primary code

lyndzileigh  asked:

I like to imagine Google having a user who likes to cook, but he gets really irritated with always having to help with conversions and stuff. "How much flour do I need?" "Two cups of Baking flour." "How many ounces is that?" "Two cups, in ounces is-" "Wait? Baking flour, can I just use All Purpose flour?" "The recipe-""What happens if I use All Purpose flour instead." Google short circuits due to irritation. 😂

//YOU ARE GIVING ME LIFE

Imagine they don’t have any appliances.

“Hey, can that arm of yours transform into like… a mixer? Yknow, instead of a pointy sword?”

“N-o, it cannot–”

“Fuck okay, maybe we can just… stab these eggs into the batter…”

Codes: Nursing Your Way Through Fear

1. Practice setting up the equipment for intubation (so it’s ready when the MD comes in and holds out their hand for the tube). Practice with the ETT, attached to a 10cc syringe, guidewire, lubricant, suction setup, yankaeur - when a code happens, have an extra one ready, an alternate size. Practice it over until you feel as though you are able to accomplish this setup quickly. 

2. Familiarize yourself with the contents of the crash carts, a closer look rather than the rush they give you during orientation. Ask Nursing Education if you can spend some time examining, and locating what’s in each draw, not just by reading the outside list.  A lot of time is wasted in codes looking for items.

3. Ask about regular ‘Mock Codes’ on your unit as practice. They may seem annoying, and take you away from your assignment, but so worth it for build up of confidence. Swap between observer and active RN. Do a post-code “wrap-up”  to give each other constructive criticism (no administrators present)

4. Take an Advanced Cardiac Life Support  class, even if it’s not a requirement. Consider recertification at alternate venues, not just your institution, for a different perspective. Particularly EMS ones - they have some great survival tips, as opposed to standardized hospital care. 

5. Observe a code in progress, (if you’re allowed to on another unit) without participating. Notice if people are all crowded around the crash cart, extraneous people in the room, the team leader’s instructions, noticed the roles of the RN’s; code recorder, medication RN, and primary RN. Oftentimes the code recorder and medication RN function as one unit, and there are additional nurses as runners or at bedside doing compressions. Notice the dialogue. Is everyone speaking over one another? Are there suggestions of interventions and corrections? The nurse is a powerful advocate and many would argue that it’s really the nurses who are running the codes. 

6. Familiarize yourself with the defibrillator, and attachments. Ensure also you know what to do if a patient needs to be paced.

7. Always have a Liter (and backup) of Normal Saline fluid primed for intubation. Blood pressure tanks here frequently (if they even have a BP) Also, many nurses would already have Dopamine/Vasopressors primed and ready to go. 

8. Handle all the common meds given - practice attaching the cartojets quickly - eg, epinephrine. Time is wasted trying to open boxes when they can be easily flipped open on one side. Have extras of these ready too. 

9. Remind team to inform family, sometimes this is forgotten during the chaos, and there’s usually enough residents in the room for one to exit and call them to ask for what their wishes are. 

10. This may seem obvious, but always know your patient’s code status - don’t rely on report, sometimes this is mis-communicated.

10.25. Remember chest x-ray (post intubation, NGT placement, central line placement) Labs, ABG, EKG, and RESTOCK CRASH CART IMMEDIATELY. (ensure you have the sister unit’s one close by) Patient’s tend to crash very soon thereafter a code, it’s a good idea to keep the defibrillator attached. 

10.50. Always ask for help. Codes are no place to keep quiet if you don’t know what you’re doing. If you’re not sure, speak up. Remember everyone is probably just as nervous as you are, regardless of how many codes they’ve experienced. Each one is different, and sometimes when it’s your own patient it feels like your first all over again. Also, never be afraid to suggest something if you’re new -  It might be something no one else thought of. Codes are team work,and the thing you may remember may be something someone else forgets, and vice versa. 

anonymous asked:

i'm really scared. i've seen lots of posts about people getting their blogs hacked.

Yeah, I’ve been seeing a number of posts talking about that. But stay calm! Here’s a few precautions you can take to minimize the risk.

  1. Hide your personal information. Much of the time, malicious individuals don’t use a program to gain access to your account, they use social engineering. When you sign up for an email or blog account, usually you’re asked to provide information like your name, birthday, age, zip code, primary email account, etc. This is info that can be used to reset the password or gain access to your accounts. Hide this stuff. For example, I have a separate email devoted just to my social media accounts. I don’t share it with people, it’s simply for signing up for things.
  2. Use 2-Factor authentication. Many sites (Tumblr included) lets you add an extra layer of security to the login process. If you log in to Tumblr with 2-Factor authentication enabled, it texts a numeric code to your cell phone, and you cannot log in without entering that code. This way, would-be hackers have a harder time of accessing your account. To enable, go to Settings > Account > Security (Two-Factor Authentication). It also lets you generate an app-specific password for mobile users.
  3. Beware of suspicious links and emails. If you see an outgoing link that you don’t recognize or an email telling you to click on something, it’s better to just ignore it. There’s lots of phishing schemes and viruses out there, and you can avoid them by just being cautious. I saw a thing called Tumblrcloud a few months back that said it would analyze your blog and generate a cloud of your most used phrases and blog stats. This turned out to be just a ploy, since it led to a non-Tumblr website that asked for your login info. If you see a login screen, always double check the URL before doing anything. If it’s Tumblr, then it’s safe to type. If it’s some other website, then leave that page ASAP.
  4. Use a complicated password. This is a list of 25 of the most common passwords. If your password is something simple and easy to guess, then it’s easier for someone else to gain access to your account. Use a mix of letters and numbers.

There’s a number of things I probably missed, but following these tips won’t steer you wrong. I hope it helps!

Can I get Time off to Vote?

Alabama

Ala. Code § 17-1-5

Time off work for voting: Necessary time up to one hour. The employer may decide when hours may be taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has 2 nonwork hours before polls open or one nonwork hour after polls are open.

Time off is paid: No.

Employee must request leave in advance: “Reasonable notice.”

Alaska

Alaska Stat. § 15.56.100

Time off work for voting: Not specified.

Time off not required if: Employee has 2 consecutive nonwork hours at beginning or end of shift when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Arizona

Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-402

Time off work for voting: As much time as will add up to 3 hours when combined with nonwork time. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has 3 consecutive nonwork hours at beginning or end of shift when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee must request leave in advance: Prior to the day of the election.

Arkansas

Ark. Code Ann. § 7-1-102

Time off work for voting: Employer must schedule employees’ work schedules on election days to enable employees to vote.

Time off is paid: No.

California

Cal. Elec. Code § 14000

Time off work for voting: Up to 2 hours at beginning or end of shift, whichever gives employee most time to vote and takes least time off work.

Time off not required if: Employee has sufficient time to vote during nonwork time.

Time off is paid: Yes (up to 2 hours).

Employee must request leave in advance: 2 working days before election.

Colorado

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1-7-102

Time off work for voting: Up to 2 hours. Employer may decide when hours are taken, but employer must permit employee to take time at beginning or end of shift, if employee requests it.

Time off not required if: Employee has 3 nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes (up to 2 hours).

Employee must request leave in advance: Prior to election day.

Georgia

Ga. Code Ann. § 21-2-404

Time off work for voting: Up to 2 hours. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has 2 nonwork hours at beginning or end of shift when polls are open.

Time off is paid: No.

Employee must request leave in advance: “Reasonable notice.”

Hawaii

Haw. Rev. Stat. § 11-95

Time off work for voting: 2 consecutive hours excluding meal or rest breaks. Employer may not change employee’s regular work schedule.

Time off not required if: Employee has 2 consecutive nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee required to show proof of voting: Only if employer is verifying whether employee voted when they took time off to vote. A voter’s receipt is proof of voting by the employee. If employer verifies that employee did not vote, hours off may be deducted from pay.

Illinois

10 Ill. Comp. Stat. §§ 5/7-42, 5/17-15

Time off work for voting: 2 hours. Employer may decide when hours are taken except that employer must permit a 2-hour absence during working hours if employee’s working hours begin less than 2 hours after opening of polls and end less than 2 hours before closing of polls.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee must request leave in advance: Prior to the day of election. One day in advance (for general or state election). Employer must give consent (for primary).

Iowa

Iowa Code § 49.109

Time off work for voting: As much time as will add up to 3 hours when combined with nonwork time. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has 3 consecutive nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee must request leave in advance: In writing “prior to the date of the election.”

Kansas

Kan. Stat. Ann. § 25-418

Time off work for voting: Up to 2 hours or as much time as will add up to 2 hours when combined with nonwork time. Employer may decide when hours are taken, but it may not be during a regular meal break.

Time off not required if: Employee has 2 consecutive nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Kentucky

Ky. Const. § 148; Ky. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 118.035

Time off work for voting: “Reasonable time,” but not less than 4 hours. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off is paid: No.

Employee must request leave in advance: One day before election.

Employee required to show proof of voting: No proof specified, but employee who takes time off and does not vote may be subject to disciplinary action.

Maryland

Md. Code Ann. [Elec. Law] § 10-315

Time off work for voting: 2 hours.

Time off not required if: Employee has 2 consecutive nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee required to show proof of voting: Yes; also includes attempting to vote. Must use state board of elections form.

Massachusetts

Mass. Gen. Laws ch. 149, § 178

Time off work for voting: First 2 hours that polls are open. (Applies to workers in manufacturing, mechanical, or retail industries.)

Time off is paid: No.

Employee must request leave in advance: Must apply for leave of absence (no time specified).

Minnesota

Minn. Stat. Ann. § 204C.04

Time off work for voting: May be absent for the time necessary to appear at the employee’s polling place, cast a ballot, and return to work.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Missouri

Mo. Rev. Stat. § 115.639

Time off work for voting: 3 hours. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has 3 consecutive nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes (if employee votes).

Employee must request leave in advance: “Prior to the day of election.”

Employee required to show proof of voting: None specified, but pay contingent on employee actually voting.

Nebraska

Neb. Rev. Stat. § 32-922

Time off work for voting: As much time as will add up to 2 consecutive hours when combined with nonwork time. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has 2 consecutive nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee must request leave in advance: Prior to or on election day.

Nevada

Nev. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 293.463

Time off work for voting: If it is impracticable to vote before or after work: Employee who works 2 miles or less from polling place may take 1 hour; 2 to 10 miles, 2 hours; more than 10 miles, 3 hours. Employer will decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has sufficient nonwork time when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee must request leave in advance: Prior to election day.

New Mexico

N.M. Stat. Ann. § 1-12-42

Time off work for voting: 2 hours. (Includes Indian nation, tribal, and pueblo elections.) Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee’s workday begins more than 2 hours after polls open or ends more than 3 hours before polls close.

Time off is paid: Yes.

New York

N.Y. Elec. Law § 3-110

Time off work for voting: As many hours at beginning or end of shift as will give employee enough time to vote when combined with nonwork time. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has 4 consecutive nonwork hours at beginning or end of shift when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes (up to 2 hours).

Employee must request leave in advance: Not more than 10 or less than 2 working days before election.

North Dakota

N.D. Cent. Code § 16.1-01-02.1

Time off work for voting: Employers are encouraged to give employees time off to vote when regular work schedule conflicts with times polls are open.

Time off is paid: No.

Ohio

Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 3599.06

Time off work for voting: “Reasonable time.”

Time off is paid: Yes.

Oklahoma

Okla. Stat. Ann. tit. 26, § 7-101

Time off work for voting: 2 hours, unless employee lives so far from polling place that more time is needed. Employer may decide when hours are taken or may change employee’s schedule to give employee nonwork time to vote.

Time off not required if: Employee’s workday begins at least 3 hours after polls open or ends at least 3 hours before polls close.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee must request leave in advance: One day before election.

Employee required to show proof of voting: Yes.

South Dakota

S.D. Codified Laws Ann. § 12-3-5

Time off work for voting: 2 consecutive hours. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has 2 consecutive nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Tennessee

Tenn. Code Ann. § 2-1-106

Time off work for voting: “Reasonable time” up to 3 hours during the time polls are open. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee’s workday begins at least 3 hours after polls open or ends at least 3 hours before polls close.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee must request leave in advance: Before noon on the day before the election.

Texas

Tex. Elec. Code Ann. § 276.004

Time off work for voting: Employer may not refuse to allow employee to take time off to vote, but no time limit specified.

Time off not required if: Employee has 2 consecutive nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Utah

Utah Code Ann. § 20A-3-103

Time off work for voting: 2 hours at beginning or end of shift. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has at least 3 nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes.

Employee must request leave in advance: “Before election day.”

West Virginia

W.Va. Code § 3-1-42

Time off work for voting: Up to 3 hours. (Employers in health, transportation, communication, production, and processing facilities may change employee’s schedule so that time off doesn’t impair essential operations but must allow employee sufficient and convenient time to vote.)

Time off not required if: Employee has at least 3 nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes (if employee votes).

Employee must request leave in advance: Written request at least 3 days before election.

Employee required to show proof of voting: None specified, but time off will be deducted from pay if employee does not vote.

Wisconsin

Wis. Stat. Ann. § 6.76

Time off work for voting: Up to 3 consecutive hours. Employer may decide when hours are taken.

Time off is paid: No.

Employee must request leave in advance: “Before election day.”

Wyoming

Wyo. Stat. § 22-2-111

Time off work for voting: One hour, other than a meal break. Employer may decide when the hour is taken.

Time off not required if: Employee has at least 3 consecutive nonwork hours when polls are open.

Time off is paid: Yes (if employee votes).

Employee required to show proof of voting: None specified, but pay contingent on employee voting.

Learn How to Vote here

Review Deck 2 - Subsection B: Meta Incident Log

Though much research done by Director Leonard Church was unconscionable, let the record stand that the root basis of his AI implantation program held merit were it not for the grave abuses committed against the AI and personnel under his charge. He took no precautions and ignored basic signs of neurological contamination between the test subjects and their AI counterparts.

As noted in Section 24 of the review deck, the primary subject, code name ‘Maine’ was outfitted with a modded Type-2 neural lattice and assigned AI fragment Sigma. The AI showed outset ability to both understand and translate the subject’s internal thoughts and desires, a symptom that research now recognizes as a Type 4 neural bleed. Subject and AI were already losing cognizant autonomy. The Director’s logs show that both he and those researchers under him attributed this ability as positive. 

Subjects York and North Dakota were beginning to exhibit Type 4 bleed by the end of the Program’s operational time line, though not to the extent of Subject Maine who, it is believed, was engaging in conscious neural sync with his assigned AI. Subject and AI succumbed rapidly to cross-platform contamination and began exhibiting behavioral signs of conscious singularity – shared objectives, thoughts, goals. This neurological degradation went undocumented by the Director’s research team because, if logs are to be believed, they simply allowed the Sigma AI to translate everything subject 'Maine’ was saying. 

By this point, it is fair to conclude Subject 'Maine’ and AI 'Sigma’ were no longer separate entities. Further notes to follow.