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Cartography of the Cosmos

There are hundreds of billions of stars in our own Milky Way galaxy. Estimates indicate a similar number of galaxies in the observable universe, each with its own large assemblage of stars, many with their own planetary systems. Beyond and between these stars and galaxies are all manner of matter in various phases, such as gas and dust. Another form of matter, dark matter, exists in a very different and mysterious form, announcing its presence indirectly only through its gravitational effects.

This is the universe Salman Habib is trying to reconstruct, structure by structure, using precise observations from telescope surveys combined with next-generation data analysis and simulation techniques currently being primed for exascale computing.

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soooooooo…

i have been thinking a lot lately about lizert costume design. because all the important leader types of the three important tribes (sadu, temulun, cirina, and magnai) do diverge some from their people’s three-primary-color-coded uniform. sadu is just wearing shorter shorts and different sandals, temulun and cirina wear the same robe as the rest of the mol, just dyed white and pink (respectively) rather than red… but then there’s magnai. the most radiant brother magnai, The Sun, azim’s chosen, ruling over a people who revere the sun and consider themselves the descendants of him and dress the part, is walking around himself all in dark, drab, colorless blacks and greys. and i’m sure part of the reason is to do with needing magnai to seem intimidating and impressive to the players, as the standard oroniri get up is …very much not that, but it certainly would have been possible to preserve the uh. sunny qualities while making him scarier. and yet, no! the only sunny yellow and golden things about magnai’s character design are his eyes, the highlights in his (very dark) hair, and the glowing gold cracks in his axe, and when one has a sun-themed character who is mostly dark and colorless except for little golden bits, what kinda–

Originally posted by tierramarga

happy eclipse day :D

Rabbot Reviews: Night in the Woods

Painfully relatable, wonderfully colorful, delightfully charming, and exasperatingly existential.

Imagine a much tamer BoJack Horseman, with a colorful flourish and sense of nostalgia reminiscent of Hotline Miami, mixed with the millennial Scooby-Doo gang vibe of Oxenfree. Also imagine if Life is Strange felt less artificial with its blatant farce of an attempt at understanding hip kid lingo, and that Firewatch actually bothered going somewhere with its thriller esque setup and plot hooks.

That’s a jumbled mess of words, but also a perfect descriptor for the subject of this review: Night in the Woods.

Night in the Woods stars the unassuming Mae Borrowski, a 20 year old college dropout who has returned to her podunk, middle-of-nowhere, boring town, where nothing good ever happened to anybody, least of all Mae.

Upon return, she’s met with passive-aggression spiced concern from parents who honestly just want to know what their only child is going through, and friends who all either already have or are in the process of growing up and moving on in life. Thus, her return meant to ease her back into the comforts of nostalgia and something resembling normalcy only seem to cause her more anxiety and strife.

Also the crushingly slow and depressing realization that life has no meaning and nothing we do in the universe actually matters. But hey, one thing at a time, right guys?

Last call for a (mild) spoiler warning.

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REPOST, DON’T REBLOG.

NAME  Nura Rikuo
NICKNAME  Third, Master, Nura, brat [can’t really think of anything]
AGE  13
SPECIES  ¼ yokai, ¾ human

PERSONAL

MORALITY  lawful / neutral / chaotic  |  good / neutral / evil
RELIGIOUS BELIEF  agnostic  / shrine visits, but doesn’t really hold any specific belief.
SINS  greed / gluttony / sloth / lust / pride / envy / wrath
VIRTUES  chastity / charity / diligence / humility / kindness / patience / justice
PRIMARY GOALS IN LIFE  to maintain the balance between the human and yokai world without losing his clan’s primary code, no yokai must yield to another’s fear.
LANGUAGES KNOWN  Japanese, English
SECRETS that he’s the grandson of Nurarihyon and the current leader of the Nura Clan. Even if he were to declare that not many would believe him since he’s so ‘small’ and ‘young’, not to mention that his human guise make his opponents and other spectators think he’s weak when in reality the truth is another.
SAVVIES  good parties and even better quality sake, he enjoy spending time with his family and friends from both worlds and when his friends found out who and what he was not to mention were very accepting of him he was delighted. he felt bad for having to lie to them all this time but they understood his motive, not to mention he told them the truth years back but once again no one believed him, until now.

PHYSICAL

BUILD scrawny / bony / slender / fit / athletic / curvy / herculean / bulky / pudgy  / average
HEIGHT Human: 148 cm || Yōkai: 175 cm
WEIGHT  Human: 48 kg || Yōkai: 66 kg
SCARS/BIRTHMARKS  none that he’s awake of besides the scar he got when fighting against Gyuuki for the first time and the ‘tattoo-like’ marks he has from when he performs ‘Matoi’. Though he’s very careful with showing them in school, he would get in big trouble if others outside his circle knew of them
ABILITIES/POWERS  super strength, speed, ability to use his fear, manipulating his surroundings, high resistance to attacks, spiritual powers don’t damage him as much as it would if he were a full yokai, smooth talker when he want to be [xD]
RESTRICTIONS  in the human world he’s still a child to he abides by the laws and let’s his mother and grandfather take care of human matters though all information is given to him 

FAVOURITES

FAVOURITE FOOD  mother’s home-cooked meals and sweets 
FAVOURITE DRINK  sake and tea
FAVOURITE PIZZA TOPPING  meat, he’s a meat person
FAVOURITE COLOUR  red, blue, green, gold, pink 
FAVOURITE MUSIC GENRE  doesn’t have a favorite as long as it’s ‘good’
FAVOURITE BOOK GENRE  mystery, psychological, supernatural, horror, history
FAVOURITE MOVIE GENRE  not picky
FAVOURITE SEASON  winter, spring
FAVOURITE CURSE WORD  fuck, bastard [though he’s careful of not saying anything bad in front of his mother]
FAVOURITE SCENT(S)  sweet scents tbh?? like vanilla, cinnamon, jasmine… that kinda stuff!!

FUN STUFF

BOTTOM OR TOP  —
SINGS IN THE SHOWER  no
LIKES BAD PUNS  sometimes

TAGGED BY . @bloodypyre thank you <3
TAGGING . @first-division-captain-souji  @rcgnata  @lucian-silvestris  @divimortis  @noahwisdom

anonymous asked:

i'm really scared. i've seen lots of posts about people getting their blogs hacked.

Yeah, I’ve been seeing a number of posts talking about that. But stay calm! Here’s a few precautions you can take to minimize the risk.

  1. Hide your personal information. Much of the time, malicious individuals don’t use a program to gain access to your account, they use social engineering. When you sign up for an email or blog account, usually you’re asked to provide information like your name, birthday, age, zip code, primary email account, etc. This is info that can be used to reset the password or gain access to your accounts. Hide this stuff. For example, I have a separate email devoted just to my social media accounts. I don’t share it with people, it’s simply for signing up for things.
  2. Use 2-Factor authentication. Many sites (Tumblr included) lets you add an extra layer of security to the login process. If you log in to Tumblr with 2-Factor authentication enabled, it texts a numeric code to your cell phone, and you cannot log in without entering that code. This way, would-be hackers have a harder time of accessing your account. To enable, go to Settings > Account > Security (Two-Factor Authentication). It also lets you generate an app-specific password for mobile users.
  3. Beware of suspicious links and emails. If you see an outgoing link that you don’t recognize or an email telling you to click on something, it’s better to just ignore it. There’s lots of phishing schemes and viruses out there, and you can avoid them by just being cautious. I saw a thing called Tumblrcloud a few months back that said it would analyze your blog and generate a cloud of your most used phrases and blog stats. This turned out to be just a ploy, since it led to a non-Tumblr website that asked for your login info. If you see a login screen, always double check the URL before doing anything. If it’s Tumblr, then it’s safe to type. If it’s some other website, then leave that page ASAP.
  4. Use a complicated password. This is a list of 25 of the most common passwords. If your password is something simple and easy to guess, then it’s easier for someone else to gain access to your account. Use a mix of letters and numbers.

There’s a number of things I probably missed, but following these tips won’t steer you wrong. I hope it helps!

Can I get Time off to Vote?

Alabama

Ala. Code § 17-1-5

Time off work for voting: Necessary time up to one hour. The employer may decide when hours may be taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has 2 nonwork hours before polls open or one nonwork hour after polls are open.

Time off is paid: No.

Employee must request leave in advance: “Reasonable notice.”

Alaska

Alaska Stat. § 15.56.100

Time off work for voting: Not specified.

Time off not required if: Employee has 2 consecutive nonwork hours at beginning or end of shift when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Arizona

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-402

Time off work for voting: As much time as will add up to 3 hours when combined with nonwork time. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has 3 consecutive nonwork hours at beginning or end of shift when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee must request leave in advance: Prior to the day of the election.

Arkansas

Ark. Code Ann. § 7-1-102

Time off work for voting: Employer must schedule employees’ work schedules on election days to enable employees to vote.

Time off is paid: No.

California

Cal. Elec. Code § 14000

Time off work for voting: Up to 2 hours at beginning or end of shift, whichever gives employee most time to vote and takes least time off work.

Time off not required if: Employee has sufficient time to vote during nonwork time.

Time off is paid: Yes (up to 2 hours).

Employee must request leave in advance: 2 working days before election.

Colorado

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-102

Time off work for voting: Up to 2 hours. Employer may decide when hours are taken, but employer must permit employee to take time at beginning or end of shift, if employee requests it.

Time off not required if: Employee has 3 nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes (up to 2 hours).

Employee must request leave in advance: Prior to election day.

Georgia

Ga. Code Ann. § 21-2-404

Time off work for voting: Up to 2 hours. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has 2 nonwork hours at beginning or end of shift when polls are open.

Time off is paid: No.

Employee must request leave in advance: “Reasonable notice.”

Hawaii

Haw. Rev. Stat. § 11-95

Time off work for voting: 2 consecutive hours excluding meal or rest breaks. Employer may not change employee’s regular work schedule.

Time off not required if: Employee has 2 consecutive nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee required to show proof of voting: Only if employer is verifying whether employee voted when they took time off to vote. A voter’s receipt is proof of voting by the employee. If employer verifies that employee did not vote, hours off may be deducted from pay.

Illinois

10 Ill. Comp. Stat. §§ 5/7-42, 5/17-15

Time off work for voting: 2 hours. Employer may decide when hours are taken except that employer must permit a 2-hour absence during working hours if employee’s working hours begin less than 2 hours after opening of polls and end less than 2 hours before closing of polls.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee must request leave in advance: Prior to the day of election. One day in advance (for general or state election). Employer must give consent (for primary).

Iowa

Iowa Code § 49.109

Time off work for voting: As much time as will add up to 3 hours when combined with nonwork time. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has 3 consecutive nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee must request leave in advance: In writing “prior to the date of the election.”

Kansas

Kan. Stat. Ann. § 25-418

Time off work for voting: Up to 2 hours or as much time as will add up to 2 hours when combined with nonwork time. Employer may decide when hours are taken, but it may not be during a regular meal break.

Time off not required if: Employee has 2 consecutive nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Kentucky

Ky. Const. § 148; Ky. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 118.035

Time off work for voting: “Reasonable time,” but not less than 4 hours. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off is paid: No.

Employee must request leave in advance: One day before election.

Employee required to show proof of voting: No proof specified, but employee who takes time off and does not vote may be subject to disciplinary action.

Maryland

Md. Code Ann. [Elec. Law] § 10-315

Time off work for voting: 2 hours.

Time off not required if: Employee has 2 consecutive nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee required to show proof of voting: Yes; also includes attempting to vote. Must use state board of elections form.

Massachusetts

Mass. Gen. Laws ch. 149, § 178

Time off work for voting: First 2 hours that polls are open. (Applies to workers in manufacturing, mechanical, or retail industries.)

Time off is paid: No.

Employee must request leave in advance: Must apply for leave of absence (no time specified).

Minnesota

Minn. Stat. Ann. § 204C.04

Time off work for voting: May be absent for the time necessary to appear at the employee’s polling place, cast a ballot, and return to work.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Missouri

Mo. Rev. Stat. § 115.639

Time off work for voting: 3 hours. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has 3 consecutive nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes (if employee votes).

Employee must request leave in advance: “Prior to the day of election.”

Employee required to show proof of voting: None specified, but pay contingent on employee actually voting.

Nebraska

Neb. Rev. Stat. § 32-922

Time off work for voting: As much time as will add up to 2 consecutive hours when combined with nonwork time. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has 2 consecutive nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee must request leave in advance: Prior to or on election day.

Nevada

Nev. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 293.463

Time off work for voting: If it is impracticable to vote before or after work: Employee who works 2 miles or less from polling place may take 1 hour; 2 to 10 miles, 2 hours; more than 10 miles, 3 hours. Employer will decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has sufficient nonwork time when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee must request leave in advance: Prior to election day.

New Mexico

N.M. Stat. Ann. § 1-12-42

Time off work for voting: 2 hours. (Includes Indian nation, tribal, and pueblo elections.) Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee’s workday begins more than 2 hours after polls open or ends more than 3 hours before polls close.

Time off is paid: Yes.

New York

N.Y. Elec. Law § 3-110

Time off work for voting: As many hours at beginning or end of shift as will give employee enough time to vote when combined with nonwork time. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has 4 consecutive nonwork hours at beginning or end of shift when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes (up to 2 hours).

Employee must request leave in advance: Not more than 10 or less than 2 working days before election.

North Dakota

N.D. Cent. Code § 16.1-01-02.1

Time off work for voting: Employers are encouraged to give employees time off to vote when regular work schedule conflicts with times polls are open.

Time off is paid: No.

Ohio

Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 3599.06

Time off work for voting: “Reasonable time.”

Time off is paid: Yes.

Oklahoma

Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 26, § 7-101

Time off work for voting: 2 hours, unless employee lives so far from polling place that more time is needed. Employer may decide when hours are taken or may change employee’s schedule to give employee nonwork time to vote.

Time off not required if: Employee’s workday begins at least 3 hours after polls open or ends at least 3 hours before polls close.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee must request leave in advance: One day before election.

Employee required to show proof of voting: Yes.

South Dakota

S.D. Codified Laws Ann. § 12-3-5

Time off work for voting: 2 consecutive hours. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has 2 consecutive nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Tennessee

Tenn. Code Ann. § 2-1-106

Time off work for voting: “Reasonable time” up to 3 hours during the time polls are open. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee’s workday begins at least 3 hours after polls open or ends at least 3 hours before polls close.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee must request leave in advance: Before noon on the day before the election.

Texas

Tex. Elec. Code Ann. § 276.004

Time off work for voting: Employer may not refuse to allow employee to take time off to vote, but no time limit specified.

Time off not required if: Employee has 2 consecutive nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Utah

Utah Code Ann. § 20A-3-103

Time off work for voting: 2 hours at beginning or end of shift. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has at least 3 nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee must request leave in advance: “Before election day.”

West Virginia

W.Va. Code § 3-1-42

Time off work for voting: Up to 3 hours. (Employers in health, transportation, communication, production, and processing facilities may change employee’s schedule so that time off doesn’t impair essential operations but must allow employee sufficient and convenient time to vote.)

Time off not required if: Employee has at least 3 nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes (if employee votes).

Employee must request leave in advance: Written request at least 3 days before election.

Employee required to show proof of voting: None specified, but time off will be deducted from pay if employee does not vote.

Wisconsin

Wis. Stat. Ann. § 6.76

Time off work for voting: Up to 3 consecutive hours. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off is paid: No.

Employee must request leave in advance: “Before election day.”

Wyoming

Wyo. Stat. § 22-2-111

Time off work for voting: One hour, other than a meal break. Employer may decide when the hour is taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has at least 3 consecutive nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes (if employee votes).

Employee required to show proof of voting: None specified, but pay contingent on employee voting.

Learn How to Vote here

Review Deck 2 - Subsection B: Meta Incident Log

Though much research done by Director Leonard Church was unconscionable, let the record stand that the root basis of his AI implantation program held merit were it not for the grave abuses committed against the AI and personnel under his charge. He took no precautions and ignored basic signs of neurological contamination between the test subjects and their AI counterparts.

As noted in Section 24 of the review deck, the primary subject, code name ‘Maine’ was outfitted with a modded Type-2 neural lattice and assigned AI fragment Sigma. The AI showed outset ability to both understand and translate the subject’s internal thoughts and desires, a symptom that research now recognizes as a Type 4 neural bleed. Subject and AI were already losing cognizant autonomy. The Director’s logs show that both he and those researchers under him attributed this ability as positive. 

Subjects York and North Dakota were beginning to exhibit Type 4 bleed by the end of the Program’s operational time line, though not to the extent of Subject Maine who, it is believed, was engaging in conscious neural sync with his assigned AI. Subject and AI succumbed rapidly to cross-platform contamination and began exhibiting behavioral signs of conscious singularity – shared objectives, thoughts, goals. This neurological degradation went undocumented by the Director’s research team because, if logs are to be believed, they simply allowed the Sigma AI to translate everything subject 'Maine’ was saying. 

By this point, it is fair to conclude Subject 'Maine’ and AI 'Sigma’ were no longer separate entities. Further notes to follow.