private-plate

Personalised Privacy

So I just went ahead and bought my second personalised number plate. Excited to see what it looks like made up on the physical plates! 

Many people couldn’t care less about having a personalised numberplate but after having my first one for 2 years I’ve become a bit of a numberplate-snob! In my eyes a number plate says just as much about you as your car does. Why go with the mundane, ordinary combination of characters that are issued to from a database of millions when you can choose your own unique combination? I can’t see how anyone doesn’t understand that appeal; but each to their own!

The plate I bought this time is slightly more obvious than the one I currently own however it’s still not as good as it could be! One day I hope to have enough money to purchase something really exclusive of say four characters or less, my name and a number would be perfect! 

Currently the numberplate ‘MAX 1’ is valued at £304,000 though so I doubt I could ever justify spending that much on what effectively is two pieces of plastic! Another one that I’d love would be 'MAX IT’ which is currently assigned to a…. Lamborghini Reventon.

Ahh.. one can dream… lol.

Anyway, hopefully the next time you see my plate on the road it will be on the back of a machine that can travel from 0-100mph quicker than you can read this sentence (or even the car above for that matter!)

In a 5-4 ruling – with the four Democratic nominees joined, interestingly, by Justice Clarence Thomas, the Court’s only African American member - the court held that Texas was not required to issue the pro-Confederate plate design. This is not an easy case, but the Court’s opinion is probably right.

Let’s not mince words: the Confederate battle flag originated as a symbol of treason in defense of slavery that was repurposed as a defense of apartheid during the massive resistance to Brown v Board of Education. It’s about hate, not heritage. Yet individuals have a First Amendment right to display one on a bumper sticker, outside their house or on a t-shirt, because racist speech is protected. The state can prevent threatening speech, but it cannot punish people merely for expressing ideas.

The dissenting justices see this case as being about this kind of individual right.

“Messages that are proposed by private parties and placed on Texas specialty plates are private speech,” asserted Justice Samuel Alito in his dissenting opinion. If this is true, the Sons of Confederate Veterans plate must be permitted despite its hateful symbolism.

The majority, however, makes a persuasive case that this is a case of government speech, not private speech. This is an important distinction, because while the state generally cannot suppress private speech or favor one private opinion over another, it is not required to endorse or express any particular view. “A person who displays a message on a Texas license plate” instead of a bumper or window sticker, argues Justice Stephen Breyer in his opinion for the Court, “likely intends to convey to the public that the State has endorsed that message.”

The Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the right of the state of Texas to reject a specialty license plate featuring a Confederate flag. The case featured an unusual alliance in which Justice Clarence Thomas, known for his rigid ideological conservatism, teamed up with the court’s four liberal justices in a 5-4 majority.

The central issue in this case was whether a message displayed on a license plate is personal speech or government speech.

A Texas board had denied a request by the state chapter of the Sons of Confederate Veterans for a license plate that displayed the group’s name, founding date, and the Confederate flag. The state of Texas argued that license plates are government speech, so the state has the right to censor it. The Sons of Confederate Veterans claimed the plates are private speech, and that the government’s decision not to approve its license plate request was discrimination based on viewpoint and a violation of its free-speech rights.

While the government can’t engage in viewpoint discrimination of private speech, “[w]hen government speaks, it is not barred by the Free Speech Clause from determining the content of what it says,” Justice Stephen Breyer’s majority opinion states.

Dealers splashed £40k on wedding

A couple who were part of a family run multi-million drugs ring blew £40,000 on their wedding while still claiming benefits.
Carl and Donna Honey-Jones were hauled before a judge along with four relatives to be sentenced for their part in flooding the streets of Swansea with cocaine.
Prosecutor Ian Wright QC said the pair lived the kind of lavish lifestyle reserved for the rich and famous - jetting off to all inclusive trips to the Maldives and even paying for a family trip to Lapland.
The couple also splashed the cash on their wedding too - tying the knot at a 14th Century Church before going to a packed reception via horse and cart.
But Swansea Crown Court heard the Honey-Jones’ frivolous spending soon stood out like a sore thumb to the authorities.
They drove around in a top-of-the-range Audi and BMW, both with private number plates, and lived in a suburban four-bedroomed home - while still in minimum wage jobs and claiming thousands in benefits.
Mr Honey-Jones, described by a judge as the “inept” head of his family run conspiracy, even got his father-in-law Brian Harding on the act - with the 58-year-old mixing cocaine with cutting agents in his garage.
Also caught out was the 31-year-old’s cousin Matthew Jones, who was stopped by police while driving an expensive Mercedes which had thousands of pounds in the boot.
And 32-year-old Mrs Honey-Jones’ brother and sister inadvertently shopped themselves after calling the police after receiving threats from gangsters.
Judge Paul Thomas said the Honey-Jones’ operation - which saw large quantities of cocaine brought from Liverpool to Swansea - was motivated by greed.
He said: “Carl Honey-Jones you were the dealer principle and in your case it financed a extravagant lifestyle of foreign holidays, a lavish wedding and luxury cars.
"The sums involved were in the seven-figures and you Carl Honey-Jones were at the very top of that conspiracy.
"Although it was was lucrative, the operation that you led was inept and amateurish.
"Top of the range cars and luxury brands in Penlan Road were bound to attract suspicion.”

The drugs network was taken apart after police raided 11 addresses in Swansea last year.
Cocaine with a potential street value of £750,000, and almost £60,000 in cash was seized along with expensive jewellery - including a genuine Rolex watch - as well as cars and quad bikes.
Detectives also found a notebook detailing drug-deals - with the amounts described in court as “eye watering”.
Receipts for the wedding of the Honey-Jones’ totalling £40,000 were discovered and various family holidays to Mexico, Dubai, Maldives and Florida also costing around £40,000.
A Christmas trip to Lapland had been booked, but never went ahead as the Honey-Joneses had been arrested.
Prosecutor Mr Wright said the pair were “living the high life” despite their limited means.
The court heard Donna was working a £6,000-a -year minimum wage job, while her husband was working on a “pay-as-you-earn” basis on a £5,000 salary.
“In that same year they went on to claim state benefit”, Mr Wright said in his opening.
The Honey-Joneses both pleaded guilty to money laundering, while Carl also confessed to conspiring to supply Class A drugs.
Harding admitted he was a “willing conspirator” in the enterprise and mixed cocaine with cough drop agent Benzocaine to make the amounts of the drug they had go further - therefore increasing the profit margin.
The court heard Harding also used a “heavy duty press” in this process so give the appearance of their product being a higher purity than it actually was.
The court heard that Carl’s “right hand man” Matthew Jones, 24, then sold the drug to other dealers further down the chain and would collect the money before handing it over to his cousin.
As police raided the Honey-Joneses house, his car was seen nearby by detectives.
And when he was later stopped by officers, he claimed that £2,700 cash in the boot of his car was just his savings before saying: “I know you just done over the Honey-Joneses”.
Meanwhile Harding’s children, Laura Harding, 31, and David Owens, 41, became involved following the raids.
Owens said he feared for his life after getting threatening phone calls from gangsters from Liverpool saying there was still cocaine outstanding that the police had not recovered.
His sister Laura then found the drugs and the items were then sent “to persons unknown”.
However the threats continued and the pair, genuinely fearing for their lives, called the police.
But detectives later found out that Owens posted on social media site Facebook that he had returned £250,000 of cocaine to its owners, adding: “I am not as dull as the rest of the family”.
Both Laura Harding and Owens pleaded guilty to perverting the course of justice.
In mitigation for Carl Honey-Jones, barrister John Hipkin said his client pleaded guilty at an the earliest opportunity, and had also spent the time spent in prison on remand productively.
Donna Honey-Jones’ barrister Catherine Richards, in mitigation for her client, insisted she was a woman who was just “taking cash from her husband and spending it”.
The barrister added that the defendant had apologised to her children for the trauma the legal proceedings had involved, and had “learned her lesson”.
Dan Hurd, in mitigation for Brian Harding, said his client admitted he was a “willing conspirator” in the family business but added his client suffered from ill health and had become involved in the enterprise to pay off debts.
John Hartson, for Jones, said his client maintained the position he had held during his trial, namely that he was not involved in conspiracy to supply cocaine.
However, Judge Paul Thomas disagreed and said Jones was Carl Honey-Jones’ “right hand man” while the circumstances surrounding Laura Harding and Owens were described as “very unusual, perhaps unique”

2003 ‘03, A160 Avantgarde Auto, Leather, only 55,000 miles, £2995


LONG M.O.T. + 12 MONTHS WARRANTY

SIMPLY STUNNING TOP OF THE RANGE AUTOMATIC A CLASS WITH WARRANTED LOW MILEAGE SUPPORTED WITH FULL SERVICE HISTORY FROM NEW (with 12, yes TWELVE Service Stamps!), EVERY M.O.T FROM NEW, LONG M.O.T. TO MAY 2016 (with No Advisories), 4 NEW TYRES, NEW BATTERY, PLUS NEW KENWOOD AUDIO & BLUETOOTH TOO! We know this car well as we sold it to the previous owner & it comes with a Private Plate (valued at £500) included in the sale. This high spec Avantgarde model also comes with Power Assisted Steering, Remote Central Locking, Electric Windows (x4), Electric/Heated Door Mirrors, Unmarked Leather Interior, Multiple Airbags, Air Con (ice cold), Cruise Control, Alloy Wheels, Electronic Stability Program (Traction Control), Alarm/Immobiliser, Driver’s Seat Height Adjuster, Kenwood Radio/CD, Polar Silver Metallic Paint + all the Original Book Pack & Manuals. A rare opportunity to acquire such an immaculate low mileage Mercedes A Class! FOR COMPLETE PEACE OF MIND, ALL OUR A CLASS CARS ARE SUPPLIED WITH:- 60 POINT HEALTH CHECK, PRE-DELIVERY INSPECTION, FULL SERVICE HISTORY, HPI CERTIFICATE, VOSA PRINTOUT, FRESH SERVICE & 12 MONTHS WARRANTY! This car is absolutely spotless inside & out & wants for nothing. Seeing is believing, so come & see for yourself - indoor viewing available 7 days a week, day or night by appointment only. PART EXCHANGE AVAILABLE. FIRST TO SEE WILL BUY AT ONLY £2995

Dealers splashed £40k on wedding

A couple who were part of a family run multi-million drugs ring blew £40,000 on their wedding while still claiming benefits.
Carl and Donna Honey-Jones were hauled before a judge along with four relatives to be sentenced for their part in flooding the streets of Swansea with cocaine.
Prosecutor Ian Wright QC said the pair lived the kind of lavish lifestyle reserved for the rich and famous - jetting off to all inclusive trips to the Maldives and even paying for a family trip to Lapland.
The couple also splashed the cash on their wedding too - tying the knot at a 14th Century Church before going to a packed reception via horse and cart.
But Swansea Crown Court heard the Honey-Jones’ frivolous spending soon stood out like a sore thumb to the authorities.
They drove around in a top-of-the-range Audi and BMW, both with private number plates, and lived in a suburban four-bedroomed home - while still in minimum wage jobs and claiming thousands in benefits.
Mr Honey-Jones, described by a judge as the “inept” head of his family run conspiracy, even got his father-in-law Brian Harding on the act - with the 58-year-old mixing cocaine with cutting agents in his garage.
Also caught out was the 31-year-old’s cousin Matthew Jones, who was stopped by police while driving an expensive Mercedes which had thousands of pounds in the boot.
And 32-year-old Mrs Honey-Jones’ brother and sister inadvertently shopped themselves after calling the police after receiving threats from gangsters.
Judge Paul Thomas said the Honey-Jones’ operation - which saw large quantities of cocaine brought from Liverpool to Swansea - was motivated by greed.
He said: “Carl Honey-Jones you were the dealer principle and in your case it financed a extravagant lifestyle of foreign holidays, a lavish wedding and luxury cars.
"The sums involved were in the seven-figures and you Carl Honey-Jones were at the very top of that conspiracy.
"Although it was was lucrative, the operation that you led was inept and amateurish.
"Top of the range cars and luxury brands in Penlan Road were bound to attract suspicion.”

The drugs network was taken apart after police raided 11 addresses in Swansea last year.
Cocaine with a potential street value of £750,000, and almost £60,000 in cash was seized along with expensive jewellery - including a genuine Rolex watch - as well as cars and quad bikes.
Detectives also found a notebook detailing drug-deals - with the amounts described in court as “eye watering”.
Receipts for the wedding of the Honey-Jones’ totalling £40,000 were discovered and various family holidays to Mexico, Dubai, Maldives and Florida also costing around £40,000.
A Christmas trip to Lapland had been booked, but never went ahead as the Honey-Joneses had been arrested.
Prosecutor Mr Wright said the pair were “living the high life” despite their limited means.
The court heard Donna was working a £6,000-a -year minimum wage job, while her husband was working on a “pay-as-you-earn” basis on a £5,000 salary.
“In that same year they went on to claim state benefit”, Mr Wright said in his opening.
The Honey-Joneses both pleaded guilty to money laundering, while Carl also confessed to conspiring to supply Class A drugs.
Harding admitted he was a “willing conspirator” in the enterprise and mixed cocaine with cough drop agent Benzocaine to make the amounts of the drug they had go further - therefore increasing the profit margin.
The court heard Harding also used a “heavy duty press” in this process so give the appearance of their product being a higher purity than it actually was.
The court heard that Carl’s “right hand man” Matthew Jones, 24, then sold the drug to other dealers further down the chain and would collect the money before handing it over to his cousin.
As police raided the Honey-Joneses house, his car was seen nearby by detectives.
And when he was later stopped by officers, he claimed that £2,700 cash in the boot of his car was just his savings before saying: “I know you just done over the Honey-Joneses”.
Meanwhile Harding’s children, Laura Harding, 31, and David Owens, 41, became involved following the raids.
Owens said he feared for his life after getting threatening phone calls from gangsters from Liverpool saying there was still cocaine outstanding that the police had not recovered.
His sister Laura then found the drugs and the items were then sent “to persons unknown”.
However the threats continued and the pair, genuinely fearing for their lives, called the police.
But detectives later found out that Owens posted on social media site Facebook that he had returned £250,000 of cocaine to its owners, adding: “I am not as dull as the rest of the family”.
Both Laura Harding and Owens pleaded guilty to perverting the course of justice.
In mitigation for Carl Honey-Jones, barrister John Hipkin said his client pleaded guilty at an the earliest opportunity, and had also spent the time spent in prison on remand productively.
Donna Honey-Jones’ barrister Catherine Richards, in mitigation for her client, insisted she was a woman who was just “taking cash from her husband and spending it”.
The barrister added that the defendant had apologised to her children for the trauma the legal proceedings had involved, and had “learned her lesson”.
Dan Hurd, in mitigation for Brian Harding, said his client admitted he was a “willing conspirator” in the family business but added his client suffered from ill health and had become involved in the enterprise to pay off debts.
John Hartson, for Jones, said his client maintained the position he had held during his trial, namely that he was not involved in conspiracy to supply cocaine.
However, Judge Paul Thomas disagreed and said Jones was Carl Honey-Jones’ “right hand man” while the circumstances surrounding Laura Harding and Owens were described as “very unusual, perhaps unique”