where are the…? uh… llaves…. keys! keys, where are they?”)
  • otherwise really the only time your character should be randomly switching languages mid-sentence is if they’re talking to another bilingual
  • like i don’t speak spanish but i’ve legit never heard a spanish speaker say “ay dios mio” to gringos lmao
  • conversations between two bilingual people can take a few different forms:
    • Pick One: they pick one language and kinda stick with it for the whole conversation (a conversation i might have with my portuguese-speaking mom: ”you okay?” “yeah, i’m good. how’re you?” “i’m fine, but your dad-”)
    • Back-and-Forth: someone says something in one language, the other person replies in the other (”tudo bem?” “yeah, i’m good. how’re you?” “tou bem, mas o seu pai-”)
    • Combo: they speak a combo of the two languages, a popular example being spanglish, though basically every bilingual has their own combo language (”tudo bem?” “sim, tou bem. how’re you?” “i’m fine, mas o seu pai-”)
  • when in doubt: just ask a bilingual to look at your stuff and tell you if anything sounds weird
5

With Howard being gone, there’s a limit to any kind of changes we were gonna make. But actually for the film, there were a number of places where we found outtake lyrics that Howard had done that were wonderful.

It was such a thrill to discover a new Howard Ashman lyric for Beauty and the Beast.

When we say “executive dysfunction”, I think it’s important to acknowledge to ourselves (and make clear to those who don’t struggle with it) that we’re talking about a basket of different struggles that we’re labeling with one name for convenience. One person’s executive dysfunction may not look like another person’s, even though the outcome (not being able to complete a task) may look similar from the outside.

Some people with executive dysfunction struggle to break down tasks into their component steps. Others struggle to connect cause and effect (’if I do this, this other thing will likely happen’), which makes daily life a confusing and sometimes terrifying black box. Still others can break down steps and parse out cause and effect, but they can’t start the first task (hello anxiety my old friend), or they get partway through and get distracted by a tangent or forget what the next step was because there were more than three (ah add i never miss you because you never leave), or they run out of energy before they can finish (tons of situations can cause this, both physical and mental). Sometimes people have a poor sense of how long it will take to do tasks, never seeming to budget enough because they don’t track time internally well. Others can only complete a task when they have sufficient adrenaline to spike their brain into focus, which usually means working in panic mode, which associates those tasks with Bad Feelings and further reinforces any anxiety the person may have.

And this isn’t just a few people. This is large-scale, across many groups struggling with different issues, from heavy metal poisoning to autism to add to chronic illness to anxiety to schizophrenia to mood disorders to traumatic brain injury, and more.

What we need, as a society, is to build better structures for supporting those with executive dysfunction, structures that acknowledge the multiple different types and causes. Because we cannot keep throwing the baby out with the bathwater here. We throw away incredible human potential that could help all of us because our society is set up to require a single skill which a large percentage of our teen and adult society doesn’t have and can’t easily develop (or they would have, trust me), or previously had by has temporarily lost due to injury or illness.

Instead of treating executive function as something that some people have developed and others haven’t, like artistic skills or a talent in maths or the ability to visualize systems or managing people, we treat it as a default that some people haven’t mastered because they’re [insert wrongheaded judgment here].

What if we treated the visual arts that way? If you can’t draw skillfully, you must be deficient in some way. How can you not draw? Anyone can draw. You start as a young child with crayons, what do you mean you can’t do this basic task?

Never mind that it’s a really complex skill by the time you’re expected to do the adult version, rather than the crayon version. Never mind that not everyone has been able to devote energy to developing that skill, and never mind that not everyone can visualize what they want to produce or has the hand-eye coordination necessary to accomplish it.

Now, I have friends who say that anyone can draw, and maybe they’re right on some level. But it’s hard to deny that it helps that drawing is optional. That you can opt out and no one thinks any less of you as a person. Executive function is treated as non-optional, and to some extent, since it’s involved in feeding and clothing and cleaning and educating oneself, it’s not entirely optional. But we make all of those tasks much harder by assuming by default that everyone can do them to an equal degree, and that no one needs or should need help.

If we built a society where it was expected that I might need timed reminders to eat, I would probably remember to do it more often. I certainly did as a child, when the adults around me were responsible for that task. Now that I’m an adult, the assumption is that I somehow magically developed a better internal barometer for hunger. Many people do. But I and many others did not. Recognizing that there are many of us who need help and treating that need as normal would go a long way toward building support into the basic fabric of our society.

But then, I guess that’s been the cry of disability advocates for decades; just assume this is a thing people need help with and build the entire structure with that assumption in mind.

when u gotta text someone but also gotta keep the hacker aesthetic 

2

list of random spirits encountered:

- a spirit haunting a lamppost on 3rd street. it asks for the umbrella of anyone passing by in exchange for a temporary alteration in reality

- a spirit haunting people with burdens on their mind. manifests as a pair of wings on their shoulders

soul magnets.

Things I Think About

- Murdoc has a doctorate.
- Murdoc can speak Spanish, German, and French.
- Murdoc built a cyborg.
- Murdoc painted a giant pile of trash bright pink.
- Murdoc built the Plastic Beach HQ building.
- Murdoc wrote all the songs on Plastic Beach.
- Murdoc sacrificed himself for his band.
- Murdoc is rotting.
- Murdoc cares so much.
- Murdoc talked a kid out of committing suicide.
- Murdoc was raped when he was nine.
- Murdoc has a lot of pain.
- Murdoc is extremely driven.
- Murdoc has a great sense of humour.
- Murdoc is not as bad as some people make him out to be.

Okay, but like, Dreamworks really likes inter-species relationships.

Just at the top of my head you got couples such as…

Melman and Gloria

Roxanne and Megamind

The freaking dragon and Donkey

Kowalwski and Eva

Fiona and Shrek (I mean she becomes an ogre too by the end of the film but still)

Barry and Vanessa. A bee, you guys. A bee.

It is never too late to be evaluated for ADHD.

If you look at lists of symptoms/checklists intended for adults and have that moment of “oh shit, that’s me,” get evaluated. 

Just because one doctor/psychologist/therapist/school counselor told you once that you don’t have ADHD because ______ doesn’t mean they were right. (Especially if you’re smart, good at school, or do well when tested–people who don’t know ADHD very well might try to tell you that you don’t have it. They could be wrong.)

Trying medication is worth it. And it’s never too late to try!

The right medication is like having glasses, but for your brain. It doesn’t cure anything, but makes it so you can function more like someone who doesn’t have ADHD/bad vision. 

Stimulant medications in particular have been in use for nearly a hundred years now. Taken as prescribed they have an excellent safety record. If they caused problems long-term we would know by now. 

Finding the right medication/dosage is not always easy. Don’t give up because you try one medication and don’t like it. Tell your provider what you did and didn’t like about it and ask to try something else. 

(That said, many side effects are temporary. Again, talk to your provider.)

If you have ADHD, the right medication can significantly ease your depression and/or anxiety. It will also make all of your current coping methods for your ADHD much, much easier. 

Okay but Clockwork functionally being a cryptid in the Ghost Zone tho

Danny tells one of his ghost friends that he knows the Master of Time and gets basically the same reaction someone would if they said mothman was their best friend

Ghosts make jokes about chugging contaminated ectoplasm and fighting Clockwork behind Walker’s prison at 3 am

There’s a group of ghosts dedicated to proving his existence with a bunch of ‘evidence’ like broken watches and blurry photos of purple-cloaked ghosts that are very obviously not Clockwork

There are conspiracy theory obsessed ghosts who have theories ranging from “Clockwork was a story created by Pariah Dark to keep everyone too paranoid to rebel” to “maybe the real Master of Time was the friends we made along the way” 

This blog is a safe space for:

•people with personality disorders
•poc
•autistic people
•intersectional feminism
•people with ptsd
•people with any mental health issues
•trans/genderfluid/agender/nonbinary
•minors
•abuse/sexual abuse (child) victims
•age regressors
•chubby/fat people
•disabled people
•LGBT+
•people with eating disorders

💗