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On this day in music history: February 17, 1983 - Music superstar Michael Jackson appears on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine. The article titled “Michael Jackson: Life In The Magical Kingdom”, features an in depth interview with the very media shy pop superstar by journalist Gerri Hirshey conducted over the course of several days in the Fall of 1982. In the interview, Jackson talks about his past as a child star and about the current projects he is working on at the time which include the blockbuster album “Thriller” and the “E.T. Storybook Album”. The article reveals a not often seen side of the usually guarded Jackson, revealing himself to be sensitive and playful, but also very business savvy and highly ambitious. The cover photo taken by photographer Bonnie Schiffman is the first time Michael Jackson is featured on the cover of Rolling Stone since 1971, when The Jackson 5 are at the height of their success. The interview is the last major in print interview that Jackson grants during his career. The article is reprinted in the Rolling Stone anthology book “20 Years Of Rolling Stone: What A Long, Strange Trip It’s Been” in 1987, and in the Michael Jackson memorial commemorative issue that Rolling Stone publishes in July of 2009.

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It’s FRIDAY FASHION FACT! One of the biggest “hot topics” of today is the unrealistic beauty standards for women. We are constantly surrounded by Photoshopped images and celebrities who spend a vast amount of time and money sculpting their bodies to “perfection.” Though the discussion is at the forefront now, the topic is nothing new. One of the most iconic instances of these near-impossible beauty ideals is the infamous turn of the 20th Century Gibson Girl.

The Gibson Girl is named for her creator, artist Charles Dana Gibson. In the 1890s, Gibson worked for LIFE magazine, where his girl first appeared. As she gained popularity, his work was soon printed in all the major magazines. There is speculation that the girl was modeled after his wife or his sister, but according to Gibson, she was not one girl, she was every girl, and that’s what made her beautiful. He saw her as the embodiment of the American melting pot- she was a combination of countless nationalities and races (of course, in this era, that still meant a very pale caucasian). In a way, the Gibson Girl was the first “All-American Girl.”

Gibson believed that the more races were mixed together, the more beautiful women would become, as he predicted only the best features from each would be passed down. He theorized that as a result, women of the future would be far more beautiful than the women of his day. In his drawings, Gibson combined what he saw as the best features: delicate facial features, soft hair in the latest bouffant style (but still with natural wisps and tendrils falling gracefully aside) a full chest and hips paired with a slender waist, positioned into the highly corseted S-bend. She was perfect, but not absurdly so, in a way that felt almost attainable.She wore the latest fashions, but was not at the level of the royals whom Europeans often turned to for beauty standards.

If her so-close-yet-so-far looks were not enough to attract admiration, Gibson gave her a personality to match. She was active and independent, playing sports, going off to work, not desperate for the help of a man. She was playfully teasing towards men, for how could they possibly hold the interest of such a woman? She did get swept up in romance, though, becoming a wife and mother. She was not content keeping house, though, and continued to spend her days with women as equally tenacious as she. Yet she was not political or controversial, steering clear of the rising suffragette movement, or stating any strong opinions of women’s rights. She was the perfect blend of modern and traditional.

The Gibson Girl was the perfect embodiment of “Women want to be her, men want to be with her.” It is due to this mass appeal that so many women strove to physically emulate the Gibson Girl. After all, who wouldn’t want to be the girl that so many people adored and admired? Of course, creating the look in real life was not nearly as simple as it appeared. The S-bend corset became extremely popular, yet this corset style forced the body into arguably the most unnatural shape of any other corset throughout history. Reality meant that it was near impossible for women to adopt the relaxed and care-free attitude of the Gibson Girl.

There were a few actress and celebrities who came close to the ideal, several of whom actually served as models for Charles Gibson, most notably Camille Clifford, whose near-perfect hourglass figure was the drawings come to life. Of course, this only enhanced the idea that the look was attainable for the average woman. Just like every beauty ideal, though, the Gibson Girl look eventually fell from favor. By the 1910s, society was shifting. The women’s rights movement was gaining momentum, catapulted by women joining the workforce en masse. The Gibson Girl was soon viewed as too proper, uptight, and locked in tradition. However, to this day the image remains the icon of the Edwardian age.

Have a question about fashion history that you want answered in the next FRIDAY FASHION FACT? Just click the ASK button at the top of the page!

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Instead of dwelling on the negatives of zine making (namely, huge delays in shipping because of major printing error and slow turnaround), I’m focusing on the positives and giving everyone a preview of the bundle keychain! Your zines should all ship in a little over a week, if everything goes right. We love you.


Happy New Year!! May 2017 be good to all of us 💗💗💗

✨ Hopefully you all keep up with us on Twitter, because we have tons of fun over there! Polls, previews, and other fun stuff. www.Twitter.com/voltronzine

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so i’m back from minncon!! or rather ROB PLS LET ME LIVE…CON

so to start out, i’ll explain this con’s comic a little better! after the SNS, i stayed around for quite a while talking and meeting up with friends i haven’t seen in a long time! it was really great, until security kicked us out at about 1AM. i lamented and realized i had no one to walk back with, but the trek was only about a block away, so i figured “eyyy, what could happen in that time”

…and then about 2/3 of the way there, i thought i was being abducted by the government because of a GIGANTIC shiny black SUV that was approaching me. TURNS OUT it wasn’t the gov’t, swain was actually headed back at the same time i was! i was spotted and shouted at, and bid farewell by the band. SO I LIVED! and i told them they scared the shit outta me the following afternoon bc i thought The Man was after me and billy said i deserved to have nice things shouted at me from strange vehicles. i then died

ALSO, I DID AS I PROMISED. i got rob’s auto, brought him god’n’gabe 3, and told him in exchange i wanted to know if it was cool to get a Robert Patrick Benedict original piece. a stick rob. HE WAS SO EXCITED, THOROUGHLY AGREED, AND ONE-UPPED ME BY MAKING IT MORE THAN A STICK MAN. he also walked me through his process, said it was all in the way he adds his beard, and told me if i needed any art lessons to give him a call. i told him i was honored 

AND SPEAKING OF AWFUL THINGS, i’d heard the photographer good mr. schmelke needed to talk to me, and it was literally just to shut me down in compliment form. he insisted we take a selfie, and we proceeded to make fun of my shitty phone. and i got a swain op with @truebluecas THAT WAS A MESS. a mess. we wanted to do the End of Song Rock Jump ™ but strob couldn’t nail the jump timing. we decided on a jump on silent 3, did 3 takes, got a workout, and 3 hilarious photo prints out of it. my face, you guys. it says it all

so in as short as possible, the rest of the con was great. i asked bri about the cat that sharted on her, and got the 1st q of the koc panel! turns out a composer from spn is helping on the OST for the show YEA!! i livetweeted stephen norton messing around during the entirety of J3′s panels, but i spent about 85% of my time vending. which, btw, EVERY SINGLE BOOK SOLD OUT. so that’s incredible. and it was so great to see so many of you in person. seriously. thank you for everything.

road tripping with @neven-ebrez and @benny-la-phat was a BLAST (despite my incredibly telling and embarrassing sunburn + 3 near-death experiences i was surprisingly calm during) and i roomed with all sorts of fantastic people i’m happy to call friends now. they found out i REALLY love cake.

SORRY THIS WAS SO LONG-WINDED, but honestly, to everyone that stopped by and visited me, bought things, gave me freakin’ hAND-MADE GIFTS, OR just wanted a hug–thank you. you made this con, per usual. i hadn’t been feeling so hot lately, but i can’t deny it, none of you picked me up from it. no, you THREW me from it. i am eternally grateful!!

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Junky is finally sent off to the printer! Art and illustrations by Guillaume Singelin. It’s the first book to be released as a reward from our kickstarter campaign. It’s been so much fun to go through heaps of illustrations from Guillaume and to make somewhat of a selection (though to be honest I’ve just tried to cram as much of it as possible into the book) from almost four years worth of pictures.
It’s 220 pages long with a 32 page full color section. A conversation with Guillaume all through the book where we talk about the pictures and concepts and ideas behind it all. We’ve also tried to keep the illustrations as close to the original images as possible and have print the majority of the book in two colors, one red layer that is the original red pencil sketches, and the final inks in the second layer. Again, we’re really happy to have this book out so soon!

It will be sent out to all backers as soon as it arrives from the printers and shortly after it will be available through the webshop.
<3 Olle & Peow

Oh Hey! We’re gonna be in france this week! At Angouleme! See you there! Valentin Seiche will be there too with us and hopefully we can get him to sign some copies of THE WORLD haha! 

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On this day in music history: February 17, 1983 - Music superstar Michael Jackson appears on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine. The article titled “Michael Jackson: Life In The Magical Kingdom”, features an in depth interview with the very media shy pop superstar by journalist Gerri Hirshey conducted over the course of several days in the Fall of 1982. In the interview, Jackson talks about his past as a child star and about the current projects he is working on at the time which include the blockbuster album “Thriller” and the “E.T. Storybook Album”. The article reveals a not often seen side of the usually guarded Jackson, revealing himself to be sensitive and playful, but also very business savvy and highly ambitious. The cover photo taken by photographer Bonnie Schiffman is the first time Michael Jackson is featured on the cover of Rolling Stone since 1971, when The Jackson 5 are at the height of their success. The interview is the last major in print interview that Jackson grants during his career. The article is reprinted in the Rolling Stone anthology book “20 Years Of Rolling Stone: What A Long, Strange Trip It’s Been” in 1987, and in the Michael Jackson memorial commemorative issue that Rolling Stone publishes in July of 2009.

signs as stupid inventions for fashion

aries: socks and sandals
taurus: toe socks
gemini: FAKE POCKETS
cancer: crocs
leo: pants with fake folds like wtf???
virgo: neon/highlighter clothes
libra: harem pants
scorpio: (soccer) mom jeans
sagittarius: ORANGE TANS
capricorn: self deprecating shirts
aquarius: everything 2000
pisces: sparkly shirts/pants