Shit Slytherins Say: #79
  • Hufflepuff: "Watch your language."
  • Slytherin: "Oh fuck, sorry."

Austin McKenzie- Thinking of You lyric video

You
I’m thinking of you
I’m dreaming of you
Pin in my mind
Bombarded by you
And I’m talking about you
I’m walking with you
Move on to the pain
I’m thinking of you
You… You… You…
You, you, you
You, you, you, you
I’m thinking of you
When the moon falls
When the stars crawl
I remember you dear
When my head lays
When my heart fades
I remember you dear
I’ll be thinking of you
I’m thinking of you
And I’m dreaming of you
Pin in my mind
Bombarded by you
Now I’m talking about you
I’m walking with you
Move on to the pain
I’m thinking of you
You… You… You…
You, you, you
You, you, you, you
I’m thinking of you
No my price ain’t fair baby
But, my thoughts can’t be bought
Then my pictures don’t fade baby
But I see you in the drought
And I owe it all to you
I’m thinking of you
I’m dreaming of you
Pin in my mind
Bombarded by you
I’m talking about you
And now I’m walking with you
Move on to the pain
I’m thinking of you
You… You… You…
You, you, you
You, you, you, you
I’m thinking of you
You… You… You…
You, you, you
You, you, you, you
I’m thinking of you

Language is powerful, and even those of us who don’t choose the bisexual label have a responsibility to ensure that the world is safe for those who do. One way to accomplish that goal is to practice saying the word ‘bisexual’. Say it again, ‘bisexual.’ Paint it on the walls; wear it on a t-shirt. Write it on toothpaste on your bathroom mirror; notice it as you stare at your beautiful self. Bisexual. Say it louder; say it in public; say it to someone who might not be comfortable hearing it. Let them begin to get over their discomfort. Begin to get over your own. Ask yourself: what is it about that word that is so frightening to people? How can we lower the fear content, undo the negative associations, create new meaning, open possibilities?
— 

Naomi Tucker 

I just remembered this quote after rereading an article from 2015 on why it’s more important than ever to say ‘bisexual’, an article I feel is even more relevant now. Please do all you can to advocate for bisexual visibility and inclusion (keeping in mind self care and personal safety is important!), no matter what your sexuality is.  ❤

When I still had long hair, my mom and grandma would sometimes smile at me and say “you have a mane like a lion”, and they always seemed so proud. So why then, when I learned that lionesses don’t grow manes, and I became a lion, and learned to roar like one too, did they want to silence me, to shut me down and out? Why do they no longer look at me with pride, when I am finding my power, my control, embracing that in myself, instead of some fucking genetic predisposition to growing thick hair? What is it about my hair that makes them proud, but my voice that makes them cringe? 

When we were out in public, I used to sometimes feel so close to my mom. When we saw people she knew, she would sometimes put an arm around me, and kind of shake me, and say, yep, this is {birth name}, she’s the youngest, our baby. And she would be smiling, and she would look so proud of me, just for existing in that space that we were in, but then I cut my hair short, and I think that must have been when she realized that I was no longer “her baby”. I was no longer the kid she had raised, I was a stranger she was expected to love, a stranger living under her roof, and that was the beginning of the end of our relationship. It’s all over now, though, and I don’t know if she knows how sad I am, all the time. I don’t know if she understands that when I ask her which version of her child is welcome at family events, the daughter she thought she had or the son she never wanted, I am asking her to tell me that she loves me, and anyone who feels most like who I am is welcome, and of course she wanted me and still does, of course I’m her son.. 

People say that it gets better, sometimes parents come around, but I don’t think that’ll ever happen for me. She’s wrapped up in her warped religion, she’s in a bubble, and I’m just another person sitting on the other side. 

teenvogue.com
Cole Sprouse Says Keeping Jughead Asexual Is “Severely Important”
The actor is advocating for the representation on ‘Riverdale.'
By De Elizabeth

Cole Sprouse plays Jughead Jones in the CW’s upcoming Riverdale, a new show reimagining the Archie comic series. Based on the character’s repeated, emphasized disinterest in girls, Jughead has been the focal point of much speculation regarding his sexuality over the course of the comics’ eight decades of publication. As recently as last year, the characters was revealed to be canonically asexual.

With the aging comics’ relevance revitalized via the CW’s Riverdale, many fans are wondering just how much the underrepresented sexuality (or rather, absence of) would be specifically emphasized. And there’s no greater advocate than the character’s actor himself.

“I hope that huge corporations like the CW recognize that this kind of representation is rare and severely important to people who resonate with it,” Sprouse tells Teen Vogue, “That demands representation. It would be a wonderful thing if that were the case.

Sprouse does reveal that the first season of Riverdale will not directly touch on asexuality; however, he does call the show an origin story, where the characters will learn, grow, and discover who they are. In the meantime, Sprouse says he will “keep fighting for this pretty heavily.”

Riverdale airs Thursdays at 9 on the CW.