prix st. george

Riding a Prix St George horse expectation vs reality
  • Expectation: *Gracefully does upper-level movements on lovely trained horse* *crowd applauds*
  • Reality:
  • Me: Ok lets do a little bit of counter-canter
  • Horse: LEAD CHANGE!
  • Me: Yes that's nice, but we are doing some counter-canter
  • Horse: No we're not we're doing a lead change
  • Me: I know you can do a lead change, but we're going to counter-canter right now.
  • Horse: LEAD CHANGE! ONE TWO THREE CHANGE ONE TWO THREE CHANGE!
  • Me: Ok let's stretch at the canter a bit and get back on track, then we'll try counter-canter again
  • Horse: TEMPI CHANGES! TEMPI CHANGES!
  • Me: Ok how about trot
  • Horse: collected walk amiright
instagram

So proud of Soph’s progress during her first season at Prix St. George! She’s such a smart horse and it’s so much fun to see her get stronger and more confident. ❤️💪🏼😄 #horses #dressage #westphalian #warmblood #equestrian

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Riding a Prix St George horse expectation vs reality part 2
  • <p> <b>Expectation:</b> *is able to control and balance canter, collect, extend, smooth upward and downward transitions*<p/><b>Reality:</b> <p/><b>Me:</b> ok lengthen stride in canter<p/><b>Horse:</b> ok<p/><b>Me:</b> ok not bad, next long side lets try extended canter<p/><b>Horse:</b> I forgot what your legs mean<p/><b>Me:</b> ok, e x t e n d e d caaaaanterrrrrr<p/><b>Horse:</b> *launches into an upside down hand gallop* MY SPIRIT IS FREE, I AM THE WIND AND THE SKY!<p/><b>Me:</b> fuckfuckfuckfuckfuckfuckfuck<p/></p>
youtube

(via https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uw8PeU0uitA)

Lovely, lovely, LOVELY!!

In the early years of my training in the United States, I saw even in the FEI tests only tense, crooked horses, forced into a “straightjacket”, suffering while hanging on the curb. To counteract this, I developed the Prix St. James, a dressage test in two parts:

Part 1 was an exercise at a lower level (snaffle bit, standard jacket), which included allowing the reins to be “chewed out of the hands” at the trot. Riders who didn’t achieve 60 percent in Part 1 were not allowed in Part 2, the Prix St. George. Placing was determined by the addition of of the scores from Part 1 and Part 2. The judges were impressed in that there was a distinct difference the next year. Many “leg movers” had developed into “back movers”.

—  Kurd Albrecht Von Ziegner